Browse Definitions :
Definition

serial communications interface (SCI)

A serial communications interface (SCI) is a device that enables the serial (one bit at a time) exchange of data between a microprocessor and peripherals such as printers, external drives, scanners, or mice. In this respect, it is similar to a serial peripheral interface ( SPI ). But in addition, the SCI enables serial communications with another microprocessor or with an external network. The term SCI was coined by Motorola in the 1970s. In some applications it is known as a universal asynchronous receiver/transmitter ( UART ).

The SCI contains a parallel-to-serial converter that serves as a data transmitter, and a serial-to-parallel converter that serves as a data receiver. The two devices are clocked separately, and use independent enable and interrupt signals. The SCI operates in a nonreturn-to-zero ( NRZ ) format, and can function in half-duplex mode (using only the receiver or only the transmitter) or in full duplex (using the receiver and the transmitter simultaneously). The data speed is programmable.

Serial interfaces have certain advantages over parallel interfaces. The most significant advantage is simpler wiring. In addition, serial interface cables can be longer than parallel interface cables, because there is much less interaction (crosstalk) among the conductors in the cable.

The term SCI is sometimes used in reference to a serial port. This is a connector found on most personal computers, and is intended for use with serial peripheral devices.

This was last updated in March 2011

Continue Reading About serial communications interface (SCI)

SearchCompliance
  • OPSEC (operations security)

    OPSEC (operations security) is a security and risk management process and strategy that classifies information, then determines ...

  • smart contract

    A smart contract is a decentralized application that executes business logic in response to events.

  • compliance risk

    Compliance risk is an organization's potential exposure to legal penalties, financial forfeiture and material loss, resulting ...

SearchSecurity
  • hardware security module (HSM)

    A hardware security module (HSM) is a physical device that provides extra security for sensitive data.

  • buffer overflow

    A buffer overflow occurs when a program or process attempts to write more data to a fixed-length block of memory, or buffer, than...

  • biometric verification

    Biometric verification is any means by which a person can be uniquely identified by evaluating one or more distinguishing ...

SearchHealthIT
SearchDisasterRecovery
  • What is risk mitigation?

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

  • change control

    Change control is a systematic approach to managing all changes made to a product or system.

  • disaster recovery (DR)

    Disaster recovery (DR) is an organization's ability to respond to and recover from an event that affects business operations.

SearchStorage
  • What is RAID 6?

    RAID 6, also known as double-parity RAID, uses two parity stripes on each disk. It allows for two disk failures within the RAID ...

  • VRAM (video RAM)

    VRAM (video RAM) refers to any type of random access memory (RAM) specifically used to store image data for a computer display.

  • PCIe SSD (PCIe solid-state drive)

    A PCIe SSD (PCIe solid-state drive) is a high-speed expansion card that attaches a computer to its peripherals.

Close