Browse Definitions :
Definition

ultrabook

An ultrabook is a category of thin and light laptop computers designed to bridge the market gap between tablets and premium notebook PCs. Ultrabooks provide more business-friendly features than tablets and more portability than enterprise-class notebooks. 

Intel developed the first ultrabooks in 2011, at least partially in response to the success of Apple's similarly thin and lightweight  MacBook Air. Most manufacturers have advertised ultrabooks as "designer" laptops.

Typical specifications of the first generation of ultrabooks include: 

  • Less than 20 millimeters (0.8 inches) thick.
  • High-performance, low-voltage Intel processors in the Sandy Bridge or Ivy Bridge families. 
  • Fast storage, typically in the form of solid state disk drives (SSDs).
  • Long battery life (typically 8+ hours).
  • Near instant-on and instant-resume capabilities. 
  • Retail price of less than $1,000.

Ultrabooks are sometimes confused with netbooks. In comparison, ultrabooks use more powerful processors and have better video performance, faster storage, more RAM and larger screen sizes. As a consequence, ultrabooks are significantly more expensive than netbooks. However, ultrabook prices are expected to drop as low as $500 as Intel transitions to its "Hawell" system-on-a-chip (SoC) processors.

This was last updated in January 2012
SearchCompliance
  • pure risk

    Pure risk refers to risks that are beyond human control and result in a loss or no loss with no possibility of financial gain.

  • risk reporting

    Risk reporting is a method of identifying risks tied to or potentially impacting an organization's business processes.

  • risk profile

    A risk profile is a quantitative analysis of the types of threats an organization, asset, project or individual faces.

SearchSecurity
  • encryption key

    In cryptography, an encryption key is a variable value that is applied using an algorithm to a string or block of unencrypted ...

  • payload (computing)

    In computing, a payload is the carrying capacity of a packet or other transmission data unit.

  • script kiddie

    Script kiddie is a derogative term that computer hackers coined to refer to immature, but often just as dangerous, exploiters of ...

SearchHealthIT
SearchDisasterRecovery
  • What is risk mitigation?

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

  • fault-tolerant

    Fault-tolerant technology is a capability of a computer system, electronic system or network to deliver uninterrupted service, ...

  • synchronous replication

    Synchronous replication is the process of copying data over a storage area network, local area network or wide area network so ...

SearchStorage
  • cloud NAS (cloud network attached storage)

    Cloud NAS (network attached storage) is remote storage that is accessed over the internet as if it is local.

  • Terabyte (TB)

    A terabyte (TB) is a unit of digital data that is equal to about 1 trillion bytes.

  • object storage

    Object storage, also called object-based storage, is an approach to addressing and manipulating data storage as discrete units, ...

Close