Browse Definitions :
Definition

mobile deep linking

Mobile deep linking is the use of URIs (uniform resource identifiers) to make specific parts of mobile applications addressable so that those elements can be accessed directly by mobile users.

Deep linking is the expected behavior online. It means, for example, that the link for smartphone takes you directly to the definition for that term, rather than the home page of SearchMobileComputing. Similarly, a link in an ad on a website usually takes you to a page where you can purchase the product rather than the retailer's home page. 

However, mobile applications have typically lacked deep links, which makes it impossible for one app to connect the user to a particular part of another app. Mobile users often attempt to engage with links through social shares, push notifications, emails and other sources. Generally, however, a link just takes the user to the application's mobile website or perhaps a listing in an app store. Deep mobile links allow the user to launch the app and go directly to the appropriate screen.

For the user, the benefit is convenience: Mobile deep linking makes it easier for people to access resources and use applications on smartphones, tablets and other mobile devices because it decreases the number of actions they have to take to get to their target destination. For mobile app and content creators, on the other hand, deep linking could mean the difference between success and failure: If elements inside an app are not addressable, they cannot be indexed by a search engine and will not show up in user searches. For content, that translates to a lost audience; for a vendor, it translates to lost sales. 

Twitter, Facebook, Spotify and Etsy are among the companies currently developing the infrastructure to enable deep linking.

See a video presentation on mobile deep linking:

This was last updated in April 2015

Continue Reading About mobile deep linking

SearchCompliance
  • compliance risk

    Compliance risk is an organization's potential exposure to legal penalties, financial forfeiture and material loss, resulting ...

  • information governance

    Information governance is a holistic approach to managing corporate information by implementing processes, roles, controls and ...

  • enterprise document management (EDM)

    Enterprise document management (EDM) is a strategy for overseeing an organization's paper and electronic documents so they can be...

SearchSecurity
  • Extensible Authentication Protocol (EAP)

    The Extensible Authentication Protocol (EAP) is a protocol for wireless networks that expands the authentication methods used by ...

  • session key

    A session key is an encryption and decryption key that is randomly generated to ensure the security of a communications session ...

  • data breach

    A data breach is a cyber attack in which sensitive, confidential or otherwise protected data has been accessed and/or disclosed ...

SearchHealthIT
SearchDisasterRecovery
  • risk mitigation

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

  • call tree

    A call tree is a layered hierarchical communication model that is used to notify specific individuals of an event and coordinate ...

  • Disaster Recovery as a Service (DRaaS)

    Disaster recovery as a service (DRaaS) is the replication and hosting of physical or virtual servers by a third party to provide ...

SearchStorage
  • cloud storage

    Cloud storage is a service model in which data is transmitted and stored on remote storage systems, where it is maintained, ...

  • cloud testing

    Cloud testing is the process of using the cloud computing resources of a third-party service provider to test software ...

  • storage virtualization

    Storage virtualization is the pooling of physical storage from multiple storage devices into what appears to be a single storage ...

Close