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video wall

A video wall is a large display consisting of more than one video screen fixed together to form a single logical screen.

A video wall can be formed using LCD or LED computer screens, traditional television sets and video projectors. They can also be formed in the traditional square or rectangular shape of a television, or a less traditional shape. When a video wall is created by combining several videos, the screens used often have ultra-thin edges called bezels to make a disruption in the picture between screens less noticeable. The screens are commonly connected together using a daisy chain method so that a command such as turning the video on or off works on all of the screens at once. 

Video walls can be operated using a video controller. Types of video controllers include:

Hardware-based controller: Commonly used for a single purpose, similar to a remote control used for a traditional television. Without its own operating system (OS), they are built using video processing chips with one or several inputs that split the content for delivery onto multiple displays. While they lack flexibility, they are regarded as consistent with superior performance.

Software-based controller: Requires a dedicated PC running an OS or a server with special graphics cards. While offering more flexibility with the ability to run and display applications directly to the video wall, software-based controllers are open to typical computing vulnerabilities, such as viruses and crashing, and can require inconvenient updates. Performance is based on the quality of graphics cards and management software.

Video walls are used in business and transportation, as well as entertainment. They are also useful in very large places where information needs to reach massive crowds, such as stadiums and airports.

This was last updated in September 2018

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