Browse Definitions :

Enterprise resource planning (ERP)

Terms related to business, including definitions about project management and words and phrases about human resources, finance and vertical industries.

SPI - UNK

  • SPI model - SPI is an acronym for the most common cloud computing service models, software as a service, platform as a service and infrastructure as a service.
  • SPIF (sales performance incentive fund) - A SPIF(sales performance incentive fund) is a financial incentive that encourages a sales representative to sell a specific item or group of items.
  • spin (PR, marketing) - Spin, in the context of public relations (PR) and journalism, is the selective assembly of fact and the shaping of nuance to support a particular view of a story.
  • spiral model - The spiral model is a systems development lifecycle (SDLC) method used for risk management that combines the iterative development process model with elements of the waterfall model.
  • spreadsheet controls - Spreadsheet controls are a set of steps that an organization's accounting personnel can take to ensure accuracy and integrity of financial records and bookkeeping procedures.
  • stacked ranking - Stacked ranking is an employee evaluation method that slots a certain percentage of employees into each of several  levels of performance.
  • stakeholder - A stakeholder is a person or group who has an interest -- vested or otherwise -- in an enterprise and whose support is required in order for an enterprise to be successful.
  • standardization - Standardization is the process of developing, promoting and possibly mandating standards-based and compatible technologies within a given industry.
  • startup company - A startup company is a newly formed business with particular momentum behind it based on perceived demand for its product or service.
  • startup culture - Startup culture refers to how people within a new business, or startup, work together.
  • statement of work (SOW) - A statement of work (SOW), in project management, is a document in which a contracting officer or chief procurement officer (CPO) specifies the objectives and deliverables for a particular project or service contract.
  • statutory reporting - Statutory reporting is the mandatory submission of financial and non-financial information to a government agency.
  • steering committee - A steering committee is a group of high-level advisors who have been appointed to provide an organization or project with direction.
  • stop loss order - A stop loss order is a market order that sets a minimum value, below which an investment broker sells a stock or other security at the next available time.
  • storyboard - A storyboard is a graphic organizer that provides the viewer with a high-level view of a project.
  • strategic inflection point - A strategic inflection point is a time period when significant change in the business environment requires an organization to respond effectively or face deterioration.
  • strategic innovation - Strategic innovation is a company's process of reinventing its corporate strategy to encourage growth, create value for the company and its customers, and gain competitive differentiation.
  • strategic leadership - Strategic leadership is a practice in which executives, using different styles of management, develop a vision for their organization that enables it to adapt to or remain competitive in a changing economic and technological climate.
  • strategic management - Strategic management is the ongoing planning, monitoring, analysis and assessment of all necessities an organization needs to meet its goals and objectives.
  • strategic planning - Strategic planning is the process executives undertake in order to make thoughtful decisions about their organization’s mission, values and goals, and properly allocate resources to fulfill those directives.
  • strategic sourcing - Strategic sourcing is an approach to supply chain management that formalizes the way information is gathered and used so that an organization can leverage its consolidated purchasing power to find the best possible values in the marketplace.
  • Strunk's rules - Here is a list of the seven elementary rules of English usage and 11 elementary principles of composition from William Strunk, Jr.
  • subcontract - A subcontract is a contract between a prime contractor and a subcontractor to furnish supplies or services for the performance of a prime contract or subcontract.
  • subscription management - Subscription management is the process of overseeing and controlling all aspects of products and services sold repeatedly through a weekly, monthly, quarterly or yearly subscription-based pricing model.
  • subsidiary - A subsidiary is a business that is wholly or partially owned by another business, sometimes called the parent company or holding company.
  • succession planning - Succession planning is the process of developing talent to replace executive, leadership or other key employees when they transition to another role, leave the company, are fired, retire or die.
  • sugging - Sugging, also spelled SUGGing, is an acronym that stands for "selling under the guise” of research.
  • sunk cost (SC) - A sunk cost is money that has already been spent and cannot be recovered.
  • sunk cost effect - The sunk cost effect is the tendency for humans to continue investing in something that clearly isn’t working.
  • sunsetting - Sunsetting, in a business context, is intentionally and gradually phasing something out.
  • Supplier performance management (SPM) - Supplier performance management (SPM) is a blanket term for any business practice that is designed to manage, measure and analyze the performance of a supplier or suppliers in a network.
  • supplier risk management - Supplier risk management is the process of identifying, assessing and controlling threats to an organization's capital and earnings that are caused by the organization's supply chain.
  • supply and demand - The laws of supply and demand are the observed relationships between the amount of something that is available for purchase, the level of desire consumers have to buy it and the price.
  • supply chain (SC) - A supply chain (SC) is the network of all the individuals, organizations, resources, activities and technology involved in the creation of a product from source materials and its eventual delivery to the end user.
  • supply chain analytics - Supply chain analytics is the application of mathematics, statistics, predictive modeling and machine-learning techniques to find meaningful patterns and knowledge in order, shipment and transactional and sensor data.
  • supply chain finance - Supply chain finance is a set of technology-enabled business and financial processes that provides flexible payment options for a buyer (such as a manufacturer) and one of their suppliers (for example, a raw materials supplier), typically through the services of a financial institution at lower financing costs.
  • Supply Chain Operations Reference (SCOR) - Supply Chain Operations Reference (SCOR) is the process reference model used across industries as a supply chain management diagnostic tool.
  • supply chain risk management (SCRM) - Supply chain risks include cost volatility, material shortages, supplier financial issues and disasters.
  • supply chain security - Supply chain security is the part of supply chain management (SCM) that focuses on minimizing risk for supply chain, logistics and transportation management systems (TMS).
  • supply chain sustainability (SCS) - Supply chain sustainability (SCS) is a holistic view of supply chain processes, logistics and technologies that affect the environmental, social, economic and legal aspects of a supply chain's components.
  • supply chain transformation - Supply chain transformation is the addition and integration of technology to improve supply chain performance.
  • supply chain visibility (SCV) - Supply chain visibility (SCV) is the ability of parts, components or products in transit to be tracked from the manufacturer to their final destination.
  • sustainability risk management (SRM) - Sustainability risk management (SRM) is a business strategy that aligns profit goals with a company's environmental policies.
  • sustainable procurement - Sustainable procurement is the meeting of business needs for materials, goods, utilities and services in an environmentally-friendly, responsible and ethical way.
  • SWIFT FIN message - SWIFT FIN is a message type (MT) that transmits financial information from one financial institution to another.
  • swivel chair interface - A swivel chair interface is a system for user input and interaction that requires them to move from one interface to another, sometimes duplicating work.
  • SWOT analysis (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats analysis) - SWOT analysis (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats analysis) is a framework for identifying and analyzing the internal and external factors that can have an impact on the viability of a project, product, place or person.
  • synectics - Synectics is a method of problem-solving that focuses on cultivating creative thinking, often among small groups of individuals with diverse experience and skills.
  • SYSPRO - SYSPRO is a vendor that specializes in providing ERP and other integrated business software to midsize manufacturers and distributors.
  • systemic risk - Systemic risk is a category of risk that describes threats to a system, market or economic segment.
  • systems development life cycle (SDLC) - The systems development life cycle (SDLC) is a conceptual model used in project management that describes the stages involved in an information system development project, from an initial feasibility study through maintenance of the completed application.
  • systems of engagement - Systems of engagement are decentralized IT components that incorporate communication technologies such as social media to encourage and enable peer interaction.
  • systems thinking - Systems thinking is a holistic approach to analysis that focuses on the way that a system's constituent parts interrelate and how systems work over time and within the context of larger systems.
  • T-shaped employee - A T-shaped employee, in the context of human resources, is an individual who has a depth of knowledge as well as skills in a particular area of specialization.
  • talent pipeline - A talent pipeline is a pool of candidates who are ready to fill a position.
  • targeted ad (targeted advertising) - A targeted ad, in online marketing, is an advertisement that is served to a specific audience, which could be a particular demographic, a group or an individual.
  • Tata Consultancy Services (TCS) - Tata Consultancy Services (TCS) is India's top software and services exporter.
  • technology-assisted review (TAR) - Technology-assisted review (TAR) uses software to search and sort through documents that are relevant for the purposes of e-discovery.
  • telecom cloud provider - A telecom cloud provider is a telecommunications company that has shifted a significant part of its business from landline service to devote resources to providing cloud services.
  • Telecom Regulatory Authority of India (TRAI) - Telecom Regulatory Authority of India (TRAI) is an independent regulatory body established by the Telecom Regulatory Authority of India Act 1997 to oversee the telecommunications industry in India.
  • telepresence room - A telepresence room is a conference space dedicated to high-end videoconferencing.
  • Theory of Constraints (TOC) - The Theory of Constraints (TOC) is a philosophy of management and continuous improvement originally developed by Dr.
  • third party - A third party is an entity that is involved in some way in an interaction that is primarily between two other entities.
  • thought leader (thought leadership) - A thought leader is a person who or organization that is widely recognized as an expert in a given field and whose opinions are in high demand.
  • tier 1 vendor - A tier 1 vendor is one of the largest and most well known in its field -- often enjoying national or international recognition and acceptance.
  • tier 2 vendor - A tier 2 vendor is a smaller and less well-known provider as compared to a tier 1 vendor and is often also limited in its geographic coverage as well.
  • time management - Time management is the coordination of people's tasks and activities to maximize the effectiveness of their efforts.
  • time series chart - A time series chart, also called a times series graph or time series plot, is a data visualization tool that illustrates data points at successive intervals of time.
  • time to value (TtV) - Time to value (TtV) is a business term that describes the period of time between a request for a specific value and the initial delivery of the value requested.
  • time value of money - Time value of money is the concept that money acquired sooner or held onto longer has a greater worth or potential worth due to the possible accumulation of interest or ROI while that money is saved or invested.
  • timeboxing - A timebox is a strictly-enforced limit on how long a given task or project can take: There is no allowance made for the possibility of extension.
  • timeline - A timeline is the presentation of a chronological sequence of events along a drawn line that enables a viewer to understand temporal relationships quickly.
  • TIN (Taxpayer Identification Number) - A Taxpayer Identification Number (TIN), in the United States, is a unique nine-digit number for identifying an individual, business or other entity in tax returns and additional documents filed with the Internal Revenue Service (IRS).
  • tl;dr (TL;DR) - TL;DR is an abbreviation for "too long; didn't read" that is used to indicate that the person posting about an article either didn't read it in its entirety or didn't read it at all.
  • tooling - Tooling, also known as machine tooling, is the process of acquiring the manufacturing components and machines needed for production.
  • top line - Top line is a number that represents a company’s gross revenue or sales from products or services; this figure is so-named because it appears at the top of an income statement.
  • total benefit of ownership (TBO) - Total benefit of ownership is the sum of measurable and intangible returns that a company receives from investing in assets and/or personnel.
  • Total Quality Management (TQM) - Total Quality Management is a management framework based on the belief that an organization can build long-term success by having all its members, from low-level workers to its highest ranking executives, focus on quality improvement and, thus, delivering customer satisfaction.
  • Toyota Way - The Toyota Way is a comprehensive expression of the company's management philosophy, which is based on the two foundational principles of Continuous Improvement (kaizen) and Respect for People.
  • traceability - Traceability, in supply chain management, is the ability to identify, track and trace elements of a product or substance as it moves along the supply chain from raw goods to finished products.
  • tragedy of the commons - The tragedy of the commons is a problem that occurs when individuals exploit a shared resource to the extent that demand overwhelms supply and the resource becomes unavailable to some or all.
  • transactional leadership - Transactional leadership is a leadership style where the executive relies on rewards and punishments to achieve optimal job performance from his or her subordinates.
  • transactional marketing - Transactional marketing is a business strategy that focuses on single, "point of sale" transactions.
  • transfer learning - Transfer learning is the application of knowledge gained from completing one task to help solve a different, but related, problem.
  • transformational leadership - Transformational leadership describes the ability of an organization's management to foster significant change, often by leveraging new technology.
  • transparency - Transparency, in the context of governance, means being open and honest in all official activities.
  • Transportation Management System (TMS) - A transportation management system (TMS) is specialized software for planning, executing and optimizing the shipment of goods.
  • treasury management - Treasury management is the administration of a company’s cash flow as well as the creation and governance of policies and procedures that ensure the company manages risk successfully.
  • triple bottom line (3BL) - The triple bottom line (3BL) is an expanded version of the business concept of the bottom line that includes social and environmental results as well as financial results.
  • triple constraint - The project management triangle is also known as the triple constraint, the project management triple constraint and the the iron triangle.
  • TurboTax - TurboTax is tax preparation software for United States and Canadian tax returns.
  • turnkey solution provider - A turnkey solution provider is a solution provider that offers limited consultation and one or more established product packages that allow only minimal configuration.
  • two pizza rule - The two pizza rule is a guideline for limiting the number of attendees at a meeting.
  • two-speed IT - Two-speed IT is the concept that strategic planning for an IT department should include a fast track that allows some projects to be implemented quickly.
  • U.K. Data Protection Act 1998 (DPA 1998) - The Data Protection Act 1998 (DPA 1998) is an act of the United Kingdom (UK) Parliament defining the ways in which information about living people may be legally used and handled.
  • unconference - An unconference is a conference organized, structured and led by the people attending it.
  • undercapitalization - Undercapitalization is a situation when an organization lacks the availability of funds needed to conduct regular business.
  • Unfreeze, Change, Refreeze (Kurt Lewin Change Management Model) - Unfreeze, Change, Refreeze, also known as the Kurt Lewin Change Management Model, is a method for managing change within an organization.
  • unicorn - A unicorn, in an investment context, is a tech startup that is assessed at a valuation of $1 billion or more.
  • unique selling point (USP) - A unique selling proposition (USP, also seen as unique selling point) is a factor that differentiates a product from its competitors, such as the lowest cost, the highest quality or the first-ever product of its kind.

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  • PCI DSS (Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard)

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  • risk management

    Risk management is the process of identifying, assessing and controlling threats to an organization's capital and earnings.

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    Disaster recovery as a service (DRaaS) is the replication and hosting of physical or virtual servers by a third party to provide ...

  • cloud disaster recovery (cloud DR)

    Cloud disaster recovery (cloud DR) is a combination of strategies and services intended to back up data, applications and other ...

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