Browse Definitions :

Browse Definitions by Alphabet

FIR - FLY

  • First Amendment of the Internet - Net neutrality is the concept of an open, equal internet for everyone, regardless of content consumed or the device, application or platform used.
  • First Amendment to the Constitution - The First Amendment to the United States Constitution is one of a group of ten additions to the original document that provided a framework for law within the country.
  • first call resolution - In customer relationship management (CRM), first call resolution is properly addressing the customer's need the first time they call, thereby eliminating the need for the customer to follow up with a second call.
  • first call resolution (FCR) - In customer relationship management (CRM), first call resolution is properly addressing the customer's need the first time they call, thereby eliminating the need for the customer to follow up with a second call.
  • first computer virus - Elk Cloner was the first computer virus known to have spread in the wild.
  • first follower theory - First follower theory is the concept that attracting an adherent to some kind of view or initiative is the first step toward beginning a movement, no matter how unusual or out-of-step with the surrounding culture it may seem to the general population.
  • first in first out - In computer programming, FIFO (first-in, first-out) is an approach to handling program work requests from queues or stacks so that the oldest request is handled next.
  • first-order logic - First-order logic is symbolized reasoning in which each sentence, or statement, is broken down into a subject and a predicate.
  • first-order predicate calculus - Power over Ethernet (PoE) is a technology for implementing wired Ethernet local area networks (LANs) that enables the electrical current necessary for operating each device to be carried by Ethernet data cables instead of standard electrical power cords and wiring.
  • first-person view (FPV) - First-person view (FPV), also known as first-person point of view (POV), is the ability of the user of some technology to see from a particular visual perspective other than one's actual location, such as the environment of a character in a video game, a drone, or a telemedicine client.
  • fiscal quarter - A fiscal quarter is one of the four three-month periods that make up an organization’s fiscal year.
  • fiscal year - A fiscal year is the twelve-month period that an organization uses for budgeting, forecasting and reporting.
  • fishbone diagram (Ishikawa cause and effect) - A fishbone diagram is a visualization tool for categorizing the potential root causes of a problem.
  • fishing - Phishing is a form of fraud in which an attacker masquerades as a reputable entity or person in email or other communication channels.
  • FISMA - The Federal Information Security Management Act (FISMA) is United States legislation that defines a framework of guidelines and security standards to protect government information, operations and assets.
  • fist of five - Fist to five, also called fist of five, is a technique used by agile software development teams to poll team members and help achieve consensus.
  • fist to five - Fist to five, also called fist of five, is a technique used by agile software development teams to poll team members and help achieve consensus.
  • fist to five (fist of five) - Fist to five, also called fist of five, is a technique used by agile software development teams to poll team members and help achieve consensus.
  • Five Eyes Alliance - The Five Eyes Alliance (abbreviated as FVEY in government documents) is a cooperative intelligence network that monitors the electronic communications of citizens and foreign governments.
  • Five Steps to Incident Management in a Virtualized Environment - Incident management (IM) is a necessary part of a security program.
  • fix - A software patch or fix helps resolve issues that crop up in different programs.
  • FIX protocol - The Financial Information Exchange (FIX) protocol is an open specification intended to streamline electronic communications in the financial securities industry.
  • FIX protocol (Financial Information Exchange protocol) - The Financial Information Exchange (FIX) protocol is an open specification intended to streamline electronic communications in the financial securities industry.
  • fixed data - Fixed data (sometimes referred to as permanent data) is data that is not, under normal circumstances, subject to change.
  • fixed data (permanent data, reference data, archival data, or fixed-content data) - Fixed data (sometimes referred to as permanent data) is data that is not, under normal circumstances, subject to change.
  • fixed length subnet mask - A fixed-length subnet mask (FLSM) is a sequence of numbers of unchanging length that streamlines packet routing within the subnets of a proprietary network.
  • fixed mobile convergence - Fixed-mobile convergence (FMC) is the trend towards seamless connectivity between fixed and wireless telecommunications networks.
  • fixed price - A fixed price is a non-negotiable sum charged for a product, service or piece of work.
  • fixed price contract - A fixed-price contract, also known as a lump sum contract, is an agreement between a vendor or seller and a client that stipulates goods and/or services that will be provided and the price that will be paid for them.
  • fixed wireless - Fixed wireless networking refers to the operation of wireless devices in fixed locations such as homes and offices.
  • fixed-content data - Fixed data (sometimes referred to as permanent data) is data that is not, under normal circumstances, subject to change.
  • fixed-length subnet mask - A fixed-length subnet mask (FLSM) is a sequence of numbers of unchanging length that streamlines packet routing within the subnets of a proprietary network.
  • fixed-length subnet mask (FLSM) - A fixed-length subnet mask (FLSM) refers to a type of enterprise or provider networking where a block of IP addresses is divided into multiple subnets of equal length (i.
  • fixed-mobile convergence - Fixed-mobile convergence (FMC) is the trend towards seamless connectivity between fixed and wireless telecommunications networks.
  • fixed-mobile convergence (FMC) - Fixed-mobile convergence (FMC) is the trend towards seamless connectivity between fixed and wireless telecommunications networks.
  • Fizt - Fizt (pronounced FIZZ-tee, and short for physics tool) is an animation program that can speed up the production of special effects -- in some cases by a factor of more than 150 to 1 -- and can also make the effects appear more life-like than has been possible with less sophisticated programs.
  • Fizt (physics tool) - Fizt (pronounced FIZZ-tee, and short for physics tool) is an animation program that can speed up the production of special effects -- in some cases by a factor of more than 150 to 1 -- and can also make the effects appear more life-like than has been possible with less sophisticated programs.
  • flag - In programming, a flag is a predefined bitor bit sequence that holds a binary value.
  • flaky test - A flaky test is a quality assurance (QA) test that fails to produces consistent results.
  • flamebait - On the Internet, flamebait is a "posting" or note on a Web site discussion forum, an online bulletin board, a Usenet newsgroup, or other public forum that is intended to elicit the extremely strong responses characteristic of flaming and active public discussions.
  • flaming - On the Internet, flaming is giving someone a verbal lashing in public.
  • FLAPE - FLAPE (flash plus tape) is an approach to tiered storage that allows administrators to archive data as soon as it is written.
  • Flash - Flash, a popular authoring software developed by Macromedia, is used to create vector graphics-based animation programs with full-screen navigation interfaces, graphic illustrations, and simple interactivity in an antialiased, resizable file format that is small enough to stream across a normal modem connection.
  • flash controller (flash memory controller) - A flash controller is the part of solid-state flash memory that communicates with the host device and manages the flash file system directory.
  • Flash cookie - Flash cookies, also known as local shared objects (LSO), are text files stored on a user’s hard drive when a browsers requests content that's supported by Adobe Flash.
  • Flash drive - A USB flash drive -- also known as a stick, thumb or pen drive -- is a plug-and-play portable storage device that uses flash memory and can attach to a keychain.
  • flash drive - A flash solid state drive (SSD)  is a non-volatile storage device that stores persistent data in flash memory.
  • flash file system - Flash file systems are designed specifically for memory devices.
  • flash memory - Flash memory, also known as flash storage, is a type of nonvolatile memory that erases data in units called blocks.
  • flash memory - Flash storage memory cards use nonvolatile semiconductor memory to store pictures, audio and video data on portable and remote devices.
  • flash memory card - Flash storage memory cards use nonvolatile semiconductor memory to store pictures, audio and video data on portable and remote devices.
  • flash memory card - Flash storage memory cards use nonvolatile semiconductor memory to store pictures, audio and video data on portable and remote devices.
  • flash RAM - Flash memory, also known as flash storage, is a type of nonvolatile memory that erases data in units called blocks.
  • flash rob - A flash rob (or flash robbery) is a crime in which a large group of people - usually teenagers - converges to steal items from a store and then disperses as suddenly as they gathered.
  • flash rob (flash robbery) - A flash rob (or flash robbery) is a crime in which a large group of people - usually teenagers - converges to steal items from a store and then disperses as suddenly as they gathered.
  • flash robbery - A flash rob (or flash robbery) is a crime in which a large group of people - usually teenagers - converges to steal items from a store and then disperses as suddenly as they gathered.
  • flash storage - Flash storage is any type of drive, repository or system that uses flash memory to keep data for an extended period of time.
  • flash-based solid state drive (SSD) - A flash solid state drive (SSD)  is a non-volatile storage device that stores persistent data in flash memory.
  • FlashMob supercomputer - A FlashMob supercomputer is a group of computer enthusiasts who gather together in one physical location for a brief time period in order to function as a supercomputer and work on a single problem.
  • flat address space - 1. A flat address space is a set of addresses arranged on a single level.
  • flat backup - Flat backup uses snapshots to protect data without traditional backup software.
  • flat design - Flat design is a simple, graphic style common in user interface (UI), software and Web design.
  • flat file - A flat file is a collection of data stored in a two-dimensional database in which similar yet discrete strings of information are stored as records in a table.
  • flat file system - A flat file system is a system of files in which every file in the system must have a different name.
  • Flat-panel TV Guide - Benefits of flat-panel TVs | Flat-panel features to considerA quick comparison of LCD, LED, OLED and plasma TVsFlat-panel TV technologies: LCD | LED | Plasma | OLEDMore informationA flat-panel TV is a television set that uses one of several different technologies for display in a flat, thin format.
  • fleet management - Fleet management is an administrative approach that allows companies to organize and coordinate work vehicles with the aim to improve efficiency, reduce costs, and provide compliance with government regulations.
  • fleet management software - Fleet management software is an application that helps companies organize, manage and coordinate work vehicles from a central information system to keep the overall fleet operation running smoothly.
  • Flex - Flex is an open source program designed to automatically and quickly generate scanners, also known as tokenizers, which recognize lexical patterns in text.
  • flexfield - In an Oracle environment, a flexfield is a database field that has flexibility built into it so that users can define reporting structures that are relevant to their specific organizations.
  • flexible display - A flexible display or foldable tech/smartphone is a visual output surface on a device that is designed to be folded or closed like a book or a device which incorporates such a screen.
  • flexible workforce - A flexible workforce is one that grows in number to meet needs at any given time and falls back to a baseline number when the increased size is no longer necessary.
  • flexo - Flexography, sometimes referred to as "surface printing," is a method commonly used for printing on packaging and other uneven surfaces.
  • flexography - Flexography, sometimes referred to as "surface printing," is a method commonly used for printing on packaging and other uneven surfaces.
  • flexography (surface printing) - Flexography, sometimes referred to as "surface printing," is a method commonly used for printing on packaging and other uneven surfaces.
  • flip chip pin grid array - FC-PGA (flip chip-pin grid array) is a microchip design developed by Intel for its faster microprocessors in which the hottest part of the chip is located on the side that is away from the motherboard.
  • flip chip-pin grid array - FC-PGA (flip chip-pin grid array) is a microchip design developed by Intel for its faster microprocessors in which the hottest part of the chip is located on the side that is away from the motherboard.
  • flip flops - Flip-flops, also called bistable gates, are digital logic circuits that can be in one of two states.
  • flip flops (bistable gates) - Flip-flops, also called bistable gates, are digital logic circuits that can be in one of two states.
  • flip-flop - Sequential logic is a form of binary circuit design that employs one or more inputs and one or more outputs, whose states are related by defined rules that depend, in part, on previous states.
  • flipping the classroom - Flipping the classroom is a teaching method that uses active learning techniques to engage students rather than traditional lectures alone.
  • float (project float, slack) - In project management, float or slack is the time span between the completion of the last task on the critical path and the finish date for the project.
  • floating gate transistor (FGT) - A floating gate transistor (FGT) is a complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology capable of holding an electrical charge in a memory device that is used to store data.
  • floating point operations per second - In computers, FLOPS are floating-point operations per second.
  • floating-point operations per second - In computers, FLOPS are floating-point operations per second.
  • flooding (network) - In a computer network, flooding occurs when a router uses a non-adaptive routing algorithm to send an incoming packet to every outgoing link except the node on which the packet arrived.
  • FLOP - In computers, FLOPS are floating-point operations per second.
  • floppy - A diskette is a random access, removable data storage medium that can be used with personal computers.
  • floppy disk - A diskette is a random access, removable data storage medium that can be used with personal computers.
  • FLOPS - In computers, FLOPS are floating-point operations per second.
  • FLOPS (floating-point operations per second) - In computers, FLOPS are floating-point operations per second.
  • FLOSS - Free and open source software (FOSS), also known as free/libre open source software (FLOSS) and free/open source software (F/OSS), is software developed by informal collaborative networks of programmers and end users.
  • flow (psychology) - Flow, in the context of psychology, is a state of intense engagement, focus and contentment in the present moment and current activity.
  • flow control - Flow control is the management of data flow between computers or devices or between nodes in a network so that the data can be handled at an efficient pace.
  • flow routing - Flow routing is a network routing technology that takes variations in the flow of data into account to increase routing efficiency.
  • flowchart - A flowchart is a formalized graphic representation of a logic sequence, work or manufacturing process, organization chart, or similar formalized structure.
  • FlowVisor - FlowVisor is an experimental software-defined networking controller that enables network virtualization by slicing a physical network into multiple logical networks.
  • FLSM - A fixed-length subnet mask (FLSM) is a sequence of numbers of unchanging length that streamlines packet routing within the subnets of a proprietary network.
  • flux - Flux is the presence of a force field in a specified physical medium, or the flow of energy through a surface.
  • FLV file format - FLV is a file format used by Adobe Flash Player and Adobe AIR for storing and delivering synchronized audio and video streams.
  • fly-out menu - A menu is a set of options presented to the user of a computer application to help the user find information or execute a program function.
SearchCompliance
  • ISO 31000 Risk Management

    The ISO 31000 Risk Management framework is an international standard that provides businesses with guidelines and principles for ...

  • pure risk

    Pure risk refers to risks that are beyond human control and result in a loss or no loss with no possibility of financial gain.

  • risk reporting

    Risk reporting is a method of identifying risks tied to or potentially impacting an organization's business processes.

SearchSecurity
  • What is cyber hygiene and why is it important?

    Cyber hygiene, or cybersecurity hygiene, is a set of practices individuals and organizations perform regularly to maintain the ...

  • Pretty Good Privacy (PGP)

    Pretty Good Privacy or PGP was a popular program used to encrypt and decrypt email over the internet, as well as authenticate ...

  • email security

    Email security is the process of ensuring the availability, integrity and authenticity of email communications by protecting ...

SearchHealthIT
SearchDisasterRecovery
  • What is risk mitigation?

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

  • fault-tolerant

    Fault-tolerant technology is a capability of a computer system, electronic system or network to deliver uninterrupted service, ...

  • synchronous replication

    Synchronous replication is the process of copying data over a storage area network, local area network or wide area network so ...

SearchStorage
  • information lifecycle management (ILM)

    Information lifecycle management (ILM) is a comprehensive approach to managing an organization's data and associated metadata, ...

  • WORM (write once, read many)

    In computer media, write once, read many, or WORM, is a data storage technology that allows data to be written to a storage ...

  • direct access

    In computer storage, direct access is the process of reading and writing data on a storage device by going directly to where the ...

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