Browse Definitions :
Definition

magnetic field strength

Contributor(s): Dr. Arnulf Oppelt, Ney Feijo

Magnetic field strength is one of two ways that the intensity of a magnetic field can be expressed. Technically, a distinction is made between magnetic field strength H, measured in amperes per meter (A/m), and magnetic flux density B, measured in Newton-meters per ampere (Nm/A), also called teslas (T).

The magnetic field can be visualized as magnetic field lines. The field strength corresponds to the density of the field lines. The total number of magnetic field lines penetrating an area is called the magnetic flux. The unit of the magnetic flux is the tesla meter squared (T · m2, also called the weber and symbolized Wb). The older units for the magnetic flux, the maxwell (equivalent to 10-8 Wb), and for magnetic flux density, the gauss (equivalent to 10-4 T), are obsolete and seldom seen today.

Magnetic flux density diminishes with increasing distance from a straight current-carrying wire or a straight line connecting a pair of magnetic poles around which the magnetic field is stable. At a given location in the vicinity of a current-carrying wire, the magnetic flux density is directly proportional to the current in amperes. If a ferromagnetic object such as a piece of iron is brought into a magnetic field, the "magnetic force" exerted on that object is directly proportional to the gradient of the magnetic field strength where the object is located.

This was last updated in July 2007

SearchCompliance

SearchSecurity

  • cyber attack

    A cyber attack is any attempt to gain unauthorized access to a computer, computing system or computer network with the intent to ...

  • backdoor (computing)

    A backdoor is a means to access a computer system or encrypted data that bypasses the system's customary security mechanisms.

  • post-quantum cryptography

    Post-quantum cryptography, also called quantum encryption, is the development of cryptographic systems for classical computers ...

SearchHealthIT

SearchDisasterRecovery

  • risk mitigation

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

  • call tree

    A call tree is a layered hierarchical communication model that is used to notify specific individuals of an event and coordinate ...

  • Disaster Recovery as a Service (DRaaS)

    Disaster recovery as a service (DRaaS) is the replication and hosting of physical or virtual servers by a third party to provide ...

SearchStorage

  • cloud SLA (cloud service-level agreement)

    A cloud SLA (cloud service-level agreement) is an agreement between a cloud service provider and a customer that ensures a ...

  • NOR flash memory

    NOR flash memory is one of two types of non-volatile storage technologies.

  • RAM (Random Access Memory)

    RAM (Random Access Memory) is the hardware in a computing device where the operating system (OS), application programs and data ...

Close