Browse Definitions :
Definition

telehealth

Telehealth is the transmission of health-related services or information over the telecommunications infrastructure. The term covers both telemedicine, which includes remote patient monitoring, and non-clinical elements of the healthcare system, such as education.

Telehealth examinations can be performed by physicians, nurses or other healthcare professionals over a videoconference connection to answer a patient's specific question about their condition. A telehealth visit can also be a remote substitute for a regular physician exam or as a follow-up visit to a previous care episode.

Convenience, for both sides of the care equation, is one of the major benefits of telehealth. Patients can communicate with physicians from their homes, or the patient can travel to a nearby public telehealth kiosk where a physician can conduct a thorough inspection of the patient's well-being.

In the United States, differences in state telemedicine licensure laws complicate the practice of telehealth. Some states require physicians to have full medical licenses to be able to practice telemedicine, while other states mandate physicians have special telemedicine licenses. Medicare and Medicaid reimbursement for telehealth services, such as remote checkups, has slowly been catching up to the level of in-person healthcare and the majority of states provide some amount of financial reimbursement to providers who perform telehealth visits.

The American Medical Association is one of the major healthcare groups that called for standards to be applied to telehealth to give patients more access to remote care services. The American Telemedicine Association, established in 1993, promotes the delivery of care through remote means and hosts a yearly conference on the latest news and developments in telehealth. The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) also supports the development of telehealth. A bill introduced in Congress in 2015 would allow qualified VA health professionals to treat U.S. veterans without requiring the patient and physician to be in the same state.

This was last updated in November 2015

Continue Reading About telehealth

SearchCompliance
  • pure risk

    Pure risk refers to risks that are beyond human control and result in a loss or no loss with no possibility of financial gain.

  • risk reporting

    Risk reporting is a method of identifying risks tied to or potentially impacting an organization's business processes.

  • risk profile

    A risk profile is a quantitative analysis of the types of threats an organization, asset, project or individual faces.

SearchSecurity
  • encryption key

    In cryptography, an encryption key is a variable value that is applied using an algorithm to a string or block of unencrypted ...

  • payload (computing)

    In computing, a payload is the carrying capacity of a packet or other transmission data unit.

  • script kiddie

    Script kiddie is a derogative term that computer hackers coined to refer to immature, but often just as dangerous, exploiters of ...

SearchHealthIT
SearchDisasterRecovery
  • What is risk mitigation?

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

  • fault-tolerant

    Fault-tolerant technology is a capability of a computer system, electronic system or network to deliver uninterrupted service, ...

  • synchronous replication

    Synchronous replication is the process of copying data over a storage area network, local area network or wide area network so ...

SearchStorage
  • cloud NAS (cloud network attached storage)

    Cloud NAS (network attached storage) is remote storage that is accessed over the internet as if it is local.

  • object storage

    Object storage, also called object-based storage, is an approach to addressing and manipulating data storage as discrete units, ...

  • gigabyte (GB)

    A gigabyte (GB) -- pronounced with two hard Gs -- is a unit of data storage capacity that is roughly equivalent to 1 billion ...

Close