Browse Definitions :

Data transmission

Terms related to data transmission, including definitions about communication channels and words and phrases about point-to-point and point-to-multipoint data transfers.

FOR - PRO

  • forward error correction (FEC) - Forward error correction (FEC) is a method of obtaining error control in data transmission in which the source (transmitter) sends redundant data and the destination (receiver) recognizes only the portion of the data that contains no apparent errors.
  • fractional T1 - A fractional T1 or T3 line is a T1 or T3 digital phone line in the North American T-carrier system that is leased to a customer at a fraction of its data-carrying capacity and at a correspondingly lower cost.
  • frame - See frames for the use of multiple Web pages on a single display screen.
  • free-space optics (FSO) - Free-space optics (FSO), also called free-space photonics (FSP), refers to the transmission of modulated visible or infrared (IR) beams through the atmosphere to obtain broadband communications.
  • frequency modulation (FM) - Also see modulation and frequency-shift keying (FSK).
  • frequency-shift keying (FSK) - Frequency-shift keying (FSK) is a method of transmitting digital signals.
  • Gbps (billions of bits per second) - Gbps stands for billions of bits per second and is a measure of bandwidth on a digital data transmission medium such as optical fiber.
  • GeoRSS - GeoRSS is a method of describing and pinpointing the physical locations of Internet content.
  • geostationary satellite - A geostationary satellite is an earth-orbiting satellite, placed at an altitude of approximately 35,800 kilometers (22,300 miles) directly over the equator, that revolves in the same direction the earth rotates (west to east).
  • gigabit interface converter (GBIC) - A gigabit interface converter (GBIC) is a transceiver that converts electric currents (digital highs and lows) to optical signals, and optical signals to digital electric currents.
  • gigaflop - As a measure of computer speed, a gigaflop is a billion floating-point operations per second (FLOPS).
  • H.264 (MPEG-4 AVC) - H.264, also known as MPEG-4 AVC (Advanced Video Coding), is a video compression standard that offers significantly greater compression than its predecessors.
  • hairpinning - In general telecommunication, hairpinning is returning a message from an origin endpoint back in the direction it came from as a way to get it to its destination endpoint.
  • half-duplex - Half-duplex data transmission means that data can be transmitted in both directions on a signal carrier, but not at the same time.
  • HALO (High Altitude Long Operation) - A HALO (High Altitude Long Operation) aircraft is an aircraft designed to act as a very high altitude receiving and transmitting tower, circling a metropolitan area and providing broadband telecommunication service at data rates up to 5 Mbps to homes and up to 25 Mbps to business users with dedicated lines.
  • Hayes command set - Hayes command set is a specific programming language originally developed for the Hayes Smartmodem 300 baud modem during the late 1970s.
  • hoot-n-holler - In telecommunications, a hoot-n-holler is a dedicated "always on" connection used for two-way business-to-business voice communication.
  • hop off - Hop off is a term used in telecommunications that refers to a point at which a signal or call leaves a network and moves to another network.
  • HTTP/2 protocol - HTTP/2 protocol is the second version of HTTP, a network protocol used to define the format and transmission of data.
  • hundred call second or centum call second (CCS) - The hundred call second -- also known as the centum call second (CCS) -- is a unit of telecommunications traffic density that is the equivalent of one call (including call attempts and holding time) in a specific channel for 100 seconds in an hour.
  • hybrid WAN - A hybrid WAN is a wide area network that sends traffic over two or more connection types.
  • IAX (Inter-Asterisk Exchange Protocol) - IAX (Inter-Asterisk Exchange Protocol, pronounced "eeks") is a communications protocol for setting up interactive user sessions.
  • infrared transmission - Infrared transmission refers to energy in the region of the electromagnetic radiation spectrum at wavelength s longer than those of visible light, but shorter than those of radio.
  • integrated access management (IAM) - Integrated access management (IAM) is a combination of business processes, policies and technologies that allows organizations to provide secure access to confidential data.
  • integrated T1 (channelized T1) - Integrated T1 (also called channelized T is a digital carrier modulation method in which a T1 line is divided into 24 channels, each having a maximum data speed of 64 thousand bits per second (Kbps), and each capable of supporting a unique application that can run concurrently with, but independently of, other applications on different channels.
  • intelligent video - Intelligent video is digital video technology integrated with analytical software.
  • interconnection - Interconnection is a strategy for ensuring that businesses can privately, securely and directly exchange digital information.
  • Internet metering - Internet metering is a service model in which an Internet service provider (ISP) tracks the customer's use of bandwidth and charges accordingly.
  • Internet Routing in Space (IRIS) - Internet Routing in Space in Space, also known as (IRIS), is a project being conducted by the U.
  • inverse multiplexing - Inverse multiplexing speeds up data transmission by dividing a data stream into multiple concurrent streams that are transmitted at the same time across separate channels (such as a T-1 or E-1 lines) and are then reconstructed at the other end back into the original data stream.
  • IPLC (international private leased circuit) - An IPLC (international private leased circuit) is a point-to-point private line used by an organization to communicate between offices that are geographically dispersed throughout the world.
  • IPTV (Internet Protocol television) - IPTV (Internet Protocol television) is a service that provides television programming and other video content using the TCP/IP protocol suite as opposed to traditional cable or satellite signals.
  • IPX (Internetwork Packet Exchange) - IPX (Internetwork Packet Exchange) is a networking protocol from Novell that interconnects networks that use Novell's NetWare clients and servers.
  • isochronous - In information technology, isochronous (from the Greek "equal" and "time"; pronounced "eye-SAH-krun-us") pertains to processes that require timing coordination to be successful, such as voice and digital video transmission.
  • jam - In an Ethernet network, a jam is a signal from one device to all other devices that a collision has occurred.
  • jitter - Jitter is the time variation between when packets leave one system and reach another, affecting real-time communications like VoIP and video conferencing.
  • jumbo frames - A jumbo frame is an Ethernet frame with a payload greater than the standard maximum transmission unit (MTU) of 1,500 bytes.
  • jumbogram - Using the Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6), a jumbogram is a transmission packet that contains a payload larger than 65,535 eight-bit bytes (also known as octet s).
  • Kbps (kilobits per second) - In the U.S.
  • keyphone (K/P or key station) - Commonly used by a company within its private automatic branch exchange (PABX) telephone system, a keyphone (abbreviated as K/P, sometimes called a key station) is a telephone with the extra buttons and the intelligence to allow incoming calls to be transferred to other extensions.
  • layer 3 - Layer 3 refers to the Network layer of the commonly-referenced multilayered communication model, Open Systems Interconnection (OSI).
  • Layer 4-7 (network services) - Layer 4 through Layer 7 are services delivered by the upper layers of the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) communication model.
  • leased line - A leased line is a bidirectional telephone line that has been rented for private voice, data exchange or telecommunication use.
  • local area network (LAN) - A local area network (LAN) consists of computers and peripherals that share a common communications line or wireless link to a server.
  • Local Number Portability (LNP) - Local Number Portability (LNP) is the ability of a telephone customer in the U.
  • Location Routing Number (LRN) - In the U.S.
  • Logical Link Control layer (LCL layer) - The Logical Link Control (LCL) layer is one of two sublayers of the Data-Link layer in the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) model of communication.
  • long-haul optics - Long-haul optics refers to the transmission of visible light signals over optical fiber cable for great distances, especially without or with minimal use of repeaters.
  • loopback - In telephone systems, a loopback is a test signal sent to a network destination that is returned as received to the originator.
  • loopback test - A loopback test is a test in which a signal in sent from a communications device and returned (looped back) to it as a way to determine whether the device is working right or as a way to pin down a failing node in a network.
  • LZW compression - LZW compression is the compression of a file into a smaller file using a table-based lookup algorithm invented by Abraham Lempel, Jacob Ziv, and Terry Welch.
  • managed file transfer (MFT) - Managed file transfer (MFT) is a type of software used to provide secure internal, external and ad-hoc data transfers through a network.
  • Manchester encoding - In data transmission, Manchester encoding is a form of digital encoding in which data bits are represented by transitions from one logical state to the other.
  • master/slave - In computer networking, master/slave is a model for a communication protocol in which one device or process (known as the master) controls one or more other devices or processes (known as slaves).
  • MDI/MDIX (medium dependent interface/MDI crossover) - MDI/MDIX is a type of Ethernet port connection using twisted pair cabling.
  • mean opinion score (MOS) - In voice communications, particularly Internet telephony, the mean opinion score (MOS) provides a numerical measure of the quality of human speech at the destination end of the circuit.
  • Media Access Control layer (MAC layer) - In the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) model of communication, the Media Access Control layer is one of two sublayers of the Data Link Control layer and is concerned with sharing the physical connection to the network among several computers.
  • mesh network topology (mesh network) - A mesh network is a network in which the devices -- or nodes -- are connected so that at least some, and sometimes all, have multiple paths to other nodes.
  • MFSK (multiple frequency shift keying) - MFSK (multiple frequency shift keying), also called multi-frequency shift keying, is a method of signal modulation in which discrete audio tone bursts of various frequencies convey digital data.
  • Microsoft Assessment and Planning (MAP) Toolkit - Microsoft Assessment and Planning (MAP) Toolkit is a free utility IT can use to determine whether or not its infrastructure is prepared for a migration to a new operating system, server version or cloud-based deployment.
  • MIMO (multiple input, multiple output) - MIMO (multiple input, multiple output) is an antenna technology for wireless communications in which multiple antennas are used at both the source (transmitter) and the destination (receiver).
  • MISO (multiple input, single output) - MISO (multiple input, single output) is an antenna technology for wireless communications in which multiple antennas are used at the source (transmitter).
  • Molex - In business since 1938, Molex manufactures electronic, electrical, and optical fiber connectors.
  • MOSPF (Multicast Open Shortest Path First) - MOSPF (Multicast Open Shortest Path First) is an extension to the OSPF (Open Shortest Path First) protocol that facilitates interoperation between unicast and multicast routers.
  • mu-Law - Mu-Law is the standard codec (compression/decompression) algorithm for pulse code modulation (PCM) from the CCITT (Consultative Committee for International Telephone and Telegraph).
  • multi-carrier modulation (MCM) - Multi-carrier modulation (MCM) is a method of transmitting data by splitting it into several components, and sending each of these components over separate carrier signals.
  • multi-tapping - Multi-tapping is an older procedure used to enter text using a telephone keypad.
  • multimode fiber - In optical fiber technology, multimode fiber is optical fiber that is designed to carry multiple light rays or modes concurrently, each at a slightly different reflection angle within the optical fiber core.
  • Nagle's algorithm - Named for its creator, John Nagle, the Nagle algorithm is used to automatically concatenate a number of small buffer messages; this process (called nagling) increases the efficiency of a network application system by decreasing the number of packets that must be sent.
  • NAK (negative acknowledgment or not acknowledged) - NAK is an abbreviation for negative acknowledgment or not acknowledged.
  • narrowband - Generally, narrowband describes telecommunication that carries voice information in a narrow band of frequencies.
  • National eGovernance Service Delivery Gateway (NSDG) - National eGovernance Service Delivery Gateway (NSDG) is a mission mode project (MMP) under the National e-Governance Plan (NeGP) that acts as a central repository for government data.
  • National Electronic Disease Surveillance System (NEDSS) - The National Electronic Disease Surveillance System (NEDSS) is a secure online framework that allows healthcare professionals and government agencies to communicate about disease patterns and coordinate national response to outbreaks.
  • NBAR (Network Based Application Recognition) - Network Based Application Recognition (NBAR) is a mechanism that classifies and regulates bandwidth for network applications to ensure that available resources are utilized as efficiently as possible.
  • network coding - Network coding is a method of optimizing the flow of digital data in a network by transmitting digital evidence about messages.
  • network operations center (NOC) - A network operations center (NOC) is a place from which administrators supervise, monitor and maintain a telecommunications network.
  • network protocols - Network protocols are sets of established rules that dictate how to format, transmit and receive data so computer network devices -- from servers and routers to endpoints -- can communicate regardless of the differences in their underlying infrastructures, designs or standards.
  • network switch - A network switch is a hardware device that channels incoming data from multiple input ports to a specific output port that will take it toward its intended destination.
  • network terminator 1 (NT1) - Using the Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) Basic Rate Interchange (Basic Rate Interface in ISDN) service, an NT1 (network terminating unit is a device that accepts a two-wire signal from the phone company and converts it to a four-wire signal that sends and receives to and from devices within the home or business.
  • network traffic - Network traffic, sometimes referred to as data traffic, is the amount of data which moves across a network during any given time.
  • Nyquist Theorem - The Nyquist Theorem, also known as the sampling theorem, is a principle that engineers follow in the digitization of analog signals.
  • OFDMA (orthogonal frequency-division multiple access) - Orthogonal frequency-division multiple access (OFDMA) is a feature of Wi-Fi 6 (802.
  • optical line terminal (OLT) - An optical line terminal (OLT) is a device that is located at the service provider's central office and is the endpoint of a passive optical network (PON).
  • orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) - Orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) is a digital modulation method that splits a signal into several narrowband channels carried on different frequencies to reduce interference.
  • P4P (proactive provider participation for P2P) - P4P (proactive provider participation for P2P) is a protocol designed to improve the use of available bandwidth in a P2P network by reducing the overall volume of traffic.
  • packet coalescing - In network adapters using Network Driver Interface Specification (NDIS) versions 6.
  • packet loss - Packet loss is the failure of one or more transmitted packets to arrive at their destination.
  • packet loss concealment (PLC) - Packet loss concealment (PLC) is a technology designed to minimize the practical effect of lost packets in digital communications.
  • Packet-Level Procedure (PAP) - PAP (Packet-Level Procedure) is a full-duplex protocol for transferring packets between parties in an X.
  • payload (computing) - In computing, a payload is the carrying capacity of a packet or other transmission data unit.
  • perigee - When a satellite follows a non-circular orbit around the earth, the satellite's path is an ellipse with the center of the earth at one focus.
  • Peripheral Component Interconnect Express (PCIe, PCI-E) - PCIe is a high-speed serial interconnection standard for connecting peripheral devices to a computer's motherboard.
  • persistent connection (HTTP persistent connection) - A persistent connection (HTTP persistent connection) is a network communication channel that remains open for further HTTP requests and responses rather than closing after a single exchange.
  • personal video recorder (PVR) - A personal video recorder (PVR) is an interactive TV recording device, in essence a sophisticated set-top box with recording capability (although it is not necessarily kept on top of the television set).
  • phased antenna system - .
  • PIO (Programmed Input/Output) - Programmed Input/Output (PIO) is a way of moving data between devices in a computer in which all data must pass through the processor.
  • Powercast - Powercast is a technology that uses a low-level radio frequency (RF) electromagnetic field to recharge small electrochemical cells and batteries.

-ADS BY GOOGLE

SearchCompliance

  • risk management

    Risk management is the process of identifying, assessing and controlling threats to an organization's capital and earnings.

  • compliance as a service (CaaS)

    Compliance as a Service (CaaS) is a cloud service service level agreement (SLA) that specified how a managed service provider (...

  • data protection impact assessment (DPIA)

    A data protection impact assessment (DPIA) is a process designed to help organizations determine how data processing systems, ...

SearchSecurity

  • spyware

    Spyware is a type of malicious software -- or malware -- that is installed on a computing device without the end user's knowledge.

  • application whitelisting

    Application whitelisting is the practice of specifying an index of approved software applications or executable files that are ...

  • botnet

    A botnet is a collection of internet-connected devices, which may include PCs, servers, mobile devices and internet of things ...

SearchHealthIT

SearchDisasterRecovery

  • business continuity plan (BCP)

    A business continuity plan (BCP) is a document that consists of the critical information an organization needs to continue ...

  • disaster recovery team

    A disaster recovery team is a group of individuals focused on planning, implementing, maintaining, auditing and testing an ...

  • cloud insurance

    Cloud insurance is any type of financial or data protection obtained by a cloud service provider. 

SearchStorage

  • DRAM (dynamic random access memory)

    Dynamic random access memory (DRAM) is a type of semiconductor memory that is typically used for the data or program code needed ...

  • RAID 10 (RAID 1+0)

    RAID 10, also known as RAID 1+0, is a RAID configuration that combines disk mirroring and disk striping to protect data.

  • PCIe SSD (PCIe solid-state drive)

    A PCIe SSD (PCIe solid-state drive) is a high-speed expansion card that attaches a computer to its peripherals.

Close