Browse Definitions :
Definition

onboard intelligence

Onboard intelligence is the use of artificial intelligence (AI) that is housed locally in the device it operates.

The use of onboard intelligence helps accommodate AI uses where offloading resources externally is problematic. Such situations include remote environments and ones where connectivity or power delivery is an issue. While onboard intelligence is often web-accessible, it is often focused on autonomous operation capabilities.

Often AI implementations use both local and remote computing resources to enable greater processing power. This separation of resources can be to reduce local power draw. They may also be made separate for mobility or battery life considerations.

Mobility is a major concern in automotive applications of onboard intelligence. As vehicles can’t rely on the ability to connect adequately for the operation of remote compute power, autonomous driving cars operate with onboard intelligence. The localization of AI through onboard intelligence enables reliability in split second, life-or-death decisions that the upcoming technology has to make.

On the other hand, this divided approach limits where AI can be used. NASA, for example, has created an onboard intelligence solution for space called Frontier. Frontier is what is called an intelligent decision engine. While remaining simple enough to house locally onboard intelligence, Frontier can learn to make better decisions based on experience. This learning capability makes Frontier and other onboard intelligence more adaptable to uncertain environments such as space or other.

Commercially used drones may also benefit from onboard AI in order to enable autonomous operations. Even in crafts not operated autonomously, onboard intelligence can be a back up to help ensure the craft doesn’t fail its delivery or mission in the event of lost connectivity.

This was last updated in December 2017

Continue Reading About onboard intelligence

SearchCompliance
  • pure risk

    Pure risk refers to risks that are beyond human control and result in a loss or no loss with no possibility of financial gain.

  • risk reporting

    Risk reporting is a method of identifying risks tied to or potentially impacting an organization's business processes.

  • risk profile

    A risk profile is a quantitative analysis of the types of threats an organization, asset, project or individual faces.

SearchSecurity
  • script kiddie

    Script kiddie is a derogative term that computer hackers coined to refer to immature, but often just as dangerous, exploiters of ...

  • cipher

    In cryptography, a cipher is an algorithm for encrypting and decrypting data.

  • What is risk analysis?

    Risk analysis is the process of identifying and analyzing potential issues that could negatively impact key business initiatives ...

SearchHealthIT
SearchDisasterRecovery
  • What is risk mitigation?

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

  • fault-tolerant

    Fault-tolerant technology is a capability of a computer system, electronic system or network to deliver uninterrupted service, ...

  • synchronous replication

    Synchronous replication is the process of copying data over a storage area network, local area network or wide area network so ...

SearchStorage
  • gigabyte (GB)

    A gigabyte (GB) -- pronounced with two hard Gs -- is a unit of data storage capacity that is roughly equivalent to 1 billion ...

  • MRAM (magnetoresistive random access memory)

    MRAM (magnetoresistive random access memory) is a method of storing data bits using magnetic states instead of the electrical ...

  • storage volume

    A storage volume is an identifiable unit of data storage. It can be a removable hard disk, but it does not have to be a unit that...

Close