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videogrammetry

Contributor(s): Matthew Haughn

Videogrammetry enables complex detailed measurements in multiple dimensions of complex structures, which can include everything from organic beings to inanimate objects and complex systems. Videogrammetry is most commonly used in the manufacturing industry, but also in architecture and 3D modeling.

Videogrammetry can employ just about any device able to capture video. The back end is processed with software, such as Cinema 4D, in conjunction with laser or other 3D scanners and digital cameras to cover the color. Much more economical than some higher-end methods, videogrammetry does tend to produce 3D models that need some cleanup due to artifacts and are sometimes only useful as reference framework.

There are some techniques to help ensure higher quality scans. Primarily, the quality of the video will determine the quality of the scan, so a clean high-resolution video will tend to have better results. Even still, a stable image is important and requiring a steady hand and care to make smooth movements. While a gimbal or steadycam can help, motion blur can create geometry artifacting. If possible, soft lighting with no shadows makes for additional accuracy as well. A reference background with a repeating pattern can also be a part of a professional set up.

3D scanning is the next step of videogrammetry. Much more accurate 3D models are constructed by laser scanning as digital cameras fill in the color data with textures that can exceed 70k megapixels. The scans produced by this technique are very accurate, down to sub-millimeter precision.

Watch videogrammetry in action in the video below:

This was last updated in June 2018

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