Browse Definitions :
Definition

jailbreaking

Contributor(s): Lisa Phifer

Jailbreaking, in a mobile device context, is the use of an exploit to remove manufacturer or carrier restrictions from a device such as an iPhone or iPad. The exploit usually involves running a privilege escalation attack on a user’s device to replace the manufacturer’s factory-installed operating system with a custom kernel.

Apple users often jailbreak iPhones and iPads to install programs that are not available through Apple’s channels. Developers who don’t wish to undergo Apple review or comply with Apple’s AppStore rules often post apps on Cydia and other download sites used by jailbroken devices. Jailbreaking can also be used to bypass Digital Rights Management (DRM) and share copyrighted media, or to access file system, user interface, or network capabilities that are otherwise locked down.

However, jailbreaking increases the risk of malware infection or hacking. A jailbroken device can be easily victimized by a Trojan or accessed remotely by an intruder. Any security measures provided by iOS or installed third-party applications may be rendered inoperable or untrustworthy. As a result, employers often take steps to detect and then quarantine or wipe jailbroken devices. 

This was last updated in January 2013

Continue Reading About jailbreaking

Start the conversation

Send me notifications when other members comment.

Please create a username to comment.

-ADS BY GOOGLE

File Extensions and File Formats

Powered by:

SearchCompliance

  • compliance audit

    A compliance audit is a comprehensive review of an organization's adherence to regulatory guidelines.

  • regulatory compliance

    Regulatory compliance is an organization's adherence to laws, regulations, guidelines and specifications relevant to its business...

  • Whistleblower Protection Act

    The Whistleblower Protection Act of 1989 is a law that protects federal government employees in the United States from ...

SearchSecurity

  • reverse brute-force attack

    A reverse brute-force attack is a type of brute-force attack in which an attacker uses a common password against multiple ...

  • orphan account

    An orphan account, also referred to as an orphaned account, is a user account that can provide access to corporate systems, ...

  • voice squatting (skill squatting)

    Voice squatting is an attack vector for voice user interfaces (VUIs) that exploits homonyms (words that sound the same but are ...

SearchHealthIT

SearchDisasterRecovery

  • business continuity policy

    Business continuity policy is the set of standards and guidelines an organization enforces to ensure resilience and proper risk ...

  • business continuity and disaster recovery (BCDR)

    Business continuity and disaster recovery (BCDR) are closely related practices that describe an organization's preparation for ...

  • warm site

    A warm site is a type of facility an organization uses to recover its technology infrastructure when its primary data center goes...

SearchStorage

  • primary storage (main storage)

    Primary storage is the collective methods and technologies used to capture and retain digital information that is in active use ...

  • RAM (Random Access Memory)

    RAM (Random Access Memory) is the hardware in a computing device where the operating system (OS), application programs and data ...

  • cache memory

    Cache memory, also called CPU memory, is high-speed static random access memory (SRAM) that a computer microprocessor can access ...

Close