Browse Definitions :
Definition

wearables OS (wearables operating system)

A wearable OS is an operating system designed or refactored to satisfy the requirements of wearable computers, which can be significantly from one type of device to another and also different from the requirements of both desktop and mobile devices.

Wearable computers include smartwatches, smart rings, embedded clothing, fitness and health monitors in various form factors and headsets, such as Google Glass and Microsoft’s HoloLens.

In addition to the multiplicity of devices and the diversity of their physical sizes, there are two main operational modes: Some wearable devices operate in standalone mode, while others use a wireless connection to an Internet-connected device, typically a smartphone.

Most smartwatches, for example, connect to the user’s smartphone to enable their Web interface. In that case, the wearable OS is essentially a mobile operating system adapted to allow the watch to serve as a user interface.  The watch itself is effectively a wireless Bluetooth adaptor that extends smartphone capabilities to the watch, allowing the user to answer and initiate phone calls, read and dictate email and text messages, get weather reports or sports scores, listen to music or ask a digital assistant a question. 

A standalone smartwatch, on the other hand, is typically dedicated to a particular purpose, such as GSP navigation or healthcare-related data monitoring, recording and transmitting.

Wearable operating systems include Android Wear, Tizen for Wearables, Google Fit, Apple's watchOS and MediaTek’s LinkIt.

.

This was last updated in October 2015

Continue Reading About wearables OS (wearables operating system)

SearchCompliance
  • smart contract

    A smart contract is a decentralized application that executes business logic in response to events.

  • compliance risk

    Compliance risk is an organization's potential exposure to legal penalties, financial forfeiture and material loss, resulting ...

  • information governance

    Information governance is a holistic approach to managing corporate information by implementing processes, roles, controls and ...

SearchSecurity
  • threat modeling

    Threat modeling is a procedure for optimizing application, system or business process security by identifying objectives and ...

  • social engineering

    Social engineering is an attack vector that relies heavily on human interaction and often involves manipulating people into ...

  • distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack

    A distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack is one in which multiple compromised computer systems attack a target, such as a ...

SearchHealthIT
SearchDisasterRecovery
  • change control

    Change control is a systematic approach to managing all changes made to a product or system.

  • disaster recovery (DR)

    Disaster recovery (DR) is an organization's ability to respond to and recover from an event that affects business operations.

  • risk mitigation

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

SearchStorage
  • race condition

    A race condition is an undesirable situation that occurs when a device or system attempts to perform two or more operations at ...

  • storage security

    Storage security is the group of parameters and settings that make storage resources available to authorized users and trusted ...

  • cloud storage

    Cloud storage is a service model in which data is transmitted and stored on remote storage systems, where it is maintained, ...

Close