Browse Definitions :
Definition

interactive whiteboard

An interactive whiteboard, also known as a smartboard, is an interactive display in the format of a whiteboard that reacts to user input either directly or through other devices.

For a while, standard whiteboards have been used commonly as a way people can share messages, present information, and engage in collaborative brainstorming and idea development. With the same cooperative goals in mind, interactive whiteboards have the ability to connect to the Internet and instantly digitize tasks and operations.

The technology behind interactive whiteboards varies between large format screens with a standalone system on a chip (SOC) and combinations of video projectors or smart projectors that use a tablet or other devices with drivers for user interaction. Forms of operation are often either by infrared or resistive touch, magnetic or ultrasonic pen. As writing and character recognition is generally digitized, keyboards can be almost completely unnecessary. Interactive whiteboard software often includes easy-to-use charts, polls and graphs, including virtual versions of tools one might find in a classroom like rulers compasses or protractors. They can play various types of media and provide teachers with interactive lessons for their students.

Interactive whiteboards are a billion dollar industry and are used in classrooms, boardrooms, engineering, coaching and the strategic planning of many types of projects. According to the Becta Harnessing Technology Schools Survey in 2007, 98% of British secondary schools and 100% of British primary schools had an interactive whiteboard in use.

This was last updated in May 2017

Continue Reading About interactive whiteboard

SearchCompliance
  • OPSEC (operations security)

    OPSEC (operations security) is a security and risk management process and strategy that classifies information, then determines ...

  • smart contract

    A smart contract is a decentralized application that executes business logic in response to events.

  • compliance risk

    Compliance risk is an organization's potential exposure to legal penalties, financial forfeiture and material loss, resulting ...

SearchSecurity
  • buffer overflow

    A buffer overflow occurs when a program or process attempts to write more data to a fixed-length block of memory, or buffer, than...

  • biometric verification

    Biometric verification is any means by which a person can be uniquely identified by evaluating one or more distinguishing ...

  • password

    A password is a string of characters used to verify the identity of a user during the authentication process.

SearchHealthIT
SearchDisasterRecovery
  • What is risk mitigation?

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

  • change control

    Change control is a systematic approach to managing all changes made to a product or system.

  • disaster recovery (DR)

    Disaster recovery (DR) is an organization's ability to respond to and recover from an event that affects business operations.

SearchStorage
  • What is RAID 6?

    RAID 6, also known as double-parity RAID, uses two parity stripes on each disk. It allows for two disk failures within the RAID ...

  • PCIe SSD (PCIe solid-state drive)

    A PCIe SSD (PCIe solid-state drive) is a high-speed expansion card that attaches a computer to its peripherals.

  • VRAM (video RAM)

    VRAM (video RAM) refers to any type of random access memory (RAM) specifically used to store image data for a computer display.

Close