Browse Definitions :

Circuit switched services equipment and providers

Terms related to circuit switched services equipment and providers, including dedicated communications channel definitions and words and phrases about telecommunications.

AUT - WAN

  • automated speech recognition (ASR) - Automated speech recognition (ASR) is a technology that allows users of information systems to speak entries rather than punching numbers on a keypad.
  • B-channel (bearer channel) - In the Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN), the B-channel is the channel that carries the main data.
  • bit error rate (BER) - In telecommunication transmission, the bit error rate (BER) is the percentage of bits that have errors relative to the total number of bits received in a transmission, usually expressed as ten to a negative power.
  • bit stuffing - Bit stuffing refers to the insertion of one or more bits into a data transmission as a way to provide signaling information to a receiver.
  • bits per second (bps or bit/sec) - In data communications, bits per second (bps or bit/sec) is a common measure of data speed for computer modems and transmission carriers.
  • black box (black box testing) - Black box testing assesses a system solely from the outside, without the operator or tester knowing what is happening within the system to generate responses to test actions.
  • cable head-end - A cable head-end (or headend) is the facility at a local cable TV office that originates and communicates cable TV services and cable modem services to subscribers.
  • callback (international callback) - Callback, also known as international callback, is a system for avoiding regular phone company long-distance charges by having a call initiated from within the United States with the originating caller joining in a conference call.
  • carrier network - A telecommunications carrier network is the collection of devices and underlying infrastructure used to transmit data from one location to another.
  • centrex (central office exchange service) - Centrex (central office exchange service) is a service from local telephone companies in the United States in which up-to-date phone facilities at the phone company's central (local) office are offered to business users so that they don't need to purchase their own facilities.
  • channel - In telecommunications in general, a channel is a separate path through which signals can flow.
  • circuit - In electronics, a circuit is a path between two or more points along which an electrical current can be carried.
  • Cisco Enterprise Agreement (EA) - Cisco Enterprise Agreement (EA) is a software buying program that digitizes and simplifies license management for Cisco suite customers.
  • CLEC (competitive local exchange carrier) - In the United States, a CLEC (competitive local exchange carrier) is a telephone company that competes with the already established local telephone business by providing its own network and switching.
  • colocation (colo) - A colocation facility, or colo, is a data center facility in which a business can rent space for servers and other computing hardware.
  • connection - In telecommunication and computing in general, a connection is the successful completion of necessary arrangements so that two or more parties (for example, people or programs) can communicate at a long distance.
  • customer proprietary network information (CPNI) - Customer proprietary network information (CPNI) in the United States is information that telecommunications services -- such as local, long-distance and wireless telephone companies -- acquire about their subscribers.
  • D-channel - In the Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN), the D-channel is the channel that carries control and signalling information.
  • dedicated line - A dedicated line is a telecommunications path between two points that is available 24 hours a day for use by a designated user (individual or company).
  • demarc (demarcation point) - A demarc (an abbreviation for demarcation point) marks the point where communications facilities owned by one organization interface with that of another organization.
  • dial peer (addressable call endpoint) - A dial peer, also known as an addressable call endpoint, is a device that can originate or receive a call in a telephone network.
  • Direct Inward Dialing (DID) - Direct Inward Dialing (DID) is a service of a local phone company (or local exchange carrier) that provides a block of telephone numbers for calling into a company's private branch exchange (PBX) system.
  • DSLAM (Digital Subscriber Line Access Multiplexer) - A DSLAM (Digital Subscriber Line Access Multiplexer) is a network device, usually at a telephone company central office, that receives signals from multiple customer Digital Subscriber Line (DSL) connections and puts the signals on a high-speed backbone line using multiplexing techniques.
  • duplex - In telecommunication, duplex communication means that both ends of the communication can send and receive signals at the same time.
  • E-carrier system - To see the relationship between the E-carrier system, the T-carrier system, and DS0 multiples, see digital signal X.
  • E.164 - E.164 is an international numbering plan for public telephone systems in which each assigned number contains a country code (CC), a national destination code (NDC), and a subscriber number (SN).
  • E911 (Enhanced 911) - In the United States, E911 (Enhanced 91 is support for wireless phone users who dial 911, the standard number for requesting help in an emergency.
  • electronic program guide (EPG) - An electronic program guide (EPG) is an application used with digital set-top boxes and newer television sets to list current and scheduled programs that are or will be available on each channel and a short summary or commentary for each program.
  • Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (EIGRP) - Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (EIGRP) is a network protocol that enables routers to exchange information more efficiently than earlier network protocols, such as Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (IGRP) or Border Gateway Protocol (BGP).
  • erlang - The Erlang programming language is not the same thing as the erlang, a unit of traffic density.
  • EWSD (Electronic Worldwide Switch Digital) - EWSD (Electronic Worldwide Switch Digital, or, in German, Elektronisches WaehlSystem [Digital]) is a widely-installed telephonic switch system developed by Siemens.
  • fabric - In information technology, fabric is a synonym for the words framework or platform.
  • fax - A fax (short for facsimile and sometimes called telecopying) is the telephonic transmission of scanned-in printed material (text or images), usually to a telephone number associated with a printer or other output device.
  • FDDI (Fiber Distributed Data Interface) - FDDI (Fiber Distributed Data Interface) is a network standard that uses fiber optic connections in a local area network (LAN) that can extend in range up to 200 kilometers (124 miles).
  • FG-D (Feature Group D) - FG-D (Feature Group D) is a type of telecommunication trunk used to provide "equal access" capability from telecommunication carriers and central offices (where the switching equipment is located and customer lines are connected and terminated) to the access tandem.
  • Fibre Channel Arbitrated Loop (FC-AL) - A Fibre Channel Arbitrated Loop (FC-AL) is a high-speed Fibre Channel (FC) topology that can connect up to 126 ports on one controller using a one-way loop or hub design.
  • frame - See frames for the use of multiple Web pages on a single display screen.
  • frequency-division multiplexing (FDM) - In frequency-division multiplexing (FDM), multiple signals are combined for transmission on a single communications line or channel, with each signal assigned to a different frequency (subchannel) within the main channel.
  • frequency-shift keying (FSK) - Frequency-shift keying (FSK) is a method of transmitting digital signals using discrete signals.
  • Gbps (billions of bits per second) - Gbps stands for billions of bits per second and is a measure of bandwidth on a digital data transmission medium such as optical fiber.
  • gigaflop - As a measure of computer speed, a gigaflop is a billion floating-point operations per second (FLOPS).
  • half-duplex - Half-duplex data transmission means that data can be transmitted in both directions on a signal carrier, but not at the same time.
  • hop off - Hop off is a term used in telecommunications that refers to a point at which a signal or call leaves a network and moves to another network.
  • hundred call second or centum call second (CCS) - The hundred call second -- also known as the centum call second (CCS) -- is a unit of telecommunications traffic density that is the equivalent of one call (including call attempts and holding time) in a specific channel for 100 seconds in an hour.
  • ILEC (incumbent local exchange carrier) - An ILEC (incumbent local exchange carrier) is a telephone company in the U.
  • in-band signaling - In the public switched telephone network, (PSTN), in-band signaling is the exchange of signaling (call control) information on the same channel that the telephone call itself is using.
  • Intelligent Network (IN) - Intelligent Network (IN) is a telephone network architecture originated by Bell Communications Research (Bellcore) in which the service logic for a call is located separately from the switching facilities, allowing services to be added or changed without having to redesign switching equipment.
  • interconnection - Interconnection is a strategy for ensuring that businesses can privately, securely and directly exchange digital information.
  • interexchange carrier (IXC) - An interexchange carrier (IXC) is a telephone company that provides connections between local exchanges in different geographic areas.
  • international private leased circuit (IPLC) - An international private leased circuit (IPLC) is a point-to-point private line used by an organization to communicate between offices that are dispersed throughout the world.
  • IP PBX (private branch exchange) - An IP PBX is a private branch exchange (telephone switching system within an enterprise) that switches calls between VoIP (voice over Internet Protocol or IP) users on local lines while allowing all users to share a certain number of external phone lines.
  • jitter - Jitter is any deviation in, or displacement of, the signal pulses in a high-frequency digital signal.
  • jumbo frames - A jumbo frame is an Ethernet frame with a payload greater than the standard maximum transmission unit (MTU) of 1,500 bytes.
  • leased line - A leased line is a bidirectional telephone line that has been rented for private voice, data exchange or telecommunication use.
  • local access and transport area (LATA) - LATA (local access and transport area) is a term in the U.
  • LZW compression - LZW compression is the compression of a file into a smaller file using a table-based lookup algorithm invented by Abraham Lempel, Jacob Ziv, and Terry Welch.
  • managed network services - Managed network services are networking applications, functions and services that enterprises outsource to be remotely operated, monitored and maintained by a managed service provider (MSP).
  • mean opinion score (MOS) - In voice communications, particularly Internet telephony, the mean opinion score (MOS) provides a numerical measure of the quality of human speech at the destination end of the circuit.
  • Microsoft Assessment and Planning (MAP) Toolkit - Microsoft Assessment and Planning (MAP) Toolkit is a free utility IT can use to determine whether or not its infrastructure is prepared for a migration to a new operating system, server version or cloud-based deployment.
  • mobile number portability (MNP) - Mobile number portability (MNP) is a service that allows a cellphone or smartphone customer to change service providers and keep the same phone number.
  • network operations center (NOC) - A network operations center (NOC) is a centralized place from which enterprise information technology (IT) administrators -- either internal or third party -- supervise, monitor and maintain a telecommunications network.
  • network switch - A network switch is a hardware device that channels incoming data from multiple input ports to a specific output port that will take it toward its intended destination.
  • noise - Noise is unwanted electrical or electromagnetic energy that degrades the quality of signals and data.
  • open networking - Open networking describes a network that uses open standards and commodity hardware.
  • operational support system (OSS) - An operational support system (OSS) is a set of programs that help a communications service provider monitor, control, analyze and manage a telephone or computer network.
  • predictive dialer - A predictive dialer is a telephone control system that automatically calls a list of telephone numbers in sequence, screening out no-answers, busy signals, answering machines and disconnected numbers while predicting at what point a human caller will be able to handle the next call.
  • probe - In telecommunications generally, a probe is an action taken or an object used for the purpose of learning something about the state of the network.
  • Q signaling (QSIG) - Q signaling (abbreviated QSIG), a protocol for Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) communications based on the Q.
  • Q.931 - Q.931 (also called Q93 is a signaling protocol for Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) communications that is used in voice over IP (VoIP).
  • quadbit (nibble) - A quadbit, sometimes called a nibble, is one of 16 possible four-bit combinations used in some communication signals.
  • regional Bell operating company (RBOC) - Regional Bell operating company (RBOC) is a term describing one of the U.
  • repeater - In digital communication systems, a repeater is a device that receives a digital signal on an electromagnetic or optical transmission medium and regenerates the signal along the next leg of the medium.
  • ringtone - On mobile phones, a ringtone is a brief audio file played to indicate an incoming call.
  • roaming service - Roaming service is the ability to get access to the Internet when away from home at the price of a local call or at a charge considerably less than the regular long-distance charges.
  • RS-232C - RS-232C is a long-established standard ("C" is the current version) that describes the physical interface and protocol for relatively low-speed serial data communication between computers and related devices.
  • satellite Internet connection - A satellite Internet connection is an arrangement in which the upstream (outgoing) and the downstream (incoming) data are sent from, and arrive at, a computer through a satellite.
  • service-level agreement (SLA) - A service-level agreement (SLA) is a contract between a service provider and its customers that documents what services the provider will furnish and defines the service standards the provider is obligated to meet.
  • shielded twisted pair (STP) - Shielded twisted pair (STP) is a special kind of copper telephone and local area network (LAN) wiring used in some business installations.
  • signal - In electronics, a signal is an electric current or electromagnetic field used to convey data from one place to another.
  • signal-to-noise ratio (S/N or SNR) - In analog and digital communications, a signal-to-noise ratio, often written S/N or SNR, is a measure of the strength of the desired signal relative to background noise (undesired signal).
  • signaling - In telephony, signaling is the exchange of information between involved points in the network that sets up, controls, and terminates each telephone call.
  • Signaling System 7 (SS7) - Signaling System 7 (SS7) is an international telecommunication protocol standard that defines how the network elements in a public switched telephone network (PSTN) exchange information and control signals.
  • Signalling Connection Control Part (SCCP) - Signalling Connection Control Part (SCCP) is a portion of International Telecommunication Union (ITU) recommendation Q.
  • splitter - In telephony, a splitter, sometimes called a "plain old telephone service splitter," is a device that divides a telephone signal into two or more signals, each carrying a selected frequency range, and can also reassemble signals from multiple signal sources into a single signal.
  • Synchronous Digital Hierarchy (SDH) - Synchronous Digital Hierarchy (SDH) is a group of fiber optic transmission rates that transport digital signals with different capacities.
  • T-carrier system - To see the relationship between T-carrier, E-carrier, and DS0 multiples, see digital signal X.
  • T1 (T-1) - Also see the T-carrier system, of which the T1 is a part.
  • TAPI (Telephony Application Program Interface) - TAPI (Telephony Application Program Interface) is a standard program interface that lets you and your computer "talk" over telephones or video phones to people or phone-connected resources elsewhere in the world.
  • teleconference - A teleconference is a telephone meeting among two or more participants involving technology more sophisticated than a simple two-way phone connection.
  • telephone jacks - In the U. S.
  • telephony - Telephony is technology associated with interactive communication between two or more physically distant parties via the electronic transmission of speech or other data.
  • time-division multiplexing (TDM) - Time-division multiplexing (TDM) is a method of putting multiple data streams in a single signal by separating the signal into many segments, each having a very short duration.
  • transit - Transit is the connection to and use of a telecommunication path provided by a vendor.
  • trunk (trunking) - A network trunk is a communications line or link designed to carry multiple signals simultaneously to provide network access between two points.
  • video telephony - Video telephony is full-duplex, real-time audio-visual communication between or among end users.
  • VoIP phone - A VoIP phone is a hardware- or software-based telephone designed to use voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) technology to send and receive phone calls over an IP network.
  • VoIP trunk gateway - A VoIP trunk gateway is an interface that facilitates the use of plain old telephone service (POTS) equipment, such as conventional phone sets and fax machines, with a voice over IP (VoIP) network.
  • WAN (wide area network) - A wide area network (WAN) is a geographically distributed telecommunications network that interconnects multiple local area networks (LANs).
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