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Definition

toroid

A toroid is a coil of insulated or enameled wire wound on a donut-shaped form made of powdered iron. A toroid is used as an inductor in electronic circuits, especially at low frequencies where comparatively large inductances are necessary.

A toroid has more inductance , for a given number of turns, than a solenoid with a core of the same material and similar size. This makes it possible to construct high-inductance coils of reasonable physical size and mass. Toroidal coils of a given inductance can carry more current than solenoidal coils of similar size, because larger-diameter wires can be used, and the total amount of wire is less, reducing the resistance .

In a toroid, all the magnetic flux is contained in the core material. This is because the core has no ends from which flux might leak off. The confinement of the flux prevents external magnetic fields from affecting the behavior of the toroid, and also prevents the magnetic field in the toroid from affecting other components in a circuit.

This was last updated in June 2010
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