Browse Definitions :
Definition

onboard intelligence

Onboard intelligence is the use of artificial intelligence (AI) that is housed locally in the device it operates.

The use of onboard intelligence helps accommodate AI uses where offloading resources externally is problematic. Such situations include remote environments and ones where connectivity or power delivery is an issue. While onboard intelligence is often web-accessible, it is often focused on autonomous operation capabilities.

Often AI implementations use both local and remote computing resources to enable greater processing power. This separation of resources can be to reduce local power draw. They may also be made separate for mobility or battery life considerations.

Mobility is a major concern in automotive applications of onboard intelligence. As vehicles can’t rely on the ability to connect adequately for the operation of remote compute power, autonomous driving cars operate with onboard intelligence. The localization of AI through onboard intelligence enables reliability in split second, life-or-death decisions that the upcoming technology has to make.

On the other hand, this divided approach limits where AI can be used. NASA, for example, has created an onboard intelligence solution for space called Frontier. Frontier is what is called an intelligent decision engine. While remaining simple enough to house locally onboard intelligence, Frontier can learn to make better decisions based on experience. This learning capability makes Frontier and other onboard intelligence more adaptable to uncertain environments such as space or other.

Commercially used drones may also benefit from onboard AI in order to enable autonomous operations. Even in crafts not operated autonomously, onboard intelligence can be a back up to help ensure the craft doesn’t fail its delivery or mission in the event of lost connectivity.

This was last updated in December 2017

Continue Reading About onboard intelligence

SearchCompliance

  • compliance risk

    Compliance risk is an organization's potential exposure to legal penalties, financial forfeiture and material loss, resulting ...

  • information governance

    Information governance is a holistic approach to managing corporate information by implementing processes, roles, controls and ...

  • enterprise document management (EDM)

    Enterprise document management (EDM) is a strategy for overseeing an organization's paper and electronic documents so they can be...

SearchSecurity

  • denial-of-service attack

    A denial-of-service (DoS) attack is a security event that occurs when an attacker makes it impossible for legitimate users to ...

  • information security (infosec)

    Information security, often shortened to infosec, is the practice, policies and principles to protect data and other kinds of ...

  • user authentication

    User authentication verifies the identity of a user attempting to gain access to a network or computing resource by authorizing a...

SearchHealthIT

SearchDisasterRecovery

  • risk mitigation

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

  • call tree

    A call tree is a layered hierarchical communication model that is used to notify specific individuals of an event and coordinate ...

  • Disaster Recovery as a Service (DRaaS)

    Disaster recovery as a service (DRaaS) is the replication and hosting of physical or virtual servers by a third party to provide ...

SearchStorage

  • cloud storage

    Cloud storage is a service model in which data is transmitted and stored on remote storage systems, where it is maintained, ...

  • cloud testing

    Cloud testing is the process of using the cloud computing resources of a third-party service provider to test software ...

  • storage virtualization

    Storage virtualization is the pooling of physical storage from multiple storage devices into what appears to be a single storage ...

Close