Browse Definitions :
Definition

validated learning

Contributor(s): Matthew Haughn

Validated learning is an approach to demonstrating progress against business goals when traditional key performance indicators (KPIs) are not very useful. In his book, "Lean Startup," author Eric Ries described validated learning as a small unit of progress that can be quickly verified to determine whether a chosen direction is correct.

Validated learning treats product development as a series of experiments that use scientific method to answer questions about market demand.  Once the entrepreneur has created a hypothesis about what customers want, the next step is to test the hypothesis by building a prototype -- which in lean-speak is referred to as a minimum viable product (MVP). Potential customers are then asked for feedback about the prototype and the information is used to validate reality and fine-tune the product. The process is purposely iterative and is continually repeated throughout the product's lifecycle.

Validated learning is especially good at helping startups avoid building features that customers don't want or need. The thinking is that by continually validating what matters most to customers, the startup will be more likely to eventually demonstrate progress against traditional KPIs, including revenue.

Although validated learning got its start as part of the build-measure-learn (BML) approach to efficient product development in lean manufacturing, its simple tenents can be applied to the development of a wide variety of products and services, including software development.

This was last updated in February 2018

Continue Reading About validated learning

Start the conversation

Send me notifications when other members comment.

Please create a username to comment.

-ADS BY GOOGLE

File Extensions and File Formats

SearchCompliance

  • regulatory compliance

    Regulatory compliance is an organization's adherence to laws, regulations, guidelines and specifications relevant to its business...

  • privacy compliance

    Privacy compliance is a company's accordance with established personal information protection guidelines, specifications or ...

  • data governance policy

    A data governance policy is a documented set of guidelines for ensuring that an organization's data and information assets are ...

SearchSecurity

  • asymmetric cryptography (public key cryptography)

    Asymmetric cryptography, also known as public-key cryptography, is a process that uses a pair of related keys -- one public key ...

  • Evil Corp

    Evil Corp is an international cybercrime network that uses malicious software to steal money from its victims' bank accounts.

  • Plundervolt

    Plundervolt is a method of hacking that involves depriving an Intel chip of power so that processing errors occur.

SearchHealthIT

  • telemedicine (telehealth)

    Telemedicine is the remote delivery of healthcare services, such as health assessments or consultations, over the ...

  • Project Nightingale

    Project Nightingale is a controversial partnership between Google and Ascension, the second largest health system in the United ...

  • medical practice management (MPM) software

    Medical practice management (MPM) software is a collection of computerized services used by healthcare professionals and ...

SearchDisasterRecovery

SearchStorage

  • M.2 SSD

    An M.2 SSD is a solid-state drive (SSD) that conforms to a computer industry specification written for internally mounted storage...

  • RAID (redundant array of independent disks)

    RAID (redundant array of independent disks) is a way of storing the same data in different places on multiple hard disks or ...

  • cache memory

    Cache memory, also called CPU memory, is high-speed static random access memory (SRAM) that a computer microprocessor can access ...

Close