Browse Definitions :
Definition

reality computing

Reality computing is the use of reality capture in conjunction with computer aided simulation, design and manufacturing CAD/CAM. This enables faster design and solutions.

Reality computing makes possible the use of computers to faster design, engineer and create physical objects by capturing real world 3D data and modifying or designing in the digital medium. This process is much faster than many measurements and physical prototypes. Reality capture is more accurate and takes into account real world part anomalies in ways working from specifications or blueprints cannot.

Reality capture can be achieved by techniques such as lidar where lasers take detailed scans of a subject or photogrammetry. Another method by which reality capture is achieved using photographs to reconstruct an accurate scale 3D representation of the subject to be worked on. CAD is used to create a new piece or modify the subject. Once a suitable solution is created, it can quickly be produced by either additive (like 3D printing) or subtractive manufacturing (like CNC milling machines).

Reality computing is used by engineers, designers, inventors and creative artists to reduce time and increase accuracy in many types of work from tiny machine parts to civic projects like highway overpass design. 

This was last updated in October 2016

Continue Reading About reality computing

SearchCompliance
  • OPSEC (operations security)

    OPSEC (operations security) is a security and risk management process and strategy that classifies information, then determines ...

  • smart contract

    A smart contract is a decentralized application that executes business logic in response to events.

  • compliance risk

    Compliance risk is an organization's potential exposure to legal penalties, financial forfeiture and material loss, resulting ...

SearchSecurity
  • email spam

    Email spam, also known as junk email, refers to unsolicited email messages, usually sent in bulk to a large list of recipients.

  • security policy

    A security policy is a document that states in writing how a company plans to protect its physical and information technology (IT...

  • shadow password file

    A shadow password file, also known as /etc/shadow, is a system file in Linux that stores encrypted user passwords and is ...

SearchHealthIT
SearchDisasterRecovery
  • What is risk mitigation?

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

  • change control

    Change control is a systematic approach to managing all changes made to a product or system.

  • disaster recovery (DR)

    Disaster recovery (DR) is an organization's ability to respond to and recover from an event that affects business operations.

SearchStorage
  • bare-metal restore

    A bare-metal restore (also referred to as bare-metal recovery or bare-metal backup) is a data recovery and restoration process ...

  • mSATA SSD (mSATA solid-state drive)

    An mSATA SSD is a solid-state drive (SSD) that conforms to the mSATA interface specification developed by the Serial ATA (SATA) ...

  • network-attached storage (NAS)

    Network-attached storage (NAS) is dedicated file storage that enables multiple users and heterogeneous client devices to retrieve...

Close