Browse Definitions :

Computing fundamentals

Terms related to computer fundamentals, including computer hardware definitions and words and phrases about software, operating systems, peripherals and troubleshooting.

CON - DOC

  • concatenation (concatenate, concatenating) - Concatenation (from Latin concatenare, to link together) is taking two or more separately located things and placing them side-by-side next to each other so that they can now be treated as one thing.
  • concurrent processing - Concurrent processing is a computing model in which multiple processors execute instructions simultaneously for better performance.
  • configuration - Generally, a configuration is the arrangement - or the process of making the arrangement - of the parts that make up a whole.
  • connection - In telecommunication and computing in general, a connection is the successful completion of necessary arrangements so that two or more parties (for example, people or programs) can communicate at a long distance.
  • connectionless - In telecommunication, connectionless describes communication between two network end points in which a message can be sent from one end point to another without prior arrangement.
  • conservation of angular momentum - Conservation of angular momentum is a physical property of a spinning system such that its spin remains constant unless it is acted upon by an external torque; put another way, the speed of rotation is constant as long as net torque is zero.
  • contact center - A contact center -- also referred to as a customer interaction center or e-contact center -- is a central point from which all customer contacts are managed.
  • container (disambiguation) - This page explains how the term container is used in software development, storage, data center management and mobile device management.
  • content - Many people agree that on the World Wide Web, "content is King.
  • content aggregator - A content aggregator is an individual or organization that gathers Web content (and/or sometimes applications) from different online sources for reuse or resale.
  • content filtering (information filtering) - On the Internet, content filtering (also known as information filtering) is the use of a program to screen and exclude from access or availability Web pages or e-mail that is deemed objectionable.
  • content-addressed storage (CAS) - Content-addressed storage (CAS) is a method of providing fast access to fixed content (data that is not expected to be updated) by assigning it a permanent place on disk.
  • contiguous - Contiguous describes two or more objects that are adjacent to each other.
  • continuation symbol - The continuation symbol is used to indicate extension of a sequence or set, or to imply the existence of intermediate elements in a sequence or set.
  • continuous data protection (storage convergence) - Continuous data protection (CDP), also called continuous backup, is a storage system in which all the data in an enterprise is backed up whenever any change is made.
  • controller - A controller, in a computing context, is a hardware device or a software program that manages or directs the flow of data between two entities.
  • cool - On the World Wide Web, cool has a number of meanings, including:EngagingLaid-back, understatedIn tune with the latest thinking, even a little ahead of itTechnically or graphically impressiveThe term "cool" seems to have originated among jazz musicians in the 1940s.
  • Coordinated Universal Time (UTC, GMT, CUT) - Coordinated Universal Time (abbreviated as UTC, and therefore often spelled out as Universal Time Coordinated and sometimes as Universal Coordinated Time) is the standard time common to every place in the world.
  • coordinates - Coordinates are distances or angles, represented by numbers, that uniquely identify points on surfaces of two dimensions (2D) or in space of three dimensions (3D).
  • coprocessor - A coprocessor is a special set of circuits in a microprocessor chip that is designed to manipulate numbers or perform some other specialized function more quickly than the basic microprocessor circuits could perform the same task.
  • copyleft - Copyleft is the idea and the specific stipulation when distributing software that the user will be able to copy it freely, examine and modify the source code, and redistribute the software to others (free or priced) as long as the redistributed software is also passed along with the copyleft stipulation.
  • corollary - A corollary is a statement that follows naturally from some other statement that has either been proven or is generally accepted as true.
  • COTS, MOTS, GOTS, and NOTS - COTS, MOTS, GOTS, and NOTS are abbreviations that describe pre-packaged software or hardware purchase alternatives.
  • counting board - Historically, a counting board was a portable flat surface, usually of wood or stone, on which a user placed objects such as pebbles or beads for the purpose of maintaining a count of something.
  • coupling - Coupling is the act of joining two things together.
  • courseware - Courseware is educational material intended as kits for teachers or trainers or as tutorials for students, usually packaged for use with a computer.
  • Cray Inc. - Cray Inc. is a pioneering computer company that was founded as Cray Research in 1972 by Seymour Cray, who is known as the father of the supercomputer.
  • cross section - A cross section is a cut through something (such as a coaxial cable) at an angle perpendicular to its axis in order to view its interior structure.
  • crumb - In computers, crumb is jargon for two bits (that is, two binary digits).
  • cryptographic nonce - A nonce is a random or semi-random number that is generated for a specific use, typically related to cryptographic communication or information technology.
  • cryptography - Cryptography is a method of protecting information and communications through the use of codes so that only those for whom the information is intended can read and process it.
  • cumulative trauma disorder (CTD) - In information technology, cumulative trauma disorder (CTD) refers to any of several physical problems that can result from improper or excessive use of a computer display or terminal.
  • cursor - A cursor is the position indicator on a computer display screen where a user can enter text.
  • customer data integration (CDI) - Customer data integration (CDI) is the process of defining, consolidating and managing customer information across an organization's business units and systems to achieve a "single version of the truth" for customer data.
  • customer lifecycle - In customer relationship management (CRM), customer lifecycle is a term used to describe the progression of steps a customer goes through when considering, purchasing, using and maintaining loyalty to a product or service.
  • customer-facing - Customer-facing is an adjective used to describe a hardware or software product, technology, or anything that the customer of a business deals with directly.
  • cyber - Cyber is a prefix used to describe a person, thing, or idea as part of the computer and information age.
  • cyberburger joint - A cyberburger joint is a fast-food restaurant that provides Internet access at a computer to its customers.
  • cybercafe - A cybercafe is a cafe, coffee or espresso shop, or similar food and/or beverage-serving place that has a number of personal computers connected to the Internet and available for use by customers.
  • cyberextortion - Cyberextortion is a crime involving an attack or threat of an attack coupled with a demand for money or some other response in return for stopping or remediating the attack.
  • cyberpicketing - Cyberpicketing is the use of the Internet to protest a corporation or other institution's wages, work conditions, products, environmental policy, or other issues.
  • cyberpunk - Cyberpunk is a sensibility or belief that a few outsiders, armed with their own individuality and technological capability, can fend off the tendencies of traditional institutions to use technology to control society.
  • cyberstalking - Cyberstalking is a crime in which the attacker harasses a victim using electronic communication, such as e-mail or instant messaging (IM), or messages posted to a Web site or a discussion group.
  • D - D is one of two programming languages, Digital Mars D, an object-oriented metaprogramming language, or Microsoft D, a key component of the upcoming Oslo development environment.
  • dark energy (quintessence) - Dark energy, also called quintessence, is a mysterious energy or force that has been postulated by astronomers and cosmologists to explain recent observations suggesting that the universe is expanding at an ever-increasing rate of speed.
  • DAT (Digital Audio Tape) - DAT (Digital Audio Tape) is a standard medium and technology for the digitalrecording of audioon tape at a professional level of quality.
  • data - In computing, data is information that has been translated into a form that is efficient for movement or processing.
  • data center - A data center (or datacenter) is a facility composed of networked computers and storage that businesses or other organizations use to organize, process, store and disseminate large amounts of data.
  • data classification - Data classification is the process of organizing data into categories for its most effective and efficient use.
  • data compression - Data compression is a reduction in the number of bits needed to represent data.
  • data glove - A data glove is an interactive device, resembling a glove worn on the hand, which facilitates tactile sensing and fine-motion control in robotics and virtual reality.
  • data in motion - Data in motion, also referred to as data in transit or data in flight, is digital information that is in the process of being transported between locations within or between computer systems.
  • data point - A data point is a discrete unit of information.
  • data restore - Data restore is the process of copying backup data from secondary storage and restoring it to its original location or a new location.
  • data set - A data set is a collection of data that contains individual data units organized (formatted) in a specific way and accessed by one or more specific access methods based on the data set organization and data structure.
  • data storage - Data storage is the collective methods and technologies that capture and retain digital information on electromagnetic, optical or silicon-based storage media.
  • data streaming - Data streaming is the continuous transfer of data at a steady, high-speed rate.
  • data structure - A data structure is a specialized format for organizing, processing, retrieving and storing data.
  • data transfer rate (DTR) - Data transfer rate (DTR) is the amount of digital data that is moved from one place to another in a given time.
  • DB-xx (DB-9, DB-15, DB-25, DB-50, DB-68) - DB-xx is the designation for a series of port connectors for attaching devices to computers.
  • de facto standard - A de facto standard is something that is used so widely that it is considered a standard for a given application although it has no official status.
  • de jure standard - A de jure standard is a technology, method or product that has been officially endorsed for a given application.
  • dead media - In 1995, science-fiction writer Bruce Sterling challenged a conference of computer artists and the world at large to help identify the extinct species in the new media taxonomy and face the fact that, for each new medium or technology that survives, dozens fall by the wayside.
  • deadlock - A deadlock is a situation in which two computer programs sharing the same resource are effectively preventing each other from accessing the resource, resulting in both programs ceasing to function.
  • decimal - Decimal is a term that describes the base-10 number system, probably the most commonly used number system.
  • decoupled architecture - In general, a decoupled architecture is a framework for complex work that allows components to remain completely autonomous and unaware of each other.
  • default - In computer technology, a default (noun, pronounced dee-FAWLT) is a predesigned value or setting that is used by a computer program when a value or setting is not specified by the program user.
  • defragmentation - Defragmentation is the process of locating the noncontiguous fragments of data into which a computer file may be divided as it is stored on a hard disk, and rearranging the fragments and restoring them into fewer fragments or into the whole file.
  • degauss - To degauss is to demagnetize.
  • demographics - Demographics is the study of the behaviors and other characteristics of groups of human beings in terms of statistics.
  • Department of Space (India) - The Department of Space (DoS) is a department created by the Indian government to manage their space program and oversee a number of related agencies and institutes.
  • deploy - To deploy (from the French deployer) is "to spread out or arrange strategically.
  • depository - A depository is a file or set of files in which data is stored for the purpose of safekeeping or identity authentication.
  • deprecated - In dictionaries, deprecated is a term used to indicate a pronunciation or usage that is acknowledged but discouraged.
  • design by committee - Design by committee is a term sometimes used to describe a design that is flawed because too many people provided input.
  • desktop - A desktop is a computer display area that represents the kinds of objects one might find on top of a physical desk, including documents, phone books, telephones, reference sources, writing and drawing tools, and project folders.
  • desktop supercomputer (personal supercomputer) - A desktop supercomputer, also called a personal supercomputer, is a term that is used to describe any exceptionally powerful computer that can be placed at a single workstation.
  • desktop theme - A desktop theme is a customized graphical user interface (GUI) that replaces a computer's ordinary sounds, icons, pointer, wallpaper or screensaver with something designed to reflect the interests of the user.
  • device - In general, a device is a machine designed for a purpose.
  • Difference Engine - The Difference Engine, designed in the 1820s by the English mathematician and inventor Charles Babbage, was intended to automatically compute mathematical tables which, until that time, had been tediously calculated by hand and were prone to error.
  • digit - A digit is an element of a set that, taken as a whole, comprises a system of numeration.
  • digital accessibility - Digital accessibility is the ability of a website, mobile application or electronic document to be easily navigated and understood by a wide range of users, including those users who have visual, auditory, motor or cognitive disabilities.
  • digital audio broadcasting (DAB) - .
  • digital cash (eCash) - Digital cash is a system of purchasing cash credits in relatively small amounts, storing the credits in your computer, and then spending them when making electronic purchases over the Internet.
  • digital divide - The term 'digital divide' describes the fact that the world can be divided into people who do and people who don't have access to - and the capability to use - modern information technology, such as the telephone, television, or the Internet.
  • digital library - A digital library is a collection of documents in organized electronic form, available on the Internet or on CD-ROM (compact-disk read-only memory) disks.
  • digital modeling and fabrication - Digital modeling and fabrication is a design and production process that marries 3-D modeling or computing-aided design (CAD) software with additive and subtractive manufacturing.
  • digital printing - Digital printing describes the process of transferring a document on a personal computer or other digital storage device to a printing substrate by means of a device that accepts text and graphic output.
  • digitization - Digitization is the process of converting information into a digital format.
  • digizine - A digizine is a magazine that is delivered in digital (electronic form) on an electronic medium, such as a CD-ROM.
  • Dilbert - Dilbert is a cartoon strip about the workplace that has a wide following among millions of corporate and other workers in the United States.
  • Direct Memory Access (DMA) - Direct Memory Access (DMA) is a capability provided by some computer bus architectures that allows data to be sent directly from an attached device (such as a disk drive) to the memory on the computer's motherboard.
  • direct-attached storage (DAS) - Direct-attached storage (DAS) is computer storage that is connected to one computer and not accessible to other computers.
  • directory - A directory is, in general, an approach to organizing information, the most familiar example being a telephone directory.
  • disaster recovery plan (DRP) - A company's disaster recovery policy is enhanced with a documented DR plan that formulates strategies, and outlines preparation work and testing.
  • discrete - Discrete (pronounced dihs-KREET, from the Latin discretus and perhaps discernere, meaning to separate) is an adjective meaning separate and distinct.
  • disintermediation - Disintermediation is giving the user or the consumer direct access to information that otherwise would require a mediator, such as a salesperson, a librarian, or a lawyer.
  • disk-to-disk-to-tape (D2D2T) - Disk-to-disk-to-tape (D2D2T) is an approach to computer storage backup and archiving in which data is initially copied to backup storage on a disk and then later on copied again to tape.
  • display modes - The term display mode refers to the characteristics of a computer display, in particular the maximum number of colors and the maximum image resolution (in pixels horizontally by pixels vertically).
  • disruptive technology - A disruptive technology is one that displaces an established technology and shakes up the industry or a ground-breaking product that creates a completely new industry.

-ADS BY GOOGLE

SearchCompliance

SearchSecurity

  • computer worm

    A computer worm is a type of malicious software program whose primary function is to infect other computers while remaining ...

  • Single Sign-On (SSO)

    Single sign-on (SSO) is a session and user authentication service that permits a user to use one set of login credentials (e.g., ...

  • Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA)

    Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA) is a certification issued by ISACA to people in charge of ensuring that an ...

SearchHealthIT

SearchDisasterRecovery

  • business continuity plan (BCP)

    A business continuity plan (BCP) is a document that consists of the critical information an organization needs to continue ...

  • disaster recovery team

    A disaster recovery team is a group of individuals focused on planning, implementing, maintaining, auditing and testing an ...

  • cloud insurance

    Cloud insurance is any type of financial or data protection obtained by a cloud service provider. 

SearchStorage

Close