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Electronics

Terms related to electronics, including definitions about electrical components and words and phrases about computers, laptops parts, digital cameras, televisions and home appliances.

COO - FOU

  • cook-off test - A cook-off test is a controlled experiment conducted to determine if or how soon a component, device or system will malfunction because of internally generated heat.
  • coprocessor - A coprocessor is a special set of circuits in a microprocessor chip that is designed to manipulate numbers or perform some other specialized function more quickly than the basic microprocessor circuits could perform the same task.
  • cosine wave - A cosine wave is a signal waveform with a shape identical to that of a sine wave, except each point on the cosine wave occurs exactly 1/4 cycle earlier than the corresponding point on the sine wave.
  • coulomb - The coulomb (symbolized C) is the standard unit of electric charge in the International System of Units (SI).
  • coulomb per centimeter squared - The coulomb per centimeter squared (symbolized C/cm 2) is a unit of electric flux density.
  • coulomb per meter cubed - The coulomb per meter cubed is the unit of electric charge density.
  • cow power (biogas) - Cow power is a term for the conversion of manure to usable energy.
  • CPE device - A CPE device is telecommunications hardware located at the home or business of a customer.
  • CrackBerry - CrackBerry is a nickname for the BlackBerry handheld device.
  • crossbar latch - A crossbar latch, also called a molecular crossbar latch, is a nanoscale device with properties similar to those of a conventional silicon transistor, but physically much smaller, having a diameter of approximately 2 nanometers (nm, where 1 nm = 10-9 m).
  • crosstalk - Crosstalk is a disturbance caused by the electric or magnetic fields of one telecommunication signal affecting a signal in an adjacent circuit.
  • current - Current is a flow of electrical charge carriers, usually electrons or electron-deficient atoms.
  • cycles per second (CPS) - Cps (cycles per second) is the measure of how frequently an alternating current changes direction.
  • Daylight Saving Time patch - A Daylight Saving Time patch is a modular piece of code created to update systems, devices and programs for compatibility with new start and end dates for Daylight Saving Time (DST) in the United States, Canada and Bermuda.
  • DC (direct current) - DC (direct current) is the unidirectional flow or movement of electric charge carriers (which are usually electrons).
  • debouncing - Bouncing is the tendency of any two metal contacts in an electronic device to generate multiple signals as the contacts close or open; debouncing is any kind of hardware device or software that ensures that only a single signal will be acted upon for a single opening or closing of a contact.
  • decibel - In electronics and communications, the decibel (abbreviated as dB, and also as db and DB) is a logarithmic expression of the ratio between two signal power, voltage, or current levels.
  • decibels related to dipole antenna (dBd) - dBd (decibels related to dipole antenna) is a measure of the gain of an antenna system relative to a dipole antenna at radio frequency.
  • decibels relative to one milliwatt (dBm) - The expression dBm is used to define signal strength in wires and cables at RF and AF frequencies.
  • degauss - To degauss is to demagnetize.
  • delivery drone - A delivery drone is a type of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) used for distributing packages to consumers through advanced AI technology.
  • demand-based switching (DBS) - Demand-based switching (DBS) is a power-management technology developed by Intel in which the applied voltage and clock speed for a microprocessor are kept to the minimum necessary to allow optimum performance of required operations.
  • dendrimer - A dendrimer (from Greek dendra for tree) is an artificially manufactured or synthesized molecule built up from branched units called monomers.
  • dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM) - Dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM) is a technology that puts together -- multiplexes -- data signals from different sources so they can share a single optical fiber pair while maintaining complete separation of the data streams.
  • dielectric constant - The dielectric constant is the ratio of the permittivity of a substance to the permittivity of free space.
  • dielectric material - A dielectric material is a substance that is a poor conductor of electricity, but an efficient supporter of electrostatic fields.
  • digital - Digital describes electronic technology that generates, stores, and processes data in terms of two states: positive and non-positive.
  • digital audio broadcasting (DAB) - .
  • digital signal processing (DSP) - Digital signal processing (DSP) refers to various techniques for improving the accuracy and reliability of digital communications.
  • digital signal X - Digital signal X is a term for the series of standard digital transmission rates or levels based on DS0, a transmission rate of 64 kilobits per second (Kbps), the bandwidth normally used for one telephone voice channel.
  • digital wallet - A digital wallet is a software application that serves as an electronic version of a physical wallet, digitizing credit and debit card information to enable consumers to make purchases from their smartphones.
  • digital-to-analog conversion (DAC) - Digital-to-analog conversion is a process in which signals having a few (usually two) defined levels or states (digital) are converted into signals having a theoretically infinite number of states (analog).
  • diode - A diode is a specialized electronic component with two electrodes called the anode and the cathode.
  • dipole antenna - A dipole antenna is a straight electrical conductor measuring 1/2 wavelength from end to end and connected at the center to a radio-frequency (RF) feed line.
  • direct sequence spread spectrum (DSSS) or direct sequence code division multiple access (DS-CDMA) - Direct sequence spread spectrum, also known as direct sequence code division multiple access (DS-CDMA), is one of two approaches to spread spectrum modulation for digital signal transmission over the airwaves.
  • directional antenna - A directional antenna is a radio-frequency (RF) wireless antenna designed to function more effectively in some directions than in others.
  • dish antenna - A dish antenna, also known simply as a dish, is common in microwave systems.
  • DisplayPort - DisplayPort is an interface for digital displays, particularly computer monitors.
  • disposable computer - A disposable computer is a small data processing device with input/output, memory, and communication capabilities; the device is intended to be used for a limited time period or number of uses and then discarded.
  • Dolby Digital - Dolby Digital, formerly known as AC-3, is a digital audio coding technique that reduces the amount of data needed to produce high quality sound.
  • Doppler effect - The frequency and wavelength of an electromagnetic field are affected by relative motion.
  • doubler - A doubler is an electronic device that doubles the frequency of an input signal.
  • dual Wi-Fi antenna - A dual Wi-Fi antenna is a pair of identical antennas on a wireless router or Wi-Fi-equipped device, intended to eliminate signal fading and dead spots.
  • dual-carbon battery - Dual-carbon batteries are a new energy storage technology that uses a form of carbon for both the anode and the cathode.
  • dynamic range - Dynamic range describes the ratio of the softest sound to the loudest sound in a musical instrument or piece of electronic equipment.
  • e-bomb (electromagnetic bomb) - An e-bomb (electromagnetic bomb) is a weapon that uses an intense electromagnetic field to create a brief pulse of energy that affects electronic circuitry without harming humans or buildings.
  • e-cycling - E-cycling is the practice of reusing, or distributing for reuse, electronic equipment and components rather than discarding them at the end of their life cycle.
  • e-waste - E-waste is any refuse created by discarded electronic devices and components as well as substances involved in their manufacture or use.
  • electret microphone - An electret microphone is a widely-used electronic communications and audio recording device.
  • electric arc - An electric arc is a visible plasma discharge between two electrodes that is caused by electrical current ionizing gasses in the air.
  • electric field strength - Electric field strength is a quantitative expression of the intensity of an electric field at a particular location.
  • electric fire extinguisher - An electric fire extinguisher is thin wire that generates electric fields that, when directed towards smoky flames, can put out fires.
  • electric grid - An electric grid is a network of synchronized power providers and consumers that are connected by transmission and distribution lines and operated by one or more control centers.
  • electric vehicle charging station - An electric vehicle charging station is equipment that connects an EV to a source of electricity to recharge electric cars, neighborhood electric vehicles and plug-in hybrids.
  • electrical pollution (dirty electricity) - Electrical pollution is electromagnetic-field (or EM-field) energy emanating from electrical wiring.
  • Electricity over IP (EoIP) - EoIP is a proposed scheme for delivering electric power via IP (Internet protocol).
  • electrochemical cell - An electrochemical cell is a device that is essentially a contained chemical reaction that produces an electrical current.
  • electrochromic - Electrochromic is an adjective used to describe an organic or inorganic substance that changes color when charged with electricity.
  • electroluminescence - Electroluminescence is a characteristic of a material, typically a semiconductor, that enables it to emit light in response to an electrical current or a strong electrical field.
  • electromagnetic field - An electromagnetic field, sometimes referred to as an EM field, is generated when charged particles, such as electrons, are accelerated.
  • electromagnetic induction - Electromagnetic induction is the creation of an electro-motive force by way of a moving magnetic field around an electric conductor and, conversely, the creation of current by moving an electric conductor through a static magnetic field.
  • electromagnetic interference (EMI) - EMI (electromagnetic interference) is the disruption of operation of an electronic device when it is in the vicinity of an electromagnetic field (EM field) in the radio frequency (RF) spectrum that is caused by another electronic device.
  • electromagnetic radiation spectrum - The electromagnetic radiation spectrum is the complete range of the wavelengths of electromagnetic radiation, beginning with the longest radio waves (including those in the audio range) and extending through visible light (a very small part of the spectrum) all the way to the extremely short gamma rays that are a product of radioactive atoms.
  • electron - An electron is a negatively charged subatomic particle.
  • electron rest mass - The electron rest mass, symbolized m e, is the mass of an electron as measured when its speed is zero relative to an observer.
  • electronic logging device (ELD) - An electronic logging device (ELD) is electronic hardware used to record the working hours of a commercially-operated motor vehicle.
  • electronic nose (e-nose) - An electronic nose (e-nose) is a device that identifies the specific components of an odor and analyzes its chemical makeup to identify it.
  • electronic paper display (EPD) - An electronic paper display (EPD) is an electrically-charged surface that replicates the look and experience of ink on paper.
  • electrostatic discharge (ESD) - Electrostatic discharge (ESD) is the release of static electricity when two objects come into contact.
  • electrostatic field - When two objects in each other's vicinity have different electrical charges, an electrostatic field exists between them.
  • elementary charge - An elementary charge is the electrical charge carried by a single electron.
  • EM shielding (electromagnetic shielding) - EM shielding (electromagnetic shielding) is the practice of surrounding electronics and cables with conductive or magnetic materials to guard against incoming or outgoing emissions of electromagnetic frequencies (EMF).
  • embedded device - An embedded device is an object that contains a special-purpose computing system.
  • embedded vision - Embedded vision is the integration of computer vision in machines that use algorithms to decode meaning from observing pixel patterns in images or video.
  • energy - Energy is the capacity of a physical system to do work.
  • Energy Star - Energy Star is a government-backed labeling program that helps people and organizations save money and reduce greenhouse gas emissions by identifying factories, office equipment, home appliances and electronics that have superior energy efficiency.
  • entangled light-emitting diode (ELED) - An entangled LED is a light-emitting diode containing a quantum dot that enables the production of entangled photons (light particles) on demand.
  • entanglement - Entanglement is a term used in quantum theory to describe the way that particles of energy/matter can become correlated to predictably interact with each other regardless of how far apart they are.
  • fan-in - Fan-in is a term that defines the maximum number of digital inputs that a single logic gate can accept.
  • fan-out - Fan-out is a term that defines the maximum number of digital inputs that the output of a single logic gate can feed.
  • farad (F) - The farad is the standard international unit of capacitance.
  • Faraday constant - Faraday's constant, symbolized by the italic uppercase letter F, is the physical constant representing the electric charge in a mole.
  • FC-PGA (flip chip-pin grid array) - FC-PGA (flip chip-pin grid array) is a microchip design developed by Intel for its faster microprocessors in which the hottest part of the chip is located on the side that is away from the motherboard.
  • FeliCa - .
  • femtocell - A femtocell is a wireless access point that improves cellular reception inside a home or office building.
  • fiber jumper - A fiber jumper, sometimes called a fiber patch cord is a length of fiber cabling fitted with LC, SC, MTRJ or ST connectors at each end.
  • fiber optic - Fiber optic (or "optical fiber") refers to the medium and the technology associated with the transmission of information as light impulses along a glass or plastic wire or fiber.
  • fiber optics (optical fiber) - Fiber optics, or optical fiber, refers to the medium and the technology associated with the transmission of information as light pulses along a glass or plastic strand or fiber.
  • field emission display (FED) - A field emission display (FED) is a new type of flat-panel display in which electron emitters, arranged in a grid, are individually controlled by "cold" cathodes to generate colored light.
  • field-effect transistor (FET) - A field-effect transistor (FET) is a type of transistor commonly used for weak-signal amplification (for example, for amplifying wireless signals).
  • field-replaceable unit (FRU) - In electronic hardware, particularly computer systems, a field-replaceable unit (FRU) is a circuit board or part that can be quickly and easily removed and replaced by the user or by a technician without having to send the entire product or system to a repair facility.
  • first law of thermodynamics - Energy is neither created nor destroyed.
  • flash storage - Flash storage is any type of drive, repository or system that uses flash memory to keep data for an extended period of time.
  • Flat-panel TV Glossary - A glossary with terms related to flat-panel TVs.
  • Flat-panel TV Guide - Benefits of flat-panel TVs | Flat-panel features to considerA quick comparison of LCD, LED, OLED and plasma TVsFlat-panel TV technologies: LCD | LED | Plasma | OLEDMore informationA flat-panel TV is a television set that uses one of several different technologies for display in a flat, thin format.
  • flexible transistor - A flexible transistor is one which, unlike present, rigidly-structured transistor s, can be successfully used in packages that can be curled up, wrapped, or bent, a quality that will enable users to - for example - have a display screen that can be rolled up.
  • floating gate transistor (FGT) - A floating gate transistor (FGT) is a complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology capable of holding an electrical charge in a memory device that is used to store data.
  • Fourier series - A Fourier (pronounced foor-YAY) series is a specific type of infinite mathematical series involving trigonometric functions.
  • Fourier synthesis - Fourier synthesis is a method of electronically constructing a signal with a specific, desired periodic waveform.

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