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rack server (rack-mounted server)

This definition is part of our Essential Guide: Server form factors: A guide to rackmount, blade servers and more

A rack server, also called a rack-mounted server, is a computer dedicated to use as a server and designed to be installed in a framework called a rack. The rack contains multiple mounting slots called bays, each designed to hold a hardware unit secured in place with screws. A rack server has a low-profile enclosure, in contrast to a tower server, which is built into an upright, standalone cabinet.

A single rack can contain multiple servers stacked one above the other, consolidating network resources and minimizing the required floor space. The rack server configuration also simplifies cabling among network components. In an equipment rack filled with servers, a special cooling system is necessary to prevent excessive heat buildup that would otherwise occur when many power-dissipating components are confined in a small space.

See also blade server.

This was last updated in March 2011

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standardized as multiples of 1.75 inches (44.45 mm) or one rack unit or U (less commonly RU). The industry standard rack cabinet is 42U tall.

http://rack19.info
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Some companies offer custom server racks designed for critical equipment. Check out Martin Enclosures for high quality server racks and rackmount enclosures.

http://www.martinenclosures.com
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Which server hardwrare can be used to maintain various internal hosting application?
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