Browse Definitions :
Definition

surge suppressor (surge protector)

See also Uninterruptible power supply .

A surge suppressor (sometimes optimistically called a "surge protector") is a device inserted in the alternating current ( AC ) utility line and/or telephone line to prevent damage to electronic equipment from voltage "spikes" called transients. A more accurate term for this type of device is "transient suppressor." A typical surge suppressor is a small box with several utility outlets, a power switch, and a 3-wire cord for plugging into a wall outlet.

In most countries where electronic equipment is used, the effective AC utility voltage is 110 to 120 volts; the peak voltage is on the order of plus-or-minus 160 to 170 volts at a frequency of 60 hertz . But transients, which arise from various causes, commonly reach peak levels of several hundred volts. These pulses are of short duration, measured in microseconds (units of 10 -6 second), but in that time, they can cause hardware to malfunction. The worst type of transient occurs when lightning strikes in the vicinity (it is not necessary for a power line to be directly hit). Such a "spike" can peak at thousands of volts and cause permanent damage to equipment.

A surge suppressor prevents the peak AC voltage from going above a certain threshold such as plus-or-minus 200 volts. Semiconductor devices are used for this purpose. The power line is effectively short-circuited to electrical ground for transient pulses exceeding the threshold, while the flow of normal 60-Hz current is unaffected. For the suppressor to work, a 3-wire AC power connection must be used. "Cheater" adapters, which allow 3-wire appliances to be used with 2-wire outlets or extension cords, defeat the electrical ground connection and render most surge suppressors ineffective.

Surge suppressors should be used as a matter of habit with all semiconductor-based electronic and computer hardware, including peripherals such as printers, monitors, external disk drives, and modem s. But the suppressor should not be relied upon to provide protection against lightning-induced transients. The safest procedure, inconvenient though it be, is to ensure that all susceptible hardware is plugged into the suppressor box, and to unplug the suppressor's main power cord when the equipment is not in use if you live in a thunderstorm-prone area.

This was last updated in March 2011

Join the conversation

1 comment

Send me notifications when other members comment.

Please create a username to comment.

All surge protectors still let threw power up to 330 volts or more. Anything connected to a surge protector still uses 250% the power requirement when there`s power surges.

They not offer protection against surges for appliances and electronics not connected to a surge protector. All small electronics and appliances not connected into a power bar suffer the effects of full power surges.

Lightning and other high-energy transient voltage surges can only be suppressed with a whole house surge protector.

The standard let-through voltage for 120 V AC devices (surge protector ei. surge bar) is 330 volts. The theoretical lowest limit possible let-through voltage for 120 volt power lines was 180 volts. New technology high quality surge suppressors can now clamp voltage at 130 volts.

Research and detailed information about power surges, surge protectors and lightning strikes can be found on this page:

http://armur.webs.com/surge-suppression


Modules offered by Armur Improves life expectancy by up to 32% of all electronics including appliances, electronics with microprocessors and anything with a motor.

Guaranteed savings on household yearly Hydro bill from 8% to 20%.

Modules are approved and certified CSA. All testing passed from the UL and the standards IEEE/ANSI. Those tests show that the characteristics and specification previously described by ARMUR are 100% guaranteed and certified.

Clamp voltage at 130 volts and protects against lightning.
Cancel

-ADS BY GOOGLE

File Extensions and File Formats

Powered by:

SearchCompliance

  • compliance audit

    A compliance audit is a comprehensive review of an organization's adherence to regulatory guidelines.

  • regulatory compliance

    Regulatory compliance is an organization's adherence to laws, regulations, guidelines and specifications relevant to its business...

  • Whistleblower Protection Act

    The Whistleblower Protection Act of 1989 is a law that protects federal government employees in the United States from ...

SearchSecurity

  • RSA algorithm (Rivest-Shamir-Adleman)

    The RSA algorithm is the basis of a cryptosystem -- a suite of cryptographic algorithms that are used for specific security ...

  • remote access

    Remote access is the ability to access a computer or a network remotely through a network connection.

  • IP Spoofing

    IP spoofing is the crafting of Internet Protocol (IP) packets with a source IP address that has been modified to impersonate ...

SearchHealthIT

SearchDisasterRecovery

  • network disaster recovery plan

    A network disaster recovery plan is a set of procedures designed to prepare an organization to respond to an interruption of ...

  • virtual disaster recovery

    Virtual disaster recovery is a type of DR that typically involves replication and allows a user to fail over to virtualized ...

  • tabletop exercise (TTX)

    A tabletop exercise (TTX) is a disaster preparedness activity that takes participants through the process of dealing with a ...

SearchStorage

  • enterprise storage

    Enterprise storage is a centralized repository for business information that provides common data management, protection and data...

  • disk array

    A disk array, also called a storage array, is a data storage system used for block-based storage, file-based storage or object ...

  • optical storage

    Optical storage is any storage type in which data is written and read with a laser. Typically, data is written to optical media, ...

Close