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technographic targeting (technographics)

Technographics targeting, is a business-to-business (B2B) marketing strategy that focuses attention on potential customers who use a specific hardware or software stack. The goal of technographics is to help marketers understand a customer's needs by analyzing the technology they are using. 

Technographic data is particularly useful to vendors who sell Software as a Service (SaaS) and companies that specialize in account-based marketing (ABM). Because companies tend to use the same hardware and software over long periods of time, technographic targeting strategies tends to be less volatile than intent-based marketing strategies. 

Collecting technographic data

Data to support technographic targeting is usually gathered from a variety of sources, including job postings for the targeted organization. Other strategies for gathering data include end user surveys and third-party lists.

Typically, the information collected for technographic targeting includes the following:

Device types -- For example, desktops, notebooks, tablets, sensors, actuators or smartphones.

Device manufacturer -- For example, Apple, Dell, HP, Microsoft, Samsung or LG. 

Operating System (OS) -- For example, Windows, MacOS, Linux, Android or iOS.

Web browser  -- For example, Firefox, Chrome, Safari, DuckDuckGo or Internet Explorer.

Software stack -- For example, LAMP stack or full stack.

This video explains the difference between intent data and technographic data.

This was last updated in December 2019

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