Browse Definitions :
Definition

rolling forecast

A rolling forecast is an add/drop process for predicting the future over a set period of time. Rolling forecasts are often used in long-term weather predictions, project management, supply chain management and financial planning.

If, for example, an organization needs to anticipate operating expenses a year in advance, the rolling forecast's set period of time would be 12 months. After the first month had passed, that month would be dropped from the beginning of the forecast and another month would be added to the end of the forecast. A rolling forecast's first in/first out (FIFO) process ensures that the forecast always covers the same amount of time. Because a rolling forecast window requires routine revisions, it is sometimes referred to as a continuous forecast or an iterative forecast  

Rolling forecasts can be contrasted with static forecasts and recursive forecasts. Static forecasts use a count-down process. A static forecast for an organization’s yearly operating expenses, for example, would still cover 12 specific months -- but once those 12 months had passed, the first forecast would be discarded and an entirely new forecast would be created for the next 12 months. Recursive forecasts, on the other hand, simply add more time to the initial forecast while keeping the same start date.

See also: fiscal year

This was last updated in November 2013

Continue Reading About rolling forecast

SearchCompliance
  • ISO 31000 Risk Management

    The ISO 31000 Risk Management framework is an international standard that provides businesses with guidelines and principles for ...

  • pure risk

    Pure risk refers to risks that are beyond human control and result in a loss or no loss with no possibility of financial gain.

  • risk reporting

    Risk reporting is a method of identifying risks tied to or potentially impacting an organization's business processes.

SearchSecurity
  • walled garden

    On the internet, a walled garden is an environment that controls the user's access to network-based content and services.

  • potentially unwanted program (PUP)

    A potentially unwanted program (PUP) is a program that may be unwanted, despite the possibility that users consented to download ...

  • plaintext

    In cryptography, plaintext is usually ordinary readable text before it is encrypted into ciphertext or after it is decrypted.

SearchHealthIT
SearchDisasterRecovery
  • What is risk mitigation?

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

  • fault-tolerant

    Fault-tolerant technology is a capability of a computer system, electronic system or network to deliver uninterrupted service, ...

  • synchronous replication

    Synchronous replication is the process of copying data over a storage area network, local area network or wide area network so ...

SearchStorage
  • Remote Direct Memory Access (RDMA)

    Remote Direct Memory Access (RDMA) is a technology that enables two networked computers to exchange data in main memory without ...

  • storage (computer storage)

    Data storage is the collective methods and technologies that capture and retain digital information on electromagnetic, optical ...

  • storage medium (storage media)

    In computers, a storage medium is a physical device that receives and retains electronic data for applications and users and ...

Close