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micro-HDMI

Micro-HDMI (HDMI type D) is a miniaturized version of the High Definition Multimedia Interface specification.

The format was designed to combine audio and video into a single digital interface small enough to connect to smartphones, tablets and other mobile devices. That capacity allows the user to connect their mobile devices to HDMI-compatible audiovisual devices, such as computer monitors, digital televisions and video projectors.

The basis for HDMI is High Bandwidth Digital Content Protection (HDCP) and its core technology, Digital Visual Interface (DVI). HDCP is an Intel specification used to protect digital content transmitted and received by DVI-compliant displays and audio visual receivers.

HDMI versions 1 - 2.0 support standard, enhanced, or high-definition video plus standard-to-digital multichannel surround sound audio in backwards-compatible cables and connectors. Micro-HDMI benefits parallel those of the full-sized version: It enables uncompressed digital audio video, a bandwidth of up to 18 gigabytes per second and a single connector instead of several cables and connectors between the video source and the display device.

HDMI development is overseen by the HDMI Working Group, which includes Sony, Hitachi, Silicon Image, Philips, and Toshiba. Manufacturers of HDMI-compliant devices are required to pay HDMI licensing fees.

 

 

This was last updated in September 2013

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