Browse Definitions :

Enterprise resource planning (ERP)

Terms related to business, including definitions about project management and words and phrases about human resources, finance and vertical industries.

ENT - HIG

  • Enterprise 2.0 - Enterprise 2.
  • enterprise architecture framework - An enterprise architecture framework (EA framework) is the collection of processes, templates and tools that are used to create an enterprise architecture (EA).
  • enterprise document management (EDM) - Enterprise document management (EDM) is a strategy for overseeing an organization's paper and electronic documents so they can be easily retrieved in the event of a compliance audit or subpoena.
  • enterprise IT (enterprise-class IT) - Enterprise IT, also known as enterprise-class IT, is hardware and software designed to meet the demands of a large organization.
  • enterprise mobility - Enterprise mobility is an approach to work in which employees can do their jobs from anywhere using a variety of devices and applications.
  • enterprise search - There are a number of kinds of enterprise search including local installations, hosted versions, and search appliances, sometimes called “search in a box.
  • enterprise social networking - Enterprise social networking is an organization's use of social media, internally and externally, to connect individuals who share similar business interests or activities.
  • entity-relationship model (ERM or ER model) - The entity-relationship model (or ER model) is a way of graphically representing the logical relationships of entities (or objects) in order to create a database.
  • Epicor Software Corp. - Epicor Software Corp.
  • equity crowdfunding - Equity crowdfunding is a variation on the crowdsource model that offers contributors the ability to purchase stock in a business.
  • ergonomics - Ergonomics (from the Greek word "ergon" meaning work, and "nomoi" meaning natural laws), is the science of refining the design of products to optimize them for human use.
  • Erlang B - Erlang B is a modeling formula that is widely used in call center scheduling.
  • ERP (enterprise resource planning) - ERP, or enterprise resource planning, is software designed to manage and integrate the functions of core business processes like finance, HR, supply chain and inventory management in a single system.
  • ERP finance module - The ERP finance module is the software component that handles the main accounting and financial management functions of an enterprise resource planning system.
  • executive leadership - Executive leadership is the ability of an organization's management to guide and motivate employees while meeting organizational goals.
  • executive sponsor - An executive sponsor is a C-level administrator who has a vested interest in seeing a project to completion.
  • exit interview - An exit interview is a meeting between management representatives and someone who is leaving an organization.
  • exit strategy - An exit strategy is a planned approach to terminating a situation in a way that will maximize benefit or minimize damage.
  • express consent - Express consent is permission for something that is given specifically, either verbally or in writing.
  • extended enterprise - Extended enterprise is the concept that a company does not operate in isolation because its success is dependent upon a network of partner relationships.
  • extension strategy - An extension strategy is a practice used to increase profitability for a given product or service and thus keep it in the maturity phase of the marketing product lifecycle rather than going into decline.
  • factor of safety (FoS) - Factor of safety (FoS) is ability of a system's structural capacity to be viable beyond its expected or actual loads.
  • fail fast - Fail fast is a philosophy that values the development or implementation of many small experimental products, changes or approaches before committing large amounts of time or resources.
  • fair and reasonable price - A fair and reasonable price is the price point for a good or service that is fair to both parties involved in the transaction.
  • Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) - The Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) is United States federal legislation that promotes accuracy, fairness and privacy for data used by consumer reporting agencies.
  • fake news - Fake news is an inaccurate, sometimes sensationalistic report that is created to gain attention, mislead, deceive or damage a reputation.
  • FASAB (Federal Accounting Standards Advisory Board) - The Federal Accounting Standards Advisory Board (FASAB) is an advisory committee that develops accounting standards for U.
  • Fast Guide to acronyms used in manufacturing - These acronyms are often used in internal communications within a manufacturing environment.
  • FCC (Federal Communications Commission) - The FCC (Federal Communications Commission) is the government body responsible for maintaining laws, censorship and broadcast licensing pertaining to interstate and international communications in the United States.
  • fever chart - A fever chart is a graphical representation showing change of a variable over time.
  • financial analytics - Financial analytics is the creation of ad hoc analysis to answer specific business questions and forecast possible future financial scenarios.
  • financial consolidation - Financial consolidation is the process of combining financial data from several departments or business entities within an organization, usually for reporting purposes.
  • financial controller - A financial controller, also referred to as financial comptroller, is a senior-level executive who usually reports to an organization's chief financial officer (CFO).
  • financial data management - Financial data management (FDM) is a process and policy, usually assisted by specialized software, that allows an enterprise or institution to consolidate its financial information, maintain compliance with accounting rules and laws, and produce detailed financial reports.
  • Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) - The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) is an independent regulator securities firms doing business in the United States.
  • financial management system - A financial management system is the methodology and software that an organization uses to oversee and govern its income, expenses, and assets with the objectives of maximizing profits and ensuring sustainability.
  • financial modeling - Financial modeling is the construction of spreadsheet models that illustrate a company's likely financial results in quantitative terms.
  • financial planning and analysis (FP&A) - Financial planning and analysis (FP&A) is the budgeting, forecasting and analytical processes that support an organization's financial health and business strategy.
  • financial reporting - Financial reporting is the process of producing the reports, called statements, that disclose an organization's financial status to management, investors and the U.
  • financial supply chain management - Financial supply chain management (FSCM) is a set of software tools and processes designed to enhance an organization’s product flow, maximizing profitability and minimizing expenses.
  • finite capacity scheduling - In manufacturing, finite capacity scheduling is an approach to understanding how much work can be produced in a certain time period, taking limitations on different resources into consideration.
  • FinOps (FinOps Foundation) - FinOps (financial operations) is a framework for managing operating expenditures (Opex) in the cloud.
  • FinTech - FinTech (a portmanteau of financial tech) is the use of new technology and delivery models to complement or compete with traditional financial service delivery processes.
  • fiscal quarter - A fiscal quarter is one of the four three-month periods that make up an organization’s fiscal year.
  • fiscal year - A fiscal year is the twelve-month period that an organization uses for budgeting, forecasting and reporting.
  • fishbone diagram (Ishikawa cause and effect) - A fishbone diagram is a visualization tool for categorizing the potential root causes of a problem.
  • fixed price - A fixed price is a non-negotiable sum charged for a product, service or piece of work.
  • fixed price contract - A fixed-price contract, also known as a lump sum contract, is an agreement between a vendor or seller and a client that stipulates goods and/or services that will be provided and the price that will be paid for them.
  • flexible workforce - A flexible workforce is one that grows in number to meet needs at any given time and falls back to a baseline number when the increased size is no longer necessary.
  • flipping the classroom - Flipping the classroom is a teaching method that uses active learning techniques to engage students rather than traditional lectures alone.
  • float (project float, slack) - In project management, float or slack is the time span between the completion of the last task on the critical path and the finish date for the project.
  • FMEA (failure mode and effective analysis) - FMEA (failure mode and effective analysis) is a step-by-step approach for collecting knowledge about possible points of failure in a design, manufacturing process, product or service.
  • format war - A format war is a competition for market dominance -- and often survival -- between two or more producers of a particular type of product.
  • Fortune 500 - The Fortune 500 is Fortune Magazine's annual ranking of the United States' 500 largest corporations.
  • four eyes principle - The four eyes principle is a requirement that two individuals review and approve some action before it can be taken.
  • fractional CIO - A fractional CIO is a high-level consultant who specializes in aligning information technology (IT) with business goals.
  • framing effect - Framing effect is a form of cognitive bias which causes people to focus more on the positive or negative aspects of a decision, situation or information based on the way it is presented.
  • freemium - Freemium is a way of promoting services by offering the basic features at no cost, charging a premium only for supplemental features.
  • frictionless commerce - Frictionless commerce is a method of using data from devices, apps and websites to integrate buying opportunities as simply and seamlessly as possible into consumers’ everyday activities and natural environments.
  • Fulfillment by Amazon (FBA) - Fulfillment by Amazon (FBA) is an advanced service in which third-party vendors store their products in Amazon’s fulfillment centers and the e-commerce giant picks, sorts, packs, ships, keeps records, and handles returns and refunds for these products.
  • fulfillment center - A fulfillment center is a warehouse where incoming orders are received, processed and filled.
  • funnel analysis - Funnel analysis is a way to measure and improve the performance of customer interactions in a step-wise progression from the initial customer contact to a predetermined conversion metric.
  • G-code - G-code (also known as RS-274) is the name of the most prevalent programming language for computer numerical control (CNC) in computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM).
  • GAAP (generally accepted accounting principles) - GAAP (pronounced "gap"), which stands for "generally accepted accounting principles," is a collection of commonly followed accounting rules and standards for financial reporting.
  • gazumping - Gazumping is when a seller accepts an offer from a buyer only to accept an increased offer from another buyer and sells to the second party.
  • GDSN (Global Data Synchronization Network) - GDSN (Global Data Synchronization Network) is an internet-based network that enables trading partners to exchange product-identification data in a standardized way in real time.
  • Genchi Genbutsu - Genchi Genbutsu is the Japanese principle of going to and directly observing a location and its conditions in order to understand and solve any problems faster and more effectively.
  • general ledger (GL) - A general ledger (GL) is a set of numbered accounts a business uses to keep track of its financial transactions and to prepare financial reports.
  • Generation Z - Generation Z is the demographic cohort following Generation Y -- which is more popularly known as the Millennial Generation.
  • geo-marketing - Geo-marketing is a tool that uses geographic, or location-based, information to help companies put together marketing strategies and campaigns.
  • geotargeting - Geotargeting is the practice of customizing an advertisement for a product or service to a specific market based on the geographic location of potential buyers.
  • ghost asset - A ghost asset is a fixed asset in a general ledger (GL) that cannot be accounted for because it is physically missing or otherwise rendered unusable.
  • gift economy - A gift economy is one in which services or goods are given without an agreement as to a suitable payment or trade to be made in return.
  • gig economy - A gig economy is a free market system in which temporary positions are common and organizations hire independent workers for short-term commitments.
  • globalization - Globalization is the process by which ideas, goods and services spread throughout the world.
  • GMP (good manufacturing practice) - A good manufacturing practice (GMP) is one that conforms to the guidelines set by the regulatory agencies that control authorization and licensing for the production and sale of food, beverages and active pharmaceutical products.
  • go-live (go live) - Go-live is the time at which something becomes available for use.
  • go-to-market strategy (GTM strategy) - A go-to-market strategy (GTM strategy) is an action plan that specifies how a company will reach target customers and achieve competitive advantage.
  • gold plating - Gold plating is the practice of making changes to a project that are outside of the original agreed-upon scope.
  • goldbricking - Goldbricking is wasting time on the job.
  • golden handcuffs - Golden handcuffs are a type of financial incentives designed to motivate employees to stay with a company longer than they might otherwise do.
  • golden parachute - A golden parachute is a severance agreement that provides an executive with a substantial package upon termination, usually in the event of a takeover or merger.
  • Google Adsense - Google AdSense is a program in which enterprises can display Google advertisements on Web sites and earn revenue from hits that generate traffic for the Google search engine s.
  • Google Trends - Google Trends is a free service provided by Google that displays how often specific keywords, subjects and phrases have been searched for on Google over a period of time.
  • GR/IR clearing accounts - A GR/IR (goods-receipt/invoice-receipt) clearing account is a bookkeeping device that can be used when goods arrive before the invoice is generated, or when an invoice arrives before the goods are delivered.
  • great recession (Great Recession) - Great recession is a label used by journalists and  economists to describe a severe, prolonged economic downturn.
  • green IT (green information technology) - Green IT (green information technology) is the practice of environmentally sustainable computing.
  • green procurement - Green procurement is a continuous commitment to start-to-finish process management with consideration for environmental impact in business activities used to meet needs for materials, goods, utilities and services.
  • greenwashing - Greenwashing is the practice of making an unsubstantiated or misleading claim about the environmental benefits of a product, service, technology or company practice.
  • gross domestic product (GDP) - Gross domestic product (GDP) is the total amount of dollars made within a given location in the selling of all goods and services before deductions.
  • gross revenue - Gross revenue is the total of all money generated by a business, without taking into account any part of that total that has been or will be used for expenses.
  • group think - Group think (also spelled groupthink) is a phenomenon that occurs when group's need for consensus supersedes the judgment of individual group members.
  • Groupon - Groupon is a marketing service that offers its subscribers daily discount coupons by email, Facebook and Twitter feeds.
  • growth hacker - A growth hacker is a marketing professional with high-level IT skills.
  • growth potential - Growth potential is an organization's future ability to generate larger profits, expand its workforce and ramp up its production.
  • GS1 - GS1 is a global, not-for-profit association that maintains standards for barcodes and RFID tags and for supply chain messaging such as Electronic Data Interchange (EDI).
  • guaranteed income - Guaranteed income is an umbrella term for a number of models designed to deliver funds to a given population.
  • hard skills - Hard skills are specific abilities, or capabilities, that an individual can possess and demonstrate in a measured way.
  • Hardware as a Service (HaaS) - Hardware as a Service (HaaS) is a service provision model for hardware that is defined differently in managed services and grid computing contexts.
  • Hardware as a Service (in grid computing) - Hardware as a Service (Haas), in a grid computing context, is a pay-as-you-go model for accessing a provider's infrastructure and CPU power.
SearchCompliance
  • ISO 31000 Risk Management

    The ISO 31000 Risk Management framework is an international standard that provides businesses with guidelines and principles for ...

  • pure risk

    Pure risk refers to risks that are beyond human control and result in a loss or no loss with no possibility of financial gain.

  • risk reporting

    Risk reporting is a method of identifying risks tied to or potentially impacting an organization's business processes.

SearchSecurity
SearchHealthIT
SearchDisasterRecovery
  • What is risk mitigation?

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

  • fault-tolerant

    Fault-tolerant technology is a capability of a computer system, electronic system or network to deliver uninterrupted service, ...

  • synchronous replication

    Synchronous replication is the process of copying data over a storage area network, local area network or wide area network so ...

SearchStorage
Close