Browse Definitions :
Definition

single-serving site

A single-serving site is a one-page, one-purpose website with a dedicated domain name.  

The oldest and perhaps simplest single-serving site is purple.com, which is an undifferentiated display of the color purple.  Many single-serving sites provide a function for the user.  For example, LMGTFY (Let Me Google That For You) creates a demonstration of how to conduct a user-specified Google search. Users can share links to the demos with people who ask them questions they could have just as easily researched themselves.  A number of sites answer a single yes-or-no-question, such as “Is it Tuesday?”, “Is it Christmas” and “Is Twitter down today?”

Here are a few other examples of single-serving sites:

  • Are You Tired? has a plain white background, the text “Are you tired?” and “Tell us why,” along with an email link so users can do so.
  • Am I awesome? provides randomly-generated positive responses to the question.
  • What is my IP? displays the user’s IP address.
  • Literally Unbelievable documents Facebook comments on stories from The Onion from readers who don’t realize that it’s a satire magazine.
  • Definitely informs visitors of the correct spelling of that word and lists all the common misspellings.  It is most vehement about the common misspelling of “defiantly,” which originated as a spellcheck or auto-correct error (also known as the Cupertino effect.)
  • Misanthropebook is a single-page, non-interactive parody of Facebook.
  • The Daily Nice is a picture of something that made the site owner happy each day.
  • Several websites claiming to be the last page of the Internet congratulate the user on reaching the end and exhort them to turn off their computers and go outside.

Jason Kottke, owner of one of the longest-running blogs on the Internet, created the term “single-serving site” in 2008 to describe what he saw as an increasing trend.

This was last updated in December 2013

Continue Reading About single-serving site

SearchCompliance
  • pure risk

    Pure risk refers to risks that are beyond human control and result in a loss or no loss with no possibility of financial gain.

  • risk reporting

    Risk reporting is a method of identifying risks tied to or potentially impacting an organization's business processes.

  • risk profile

    A risk profile is a quantitative analysis of the types of threats an organization, asset, project or individual faces.

SearchSecurity
  • script kiddie

    Script kiddie is a derogative term that computer hackers coined to refer to immature, but often just as dangerous, exploiters of ...

  • cipher

    In cryptography, a cipher is an algorithm for encrypting and decrypting data.

  • What is risk analysis?

    Risk analysis is the process of identifying and analyzing potential issues that could negatively impact key business initiatives ...

SearchHealthIT
SearchDisasterRecovery
  • What is risk mitigation?

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

  • fault-tolerant

    Fault-tolerant technology is a capability of a computer system, electronic system or network to deliver uninterrupted service, ...

  • synchronous replication

    Synchronous replication is the process of copying data over a storage area network, local area network or wide area network so ...

SearchStorage
  • gigabyte (GB)

    A gigabyte (GB) -- pronounced with two hard Gs -- is a unit of data storage capacity that is roughly equivalent to 1 billion ...

  • MRAM (magnetoresistive random access memory)

    MRAM (magnetoresistive random access memory) is a method of storing data bits using magnetic states instead of the electrical ...

  • storage volume

    A storage volume is an identifiable unit of data storage. It can be a removable hard disk, but it does not have to be a unit that...

Close