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smart projector

A smart projector is a video projector with extra inputs, connectivity and a built-in computer that is used primarily for entertainment and presentations. Like a standard video projector, a smart projector takes input audio/visual signals and outputs video to any flat surface.

Smart projectors have the ability to connect to the Internet and other sources for quick, large format presentations for bigger audiences. These smart devices, like a standard computer, often support multiple types of user-input USB devices, including keyboards and mice for extra usability. Typically, smart projectors support Ethernet, Wi-Fi, USB, Bluetooth and flash memory cards from digital cameras, as well as coaxial cable, HDMI, display port and other audio-video connections. They can also display pictures, music and video from connected storage devices.

Like a standard video projector, a smart projector's video source input is played internally on a small screen. Light is shone through the screen, then captured and focused by a lens or multiple lenses to display on a surface at a given distance. Most projectors today are digital and can be used like smart TVs, which include a small amount of miniaturized hardware and internal video processing capacity. Since the smart projector works by way of an operating system, the devices can connect to on-demand video services. Smart TV apps allow connection to services like YouTube, Netflix, Hulu and Vimeo, as well as social media sites like Facebook and Twitter.

There is a large variety of smart projector products. Features like built-in touchscreens and portable designs make them versatile to suit different user needs. Pocket-sized projectors and light socket LED bulb-based smart projectors to allow for increased portability and accessibility.

This was last updated in May 2017

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