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360 - CRE

  • 360-degree photograph - 360-degree photos simulate being in the shoes of a photographer and looking around to the left, right, up and down as desired as well as sometimes zooming.
  • 360-degree VR (360-degree virtual reality) - 360-degree VR (360-degree virtual reality) is an audiovisual simulation of an altered, augmented or substituted environment that surrounds the user, allowing them to look around them in all directions, just as they can in real life.
  • 3BL - The triple bottom line (3BL) is an expanded version of the business concept of the bottom line that includes social and environmental results as well as financial results.
  • 3D - In computers, 3-D (three dimensions or three-dimensional) describes an image that provides the perception of depth.
  • 3D audio (three-dimensional audio) - 3D audio is a simulation of the natural positioning of sounds for various applications including video presentations and games, virtual environments and sound stages.
  • 3D camera - A 3D camera is an imaging device that enables the perception of depth in images to replicate three dimensions as experienced through human binocular vision.
  • 3D chip - A 3-D chip is an integrated circuit (IC) containing a three-dimensional array of interconnected devices performing digital, analog, image processing and neural-network functions, either individually or in combination.
  • 3D gaming - 3D gaming is interactive computer entertainment that is graphically presented in the three dimensions of height, width and depth; the addition of depth to 2D gaming enabled the exploration of virtual worlds with more realistic representation.
  • 3D mesh - A 3D mesh is the structural build of a 3D model consisting of polygons.
  • 3D model - 3D models are used to portray real-world and conceptual visuals for art, entertainment, simulation and drafting and are integral to many different industries, including virtual reality, video games, 3D printing, marketing, TV and motion pictures, scientific and medical imaging and computer-aided design and manufacturing CAD/CAM.
  • 3D modeling - 3-D modeling is the use of software to create a virtual three-dimensional model of some physical object.
  • 3D mouse - A 3D mouse is a pointing and control device specialized for movement in virtual 3D (three-dimensional) environments.
  • 3D NAND flash - 3D NAND is a type of non-volatile flash memory in which the memory cells are stacked vertically in multiple layers.
  • 3D tradeshow - A virtual trade show is an online version of an event at which goods and services for a specific industry are exhibited and demonstrated.
  • 3D virtual tradeshow - A virtual trade show is an online version of an event at which goods and services for a specific industry are exhibited and demonstrated.
  • 3D XPoint - 3D XPoint is memory storage technology jointly developed by Intel and Micron Technology Inc.
  • 3G (third generation of mobile telephony) - 3G refers to the third generation of mobile telephony (that is, cellular) technology.
  • 3G card - A 3G card is a modem that allows a computing device to access the Internet wirelessly through a cellular provider's 3G network.
  • 3GL - In the computer industry, these abbreviations are widely used to represent major steps or "generations" in the evolution of programming languages.
  • 3GPP (3rd Generation Partnership Project) - The 3GPP, also known as the 3rd Generation Partnership Project, is a collaborative project between a group of telecommunications associations with the initial goal of developing globally applicable specifications for third generation (3G) mobile systems.
  • 3NF - Database normalization is intrinsic to most relational database schemes.
  • 3PL - A 3PL (third-party logistics) provider offers outsourced logistics services, which encompass anything that involves management of one or more facets of procurement and fulfillment activities.
  • 3PL (third-party logistics) - A 3PL (third-party logistics) provider offers outsourced logistics services, which encompass anything that involves management of one or more facets of procurement and fulfillment activities.
  • 3Vs (volume, variety and velocity) - 3Vs (volume, variety and velocity) are three defining properties of big data.
  • 4-D human atlas - CAVEman is an interactive, object-oriented model of a human body consisting of over 3,000 anatomically correct, catalogued and computerized body parts.
  • 4-D printing (four-dimensional printing) - 4-D printing is additive manufacturing that prints objects capable of transformation and, in some cases, self-assembly.
  • 4-G - 4G is the short term for fourth-generation wireless, the stage of broadband mobile communications that will supercede the third generation (3G) of wireless communications.
  • 40 Gigabit Ethernet (40GbE) - 40 Gigabit Ethernet (40GbE) is a standard that enables the transfer of Ethernet frames at speeds of up to 40 gigabits per second (Gbps).
  • 401(k) plan - A 401(k) plan is a type of retirement savings account.
  • 404 - 404 is a frequently-seen status code that tells a Web user that a requested page is "Not found.
  • 404 (status code) - 404 is a frequently-seen status code that tells a Web user that a requested page is "Not found.
  • 404 error page - A 404 page is the webpage served to a user who tries to access a page that is unavailable.
  • 42 - In Douglas Adams' "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy," 42 is the number from which all meaning ("the meaning of life, the universe, and everything") can be derived.
  • 42 (h2g2, meaning of life, The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy) - In Douglas Adams' "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy," 42 is the number from which all meaning ("the meaning of life, the universe, and everything") can be derived.
  • 4G - 4G is the short term for fourth-generation wireless, the stage of broadband mobile communications that will supercede the third generation (3G) of wireless communications.
  • 4G (fourth-generation wireless) - 4G is the short term for fourth-generation wireless, the stage of broadband mobile communications that will supercede the third generation (3G) of wireless communications.
  • 4GL - In the computer industry, these abbreviations are widely used to represent major steps or "generations" in the evolution of programming languages.
  • 4K video resolution - 4K video resolution is high-definition (HD) video that has four times the resolution of 1080p HD video.
  • 4X - In compact disc (CD) and digital versatile disc (DVD) technology, X is a base multiplier that expresses the speed with which data could be read (the read access time) from the compact disc in its original version, which was 150 kilobytes (KB) per second.
  • 5 Whys (Five Whys) - Five Whys, sometimes written as '5 Whys,' is a guided team exercise for identifying the root cause of a problem.
  • 50X - In compact disc (CD) and digital versatile disc (DVD) technology, X is a base multiplier that expresses the speed with which data could be read (the read access time) from the compact disc in its original version, which was 150 kilobytes (KB) per second.
  • 5G - Fifth-generation wireless (5G) is the latest iteration of cellular technology, engineered to greatly increase the speed and responsiveness of wireless networks.
  • 5G new radio (NR) - 5G new radio, or 5G NR, is a set of standards that replace the LTE network 4G wireless communications standard.
  • 5G Quiz - Can you speak 5G? - Next-generation 5G wireless technology will offer faster speeds and increased capacity.
  • 5GL - In the computer industry, these abbreviations are widely used to represent major steps or "generations" in the evolution of programming languages.
  • 6 lessons learned from 'The Phoenix Project' - In The Phoenix Project, a seminal business novel about a fictional American company working through its digital transformation, there is a wealth of insightful lessons about DevOps, IT and working for a modern corporation in general.
  • 6 Sigma - Six Sigma is an approach to data-driven management that seeks to improve quality by measuring how many defects there are in a process and systematically eliminating them until there are as close to zero defects as possible.
  • 64-bit - A 64-bit processor is a microprocessor with a word size of 64 bits, a requirement for memory and data intensive applications such as computer-aided design (CAD) applications, database management systems, technical and scientific applications, and high-performance servers.
  • 64-bit processor - A 64-bit processor is a microprocessor with a word size of 64 bits, a requirement for memory and data intensive applications such as computer-aided design (CAD) applications, database management systems, technical and scientific applications, and high-performance servers.
  • 6G - 6G (sixth-generation wireless) is the successor to 5G cellular technology -- 6G networks will be able to use higher frequencies than 5G networks and provide substantially higher capacity and much lower latency.
  • 6to4 - 6to4 is a tunneling mechanism used to transfer IPv6 (Internet Protocol version 6) packets over an IPv4 infrastructure, typically the IPv4 Internet.
  • 7 days a week - 24x7 means "24 hours a day, 7 days a week" and is used to describe a service, such as computer server monitoring, that is continuous, is always available (day or night), or involves products that can run constantly without disruption or downtime.
  • 70 percent rule for productivity - According to the 70 percent rule, which has its roots in athletics, employees are most productive when a majority of their time is spent working at a less intense pace.
  • 70-20-10 (70-20-10 rule) - 70-20-10 is a formula that describes how someone learns to do their job.
  • 720p - 720p is the standard high-definition (HD) display resolution of 1280x720 pixels, with progressive scanning, at a 16x9 aspect ratio.
  • 8 level vestigial sideband - 8-VSB (8-level vestigial sideband) is a standard radio frequency (RF) modulation format chosen by the Advanced Television Systems Committee (ATSC) for the transmission of digital television (DTV) to consumers in the United States and other adopting countries.
  • 8 VSB - 8-VSB (8-level vestigial sideband) is a standard radio frequency (RF) modulation format chosen by the Advanced Television Systems Committee (ATSC) for the transmission of digital television (DTV) to consumers in the United States and other adopting countries.
  • 8-bit grayscale - Grayscale is a range of shades of gray without apparent color.
  • 8-level vestigial sideband - 8-VSB (8-level vestigial sideband) is a standard radio frequency (RF) modulation format chosen by the Advanced Television Systems Committee (ATSC) for the transmission of digital television (DTV) to consumers in the United States and other adopting countries.
  • 8-track tape - An 8-track tape is a hard plastic cartridge about the size of an external modem that houses a continuous loop of non-digital (analog) audio data stored on magnetic tape.
  • 8-VSB - 8-VSB (8-level vestigial sideband) is a standard radio frequency (RF) modulation format chosen by the Advanced Television Systems Committee (ATSC) for the transmission of digital television (DTV) to consumers in the United States and other adopting countries.
  • 8-VSB (8-level vestigial sideband) - 8-VSB (8-level vestigial sideband) is a standard radio frequency (RF) modulation format chosen by the Advanced Television Systems Committee (ATSC) for the transmission of digital television (DTV) to consumers in the United States and other adopting countries.
  • 802.11 - 802.11 is an evolving family of specifications for wireless local area networks (WLANs) developed by a working group of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE).
  • 802.11 Fast Guide - This table lists highlights of the most popular sections of IEEE 802 and has links for additional information on wireless standards.
  • 802.11a - 802.11a is one of several specifications in the 802.
  • 802.11ac (Gigabit Wi-Fi) - 802.11ac, also known as Gigabit Wi-Fi, is a proposed specification in the 802.
  • 802.11ad - 802.11ad, also called WiGig 1.
  • 802.11b - The 802.11b standard for wireless local area networks (WLANs) - often called Wi-Fi - is part of the 802.
  • 802.11d - 802.11d is a communications specification for use in countries where systems using other standards in the 802.
  • 802.11e - 802.11e is a proposed enhancement to the 802.
  • 802.11g - The 802.11g specification is a standard for wireless local area networks WLANs) that offers wireless transmission over relatively short distances at up to 54 megabits per second (Mbps), compared with the 11 Mbps theoretical maximum with the earlier 802.
  • 802.11h - The 802.11h specification is an addition to the 802.
  • 802.11i - 802.11i is a standard for wireless local area networks (WLANs) that provides improved encryption for networks that use the popular 802.
  • 802.11j - The 802.11j specification is a proposed addition to the 802.
  • 802.11k - 802.11k is a proposed standard for a series of measurement requests and reports involving channel selection, roaming, transmit power control (TPC), and subscriber statistics in 802.
  • 802.11m - 802.11m is an initiative to perform editorial maintenance, corrections, improvements, clarifications, and interpretations relevant to documentation for 802.
  • 802.11n - 802.11n is an addition to the 802.
  • 802.11s - 802.11s is a proposed amendment to the 802.
  • 802.11u - 802.11u is an amendment to the IEEE 802.
  • 802.11x - 802.11x refers to a group of evolving wireless local area network (WLAN) standards that are under development as elements of the IEEE 802.
  • 802.15 - 802.15 is a communications specification that was approved in early 2002 by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Standards Association (IEEE-SA) for wireless personal area networks (WPANs).
  • 802.16 - 802.16 is a group of broadband wireless communications standards for metropolitan area networks (MANs) developed by a working group of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE).
  • 802.16a - 802.16a is a wireless communications specification for metropolitan area networks (MANs).
  • 802.16c - 802.16c is a set of clarifications and updates to the 102.
  • 802.1X - The 802.1X standard is designed to enhance the security of wireless local area networks (WLANs) that follow the IEEE 802.
  • 802.3 - 802.3 is a standard specification for Ethernet, a method of physical communication in a local area network (LAN), which is maintained by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE).
  • 802.5 - A token ring network connects computers in a ring or star topology to prevent the collision of data between two computers sending messages simultaneously.
  • 86 DOS - QDOS was the forerunner of DOS (Disk Operating System), the first widely-used personal computer operating system.
  • 86-DOS - QDOS was the forerunner of DOS (Disk Operating System), the first widely-used personal computer operating system.
  • 8a firm - In defense contracting, a Certified 8(a) Firm is a firm that is eligible to receive eligible to receive federal contracts under the Small Business Administration's 8(a) Business Development Program because it is owned and operated by socially and economically disadvantaged individuals.
  • 8X - In compact disc (CD) and digital versatile disc (DVD) technology, X is a base multiplier that expresses the speed with which data could be read (the read access time) from the compact disc in its original version, which was 150 kilobytes (KB) per second.
  • 9000 - (For the business server line from Hewlett-Packard, see HP 9000.
  • 911 - In the United States, E911 (Enhanced 91 is support for wireless phone users who dial 911, the standard number for requesting help in an emergency.
  • 96-minute rule - The 96-minute rule is a productivity guideline derived from the Pareto principle.
  • 9660 - An ISO 9660 file system is a standard CD-ROM file system that allows you to read the same CD-ROM whether you're on a PC, Mac, or other major computer platform.
  • 99.999 - In computers, 99.
  • 99.999 (Five nines or Five 9s) - In computers, 99.
  • @ - On the Internet, @ (pronounced "at" or "at sign" or "address sign") is the symbol in an e-mail address that separates the name of the user from the user's Internet address, as in this hypothetical e-mail address example: msmuffet@tuffet.
  • client side framework - There are two sides to web development – the server side and the client side.
  • credential theft - Credential theft is a type of cybercrime that involves stealing the proof of identity of the victim, which can be either an individual or a business.

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