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Definition

workload automation

Workload automation is the practice of using software to schedule, initiate, run and manage tasks related to business processes and transactions. A workload, in this context, can be thought of as the total amount of processing that a computer or a business is conducting at any given time. Workload automation makes it possible for much of that processing to take place without human intervention. Workload automation is often used in virtualized and cloud environments.

The approach represents a shift from time-driven to event-driven processing. Previously, due to network limitations and high daytime traffic, many such tasks were accumulated for batch processing, to be run at night. Transactions that require more time than straightforward online transactional processing (OLTP) have become the domain of workload automation. Actions are managed as asynchronous transfers by background processes that are the core component of workload automation.

Workload automation products integrate schedule changes to avoid resource conflicts and forecast when jobs will be finished. The software uses automated provisioning to respond to incidents and resource shortages, ensuring that jobs will conclude on time.

Good workload automation products include:

  • Centralized      control to manage multiple business activities.
  • Timely      completion of processes.
  • Automated      self service so users can start processes on their own without IT      intervention.

This was last updated in August 2016

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