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Enterprise resource planning (ERP)

Terms related to business, including definitions about project management and words and phrases about human resources, finance and vertical industries.

CVO - ENT

  • CVO (Chief Visionary Officer) - The Chief Visionary Officer (CVO) is a newer title where the holder is expected to have a broad and comprehensive knowledge of all matters related to the business of the organization, as well as the vision required to steer its course into the future.
  • cycle counting - Cycle counting is an inventory-control method that lets businesses conduct a regular count of several items in different areas in a warehouse, without constantly adding up the entire inventory.
  • CYOD (choose your own device) - CYOD (choose your own device) is an alternative model to BYOD (bring your own device) that involves allowing employees to select the device they want from among a limited number of options.
  • daily stand-up meeting - A daily stand-up meeting is a short organizational meeting that is held early each day.
  • data artist - A data artist is a business analytics (BA) specialist who creates graphs, charts, infographics and other visual tools that help people understand complex data.
  • Data as a Service (DaaS) - Data as a Service (DaaS) is an information provision and distribution model in which data files (including text, images, sounds, and videos) are made available to customers over a network, typically the Internet.
  • data broker (information broker) - A data broker, also called an information broker or information reseller, is a business that collects personal information about consumers and sells that information to other organizations.
  • data currency (data as currency) - Data currency is monetary value assigned to data so that it can be used as the unit of exchange in a transaction either as the sole payment or in combination with money.
  • data historian - A data historian is a software program that records the data created by processes running in a computer system.
  • data modeling - Data modeling is the process of creating a simplified diagram of a software system and the data elements it contains, using text and symbols to represent the data and how it flows.
  • data monetization - Data monetization is the act of measuring the economic benefit of corporate data.
  • data point - A data point is a discrete unit of information.
  • data products - A data product is digital information that can be purchased.
  • days inventory outstanding (DIO) - Days inventory outstanding (DOI) is the average number of days it takes for inventory to be sold.
  • days sales outstanding (DSO) - Days sales outstanding (DSO) is the measurement of the average number of days it takes a business to collect payments after a sale has been made.
  • deal registration - Deal registration is a common feature of vendors' channel partner programs in which a channel partner, such as a value-added reseller (VAR), informs the vendor about a sales lead.
  • decision fatigue - Decision fatigue is a state of reduced efficacy in decision making after an excessive number of decisions or a number of decisions with excessive options.
  • decision management - Decision management is a process or set of processes for prioritizing, improving and streamlining action items.
  • decision tree - A decision tree is a graph that uses a branching method to illustrate every possible output for a specific input.
  • Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) - Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) is a program run by the United States Department of Homeland Security which allowed specific illegal immigrants who came to the country as children, known as Dreamers, to defer removal action for two years, a time period which could then be renewed.
  • Dell EMC Partner Program - The Dell EMC Partner Program is an international channel partner program that provides partners with business development, sales and marketing resources.
  • demand generation (demand gen) - Demand generation (demand gen) is an umbrella term for customer acquisition initiatives that are designed to drive awareness and interest about a company’s product or service in order to attract qualified leads.
  • demand planning - Demand planning is the process of forecasting the demand for a product or service so it can be produced and delivered more efficiently and to the satisfaction of customers.
  • demand shaping - Demand shaping is an operational supply chain management (SCM) strategy where a company uses tactics such as price incentives, cost modifications and product substitutions to entice customers to purchase specific items.
  • demand-driven manufacturing (DDM) - Demand-driven manufacturing (DDM) is an approach to manufacturing where production is based on actual orders rather than forecasts.
  • deputy CIO (deputy chief information officer) - Deputy CIO is a role within some organizations that generally has responsibility for overseeing day-to-day IT operations.
  • descriptive modeling - Descriptive modeling is a mathematical process that describes real-world events and the relationships between factors responsible for them.
  • design thinking - Design thinking is an iterative approach to problem solving that intentionally seeks out people with different perspectives, knowledge, skills and experience and has them work together to create a practical solution for a real-world problem.
  • design-centric culture - A design-thinking culture is responsive to customer's needs.
  • DevOps 2.0 - DevOps 2.0 is the extension of DevOps practices through the entire organization, beyond development and IT ops.
  • digital accessibility - Digital accessibility is the ability of a website, mobile application or electronic document to be easily navigated and understood by a wide range of users, including those users who have visual, auditory, motor or cognitive disabilities.
  • digital core - Digital core is the technology platforms and applications that allow organizations to transform into digital businesses and meet the new needs of the digital economy.
  • digital disruption - Digital disruption is the change that occurs when new digital technologies and business models affect the value proposition of existing goods and services.
  • digital economy - The digital economy is the worldwide network of economic activities, commercial transactions and professional interactions that are enabled by information and communications technologies.
  • digital enterprise - Digital enterprise is an organization that leverages digital technology as a competitive advantage in its internal and external operations.
  • digital labor - Digital labor is work that is performed by robotic process automation (RPA) systems.
  • digital leadership - Digital leaders work in much the same way as a chief financial officer (CFO), a director of human resources or a chief operations officer (COO) works; they need to assure interested parties that the assets for which they are responsible maintain maximum value.
  • digital manufacturing - Digital manufacturing is a technology-based approach to production that links different data silos and processes in the manufacturing lifecycle so that stakeholders can make better business decisions both comprehensively and at each step.
  • digital marketing - Digital marketing involves the various efforts by a company to connect with customers through digital and online communication channels, including email, geolocation and mobile marketing, social media, online customer communities, webinars and other video-based content.
  • digital profiling - Digital profiling is the process of gathering and analyzing information about an individual that exists online.
  • digital signage ROI - Digital signage ROI is the return on investments made on digital signage used to advertise and attract customer attention or communicate information.
  • digital strategy (digital media strategy) - A digital strategy is a blueprint for managing customer-facing information technology (IT) initiatives.
  • digital supply chain - A digital supply chain is a supply chain whose foundation is built on Web-enabled capabilities to fully capitalize on connectivity, system integration and the information-producing capabilities of "smart" connected products.
  • digital thread - Digital thread is a communication framework that connects traditionally siloed elements in manufacturing processes and provides an integrated view of an asset throughout the manufacturing lifecycle.
  • digital trust - Digital trust is the confidence users have in the ability of people, technology and processes to create a secure digital world.
  • digital twin - A digital twin is a virtual representation of a product or workflow across its lifecycle.
  • digital workplace - The digital workplace is the concept that businesses should use digital transformation (DX) to align technology, employees and business processes to improve operational efficiency and meet organizational goals.
  • direct competition - Direct competitors are businesses that offer products or services that are essentially the same; as such, they are vying for the same potential market.
  • direct digital marketing (DDM) - Direct digital marketing (DDM) is the electronic delivery of relevant communications to specific recipients.
  • direct market reseller (DMR) - A direct market reseller (DMR), also known as an e-tailer, is a company that sells directly to consumers online without operating storefront operations of any kind.
  • direct marketing - Direct marketing is a type of advertising campaign that seeks to elicit an action (such as an order, a visit to a store or website or a request for further information) from a selected group of consumers in response to communication from a marketer.
  • Director of First Impressions - Director of First Impressions is a job title that is increasingly replacing that of receptionist.
  • disambiguation - Disambiguation (also called word sense disambiguation) is the act of interpreting the intended sense or meaning of a word.
  • disaster recovery (DR) test - A disaster recovery test (DR test) is the examination of each step in a disaster recovery plan as outlined in an organization's business continuity/disaster recovery (BCDR) planning process.
  • disaster recovery plan (DRP) - A disaster recovery plan (DRP) is a documented, structured approach that describes how an organization can quickly resume work after an unplanned incident.
  • discrete manufacturing - Discrete manufacturing is an industry term for the manufacturing of finished products that are distinct items capable of being easily counted, touched or seen.
  • disruptive innovation - Disruptive innovation is the introduction of a product or service into an established industry that performs better and, generally, at a lower cost than existing offerings, thereby displacing the market leaders in that particular market space and transforming the industry.
  • disruptive technology - A disruptive technology is one that displaces an established technology and shakes up the industry or a ground-breaking product that creates a completely new industry.
  • distance learning (e-learning) - Distance learning, sometimes called e-learning, is a formalized teaching and learning system specifically designed to be carried out remotely by using electronic communication.
  • distributed control system (DCS) - A distributed control system (DCS) is a digital automated industrial control system (ICS) that uses geographically distributed control loops throughout a factory, machine or control area.
  • distribution center - A distribution center is a product storage and shipping building that stores goods a company produces.
  • distribution requirements planning (DRP) - Distribution requirements planning (DRP) is a time-based systematic process to make the delivery of goods more efficient by determining which goods, in what quantities, and at what location are required to meet anticipated demand.
  • distributor agreement (distribution agreement) - A distributor agreement, also known as a distribution agreement, is a contract between channel partners that stipulates the responsibilities of both parties.
  • DMADV - DMADV is a process defined by Motorola as part of their Six Sigma management philosophy.
  • DMAIC (define, measure, analyze, improve, control) - DMAIC (define, measure, analyze, improve, control) is Six Sigma tool for improving an existing process.
  • dogfood - Dogfood is an expression that means to use the product or service that you are trying to sell.
  • dollarization - Dollarization is the adoption of a foreign country’s currency as legal tender for monetary transactions.
  • driver-based planning - Driver-based planning is an approach to management that identifies an organization's key business drivers and creates a series of business plans that mathematically model how those things most necessary for the organization's success would be affected by different variables.
  • dropshipping - Dropshipping is an e-commerce retail model that allows stores to sell products without keeping any physical inventory.
  • dual sourcing - Dual sourcing is the supply chain management practice of using two suppliers for a given component, raw material, product or service.
  • due diligence - Due diligence definition: Due diligence is the process of systematically researching and verifying the accuracy of a particular statement.
  • dynamic BPM (business process management) - Dynamic business process management (BPM) is an approach designed to allow business processes to adjust quickly to changing business needs.
  • dynamic case management (DCM) - Dynamic case management (DCM) is the handling of case-based work through the use of technologies that automate and streamline aspects of each case.
  • dynamic pricing - The goal of dynamic pricing is to allow a company that sells goods or services over the Internet to adjust prices on the fly in response to market demands.
  • e-business (electronic business) - E-business (electronic business) is the conduct of business processes on the internet.
  • e-filing (electronic filing) - E-filing is the electronic submission of information that is required by law.
  • e-prescribing (eRx) incentive program - The Electronic Prescribing (eRx) Incentive Program is a US government program that provides financial incentives to physicians, practitioners and therapists who meet certain criteria for the use of qualified e-prescribing systems.
  • e-recruitment (e-recruiting) - E-recruitment is an umbrella term for any electronic-based recruiting and recruitment management activity.
  • E-stop - E-stop (emergency stop) is a simple, highly visible button designed to shut down operations on heavy and/or dangerous equipment.
  • EDGAR - EDGAR (Electronic Data Gathering, Analysis, and Retrieval) is an online public database from the U.
  • electric grid - An electric grid is a network of synchronized power providers and consumers that are connected by transmission and distribution lines and operated by one or more control centers.
  • electronic publishing on demand (EPOD) - Electronic publishing on demand (EPOD) is the use of a digital printer to create a book.
  • embedded IT - Embedded IT is the process of inserting information technology staff and expertise into other business units in order to quickly and more effectively identify and pursue new business opportunities and increase the likelihood that IT projects are deployed successfully.
  • emergency communications plan (EC plan) - An emergency communications plan (EC plan) provides guidelines, contact information and procedures for how information should be shared should a crisis that requires immediate action occur.
  • emergency management plan - An emergency management plan should include measures that provide for the safety of personnel and, if possible, property and facilities.
  • emergency notification system - Emergency notification systems contain names, addresses, phone numbers and email addresses so crucial information can be communicated to employees during a disaster.
  • emotional intelligence (EI) - Emotional intelligence (EI) is the area of cognitive ability that facilitates interpersonal behavior.
  • employee advocacy - Employee advocacy is the promotion of an organization by its staff members.
  • employee assistance program (EAP) - An employee assistance program (EAP) is an arrangement between a corporation, academic institution or government agency and its employees that provides a variety of support programs for the employees.
  • employee churn - Employee churn is the overall turnover in an organization's staff as existing employees leave and new ones are hired.
  • employee engagement - Employee engagement is the emotional connection an employee experiences that results in a willingness to expend discretionary effort at work.
  • employee life cycle - Employee life cycle -- also spelled employee lifecycle -- is an HR model that identifies the different stages a worker advances through in an organization in, as well as the role HR plays in optimizing that progress.
  • employee onboarding and offboarding - Employee onboarding and offboarding are two core HR activities that are gaining in importance.
  • employee productivity - Employee productivity is an assessment of the efficiency of a worker or group of workers.
  • end of life (EOL) - End of life (EOL), in the context of manufacturing and product lifecycles, is the final stages of a product’s existence.
  • engineering bill of materials (EBOM) - An engineering bill of materials (EBOM) is a product recipe structured from the design standpoint, rather than the manufacturing standpoint.
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  • pure risk

    Pure risk refers to risks that are beyond human control and result in a loss or no loss with no possibility of financial gain.

  • risk reporting

    Risk reporting is a method of identifying risks tied to or potentially impacting an organization's business processes.

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    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

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    Synchronous replication is the process of copying data over a storage area network, local area network or wide area network so ...

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