Browse Definitions :
Definition

not invented here (NIH) syndrome

Not invented here (NIH) syndrome is the tendency for management to reject any idea that did not originate within the organization. This type of bias has its roots in xenophobia, the fear of anything strange or foreign. The automatic rejection of external products, services and methodologies is often fueled by narcissism and a desire to maintain complete control. When the NIH syndrome is ignored, employees are continually forced to reinvent the wheel, without any assurance that the new solution they create will be better than previously-available third-party solutions. 

The NIH syndrome can result in a loss of productivity and wasted resources, so it's important for managers to be aware of the syndrome and remain open to third-party products and services, including those supported by a crowdsourcing business model. In order to prevent NIH syndrome from becoming the status quo, guidelines should be put into place to help managers decide when it is more appropriate to use an external solution than create it in house.  Examples of use cases include:

  • No third-party solution can be found.
  • A third-party solution exists, but cost is prohibitive. 
  • A third-party solution exists, but it is not compatible with existing business practices, standards, programming languages or platforms.
  • A third-party solution exists, but it can not be customized. 
  • A third-party solution exists, but it is registered under a license that does not comply with the intended use.

This was last updated in October 2018

Continue Reading About not invented here (NIH) syndrome

SearchCompliance
  • ISO 31000 Risk Management

    The ISO 31000 Risk Management framework is an international standard that provides businesses with guidelines and principles for ...

  • pure risk

    Pure risk refers to risks that are beyond human control and result in a loss or no loss with no possibility of financial gain.

  • risk reporting

    Risk reporting is a method of identifying risks tied to or potentially impacting an organization's business processes.

SearchSecurity
  • walled garden

    On the internet, a walled garden is an environment that controls the user's access to network-based content and services.

  • potentially unwanted program (PUP)

    A potentially unwanted program (PUP) is a program that may be unwanted, despite the possibility that users consented to download ...

  • plaintext

    In cryptography, plaintext is usually ordinary readable text before it is encrypted into ciphertext or after it is decrypted.

SearchHealthIT
SearchDisasterRecovery
  • What is risk mitigation?

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

  • fault-tolerant

    Fault-tolerant technology is a capability of a computer system, electronic system or network to deliver uninterrupted service, ...

  • synchronous replication

    Synchronous replication is the process of copying data over a storage area network, local area network or wide area network so ...

SearchStorage
  • Remote Direct Memory Access (RDMA)

    Remote Direct Memory Access (RDMA) is a technology that enables two networked computers to exchange data in main memory without ...

  • storage (computer storage)

    Data storage is the collective methods and technologies that capture and retain digital information on electromagnetic, optical ...

  • storage medium (storage media)

    In computers, a storage medium is a physical device that receives and retains electronic data for applications and users and ...

Close