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memristor

A memristor is an electrical component that limits or regulates the flow of electrical current in a circuit and remembers the amount of charge that has previously flowed through it. Memristors are important because they are non-volatile, meaning that they retain memory without power.

The original concept for memristors, as conceived in 1971 by Professor Leon Chua at the University of California, Berkeley, was a nonlinear, passive two-terminal electrical component that linked electric charge and magnetic flux. Since then, the definition of memristor has been broadened to include any form of non-volatile memory that is based on resistance switching, which increases the flow of current in one direction and decreases the flow of current in the opposite direction.

A memristor is often compared to an imaginary pipe that carries water. When the water flows in one direction, the pipe's diameter expands and allows the water to flow faster -- but when the water flows in the opposite direction, the pipe's diameter contracts and slows the water's flow down. If the water is shut off, the pipe retains its diameter until the water is turned back on. To continue the analogy, when a  memristor's power is shut off, the memristor retains its resistance value. This would mean that if power to a computer was cut off with a hard shut down,  all the applications and documents that were open before the shut down would still be right there the screen when the computer was restarted.

Memristors, which are considered to be a sub-category of resistive RAM, are one of several storage technologies that have been predicted to replace flash memory. Scientists at HP Labs built the first working memristor in 2008 and since that time, researchers in many large IT companies have explored how memristors can be used to create smaller, faster, low-power computers that do not require data to be transferred between volatile and non-volatile memory. If the storage heirarchy could be flattened by replacing DRAM and hard drives with memristors, it would theoretically be possible to create analog computers capable of carrying out calculations on the same chips that store data. 

R. Stanley Williams explains how a memristor works.

 

This was last updated in May 2015

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In the meantime, it should be clear that the HP Labs have not invented or found a device which works like a genuine, non-volatile memristor. HP’s original memristor model which was presented in the NATURE paper “The missing memristor found” (Nature 453, 80-83 (2008)) suffers from fundamental physical flaws in its construction. The “memristor” claims are misleading when viewed from the perspective of electrochemistry: one cannot derive the characteristic dynamical state equations of a non-volatile memristor on base of HP's ion drift model. The critique can be found in the paper “Fundamental Issues and Problems in the Realization of Memristors” by P. Meuffels and R. Soni (http://arxiv.org/abs/1207.7319).
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Five years on from the previous comment it would seem that those problems have been overcome.  Production of that original idea could commence.  However improvements continue and similar devices with different parameters are being developed.  An example would be the memristor which loses its memory over a few seconds. (Perhaps adding an eighth type of gate, the 'when' gate)  There is a use for memory which forgets.  A volatile memory gate allows a learning system to forget inefficient outcomes so that a task can be learnt quicker.  In our own brains this process occurs.  We dream at night whilst our brains reinforce useful experiences and forget unproductive lines of thought.

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