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Electronics

Terms related to electronics, including definitions about electrical components and words and phrases about computers, laptops parts, digital cameras, televisions and home appliances.

SOF - YAG

  • softcooling (software cooling) - Softcooling is a software-based method of computer component cooling, conducted either by adjusting component settings or by using softcooling products.
  • solar cooling - Solar cooling is a system that converts heat from the sun into cooling that can be used for refrigeration and air conditioning.
  • solar panel - A solar panel is a flat construction resembling a window, built with technology that allows it to passively harvest the heat of the sun or create electricity from its energy through photovoltaics.
  • solar power - Solar power is the use of the sun’s energy either thermally or through the use of photovoltaic cells in solar panels and transparent photovoltaic glass to generate electricity.
  • solenoid - A solenoid is a coil of insulated or enameled wire wound on a rod-shaped form made of solid iron, solid steel, or powdered iron.
  • solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) - A solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is a fuel cell that derives its energy directly from the oxidation of a solid or ceramic material called an electrolyte.
  • solid-state - Solid-state refers to electronic components, devices, and systems based entirely on the semiconductor.
  • solid-state storage - Solid-state storage (SSS) is a type of computer storage media made from silicon microchips.
  • soliton - A soliton is a special form of light pulse that can be transmitted over a fiber optic channel.
  • sonar (sound navigation and ranging) - Sonar is an acronym (like radar, now spelled with all lower-case letters) for sound navigation and ranging.
  • space - In mathematics, space is an unbounded continuum (unbroken set of points) in which exactly three numerical coordinates are necessary to uniquely define the location of any particular point.
  • speed of light - The speed of light in free space (that is, in a vacuum) is a constant that has been measured to considerable accuracy.
  • spintronics - Spintronics is an emerging field of nanoscale electronics involving the detection and manipulation of electron spin.
  • standby power - Standby power is electrical power that a device consumes when not in present use, but plugged in to a source of power and ready to be used.
  • standing-wave ratio (SWR, VWSR, IWSR) - Standing-wave ratio (SWR) is a mathematical expression of the non-uniformity of an electromagnetic field (EM field) on a transmission line such as coaxial cable.
  • statohm (stat W) - The statohm (symbolized stat W) is the unit of resistance in the cgs (centimeter/gram/second) electrostatic system of units.
  • statsiemens (statS) - The statsiemens (symbolized statS) is the unit of conductance in the cgs (centimeter/gram/second) electrostatic system of units.
  • statvolt (statV) - The statvolt (symbolized statV) is the unit of electromotive force (EMF) or potential difference in the cgs (centimeter/gram/second) electrostatic system.
  • statwatt (statW) - The statwatt (symbolized statW) is the unit of power in the cgs (centimeter/gram/second) electrostatic system.
  • stepless frequency control (SFS) - Stepless frequency selection (SFS) is a technology that makes it possible to adjust the system bus frequency of a computer in increments of 1 MHz over a specified range.
  • stepper - A stepper is a machine used to project the image of a circuit in photolithographic semiconductor fabrication.
  • stereoscopy (stereoscopic imaging) - Stereoscopy, sometimes called stereoscopic imaging, is a technique used to enable a three-dimensional effect, adding an illusion of depth to a flat image.
  • strange matter - Strange matter is matter consisting of atoms whose nuclei contain pairs of particles called strange quark s.
  • superconducting quantum interference device - A superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) is a mechanism used to measure extremely weak signals, such as subtle changes in the human body's electromagnetic energy field.
  • superconductivity - Superconductivity is the ability of certain materials to conduct electric current with practically zero resistance.
  • switch-on-a-chip (SOC) - A switch-on-a-chip (SOC) is a network - typically a storage network - switch (a device that channels incoming data flow from any of multiple input ports to the output port appropriate for its destination) that is built into a single microchip (integrated circuit).
  • telechir - A telechir is a complex robot that is remotely controlled by a human operator in a telepresence system, which gives a person the sense of being on location in a remote, dangerous, or alien environment.
  • telecom carrier - A telecom carrier is a company that is authorized by regulatory agencies to operate a telecommunications system.
  • teleoperation (telerobotics) - Teleoperation, also called telerobotics, is the technical term for the remote control of a robot called a telechir.
  • teleportation - Teleportation is the duplication or re-creation of physical objects or their properties using light beams, according to researchers at the California Institute of Technology.
  • telepresence room - A telepresence room is a conference space dedicated to high-end videoconferencing.
  • Tempest - Tempest was the name of a classified (secret) U.
  • terahertz (THz) - The terahertz, abbreviated THz, is a unit of electromagnetic (EM) wave frequency equal to one trillion hertz (1012 Hz).
  • Tesla Powerpack - Tesla Powerpack and Powerwall are, respectively, the company’s business and residential market rechargeable battery products, designed for large-scale energy storage for off-grid and supplemental power systems.
  • Tesla Powerwall - Powerwall, which is aimed at the residential market, is designed to store power generated by solar panels or wind turbines at peak time for use during power outages and out-of-peak time, including night.
  • thermal grease (thermal paste or thermal compound) - Thermal grease, also called thermal paste or thermal compound, is a substance used to promote better heat conduction between two surfaces and is commonly used between a microprocessor and a heatsink.
  • thermal imaging - Thermal imaging is a method of improving visibility of objects in a dark environment by detecting the objects' infrared radiation and creating an image based on that information.
  • thermoelectric cooling - Thermoelectric cooling is a way to remove thermal energy from a medium, device or component by applying a voltage of constant polarity to a junction between dissimilar electrical conductors or semiconductors.
  • thin-film transistor (TFT) - A display screen made with TFT (thin-film transistor) technology is a liquid crystal display (LCD), common in notebook and laptop computers, that has a transistor for each pixel (that is, for each of the tiny elements that control the illumination of your display).
  • thyristor - A thyristor is a four-layer semiconductor device, consisting of alternating P type and N type materials (PNPN).
  • tin whiskers - Tin whiskers are individual crystals of tin that grow spontaneously from a tinned surface, usually as a result of stress of some sort.
  • toroid - A toroid is a coil of insulated or enameled wire wound on a donut-shaped form made of powdered iron.
  • torque - Torque is a twisting or turning force that tends to cause rotation around an axis; it can also be thought of as the ability of something that is rotating, such as a gear or a shaft, to overcome turning resistance.
  • touch screen - A touch screen is a computer display screen that is also an input device.
  • tracking array - A tracking array is a collection of solar panels that turn to follow the path of the sun in order to maximize the solar radiation on the photovoltaic (PV) surface and convert light into electrical current.
  • transconductance - Transconductance is an expression of the performance of a bipolar transistoror field-effect transistor (FET).
  • transducer - A transducer is an electronic device that converts energy from one form to another.
  • transistor - The transistor, invented by three scientists at the Bell Laboratories in 1947, rapidly replaced the vacuum tube as an electronic signal regulator.
  • transistor-to-transistor logic (TTL) - Transistor-transistor logic (TTL) is a digital logic design in which bipolar transistors act on direct-current pulses.
  • transparent semiconductor - A transparent semiconductor is a substance that can be used to manufacture see-through electronic components and circuits.
  • transponder - A transponder is a wireless communications, monitoring, or control device that picks up and automatically responds to an incoming signal.
  • traveling-wave tube (TWT) - A traveling-wave tube (TWT) is a specialized vacuum tube used in wireless communications, especially in satellite systems.
  • trip unit (circuit breaker) - A trip unit is the part of a circuit breaker that opens the circuit in the event of a thermal overload, short circuit or ground fault.
  • tru2way - Tru2way is the trade name for a technology that facilitates interactive TV and the convergence of digital television (DTV) with other communications devices.
  • twisted nematic display (TN display) - A twisted nematic (TN) display is a common type of liquid-crystal display (LCD) that consists of a substance called a nematic liquid crystal that is confined between two plates of polarized glass.
  • UHF (ultrahigh frequency) - The UHF (ultrahigh frequency) range of the radio spectrum is the band extending from 300 MHz to 3 GHz.
  • ultra-mobile personal computer (UMPC or Ultra-mobile PC) - Ultra-mobile PC (UMPC) is a design specification for a hand-held computer that is larger than a PDA but smaller than a laptop.
  • ultracapacitor - An ultracapacitor, also called a supercapacitor, is an electrical component capable of holding hundreds of times more electrical charge quantity than a standard capacitor.
  • ultrasound - Ultrasound is acoustic (sound) energy in the form of waves having a frequency above the human hearing range.
  • Universal Powerline Bus (UPB) - Universal Powerline Bus (UPB) is a communication methodology for home automation device control, allowing devices to communicate with pulse-position modulation through power lines.
  • vacuum tube (VT, electron tube or valve) - Also see cathode ray tube (CRT), the specialized kind of vacuum tube that is in most desktop display monitors.
  • valve - A valve is a mechanism that opens and closes to control the flow of fluids.
  • vampire tap - A vampire tap is a connection to a coaxial cable in which a hole is drilled through the outer shield of the cable so that a clamp can be connected to the inner conductor of the cable.
  • vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) - A vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) is a specialized laser diode that promises to revolutionize fiber optic communications by improving efficiency and increasing data speed.
  • Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) - VLSI (very large-scale integration) is the current level of computer microchip miniaturization and refers to microchips containing in the hundreds of thousands of transistor s.
  • vestigial sideband (VSB) - Vestigial sideband (VSB) is a type of amplitude modulation (AM) technique (sometimes called VSB-AM) that encodes data by varying the amplitude of a single carrier frequency.
  • VHF (very high frequency) - The VHF (very high frequency) range of the radio spectrum is the band extending from 30 MHz to 300 MHz.
  • VHS (Video Home System) - VHS (Video Home System) is a widely-adopted videocassette recording (VCR) technology that was developed by Japan Victor Company (JVC) and put on the market in 1976.
  • virtual assistant (AI assistant) - A digital assistant is an application program that can understand natural human language and complete electronic tasks for the end user.
  • virtual power plant - A virtual power plant is the combination of numerous solar-powered, battery-backed homes delivering excess power back into the grid to provide power for other locations.
  • virus-assembled battery - A virus-assembled battery is a self-contained, high-density electrical energy source created by a process in which biological viruses assemble inorganic molecules into predetermined structures.
  • volt - The volt (symbolized V) is the Standard International (SI) unit of electric potential or electromotive force.
  • voltage - Voltage, also called electromotive force, is a quantitative expression of the potential difference in charge between two points in an electrical field.
  • voltage reference - A voltage reference is an electronic component or circuit that produces a constant DC (direct-current) output voltage regardless of variations in external conditions such as temperature, barometric pressure, humidity, current demand, or the passage of time.
  • voltmeter - A voltmeter, also known as a voltage meter, is an instrument used for measuring the potential difference, or voltage, between two points in an electrical or electronic circuit.
  • waste heat recovery - Waste heat recovery is the collection of heat created as an undesired by-product of the operation of a piece of equipment or machinery to fill a desired purpose elsewhere.
  • water cooling - In computers, water cooling is a method used to lower the temperatures of computer processors, and sometimes other components such as graphics cards, using water rather than air as the cooling medium.
  • watt - The watt (abbreviated W) is the International System of Units' (SI) standard unit of power (energy per unit time), the equivalent of one jouleper second.
  • watt per steradian - The watt per steradian (W · sr -1) is the standard unit of radiant intensity.
  • watt-hour (Wh) - The watt-hour (symbolized Wh) is a unit of energy equivalent to one watt (1 W) of power expended for one hour (1 h) of time.
  • wave number - The term wave number refers to the number of complete wave cycles of an electromagnetic field (EM field) that exist in one meter (1 m) of linear space.
  • waveform - A waveform is a representation of how alternating current (AC) varies with time.
  • waveguide - A waveguide is an electromagnetic feed line used in microwave communications, broadcasting, and radar installations.
  • wavelength - A wavelength is a measure of distance between two identical peaks or crests -- high points -- or between two identical troughs -- low points -- in a wave.
  • wavelet - A wavelet is a mathematical function useful in digital signal processing and image compression.
  • WEEE Directive (Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment Directive) - The Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) Directive is legislation that, in conjujction with RoHS, mandates targets for the collection, recovery and recycling of electronics and component materials.
  • whip antenna - A whip antenna is a single-element antenna that can be used with anunbalanced feed line such as coaxial cable,or attached directly to a wirelesstransmitter, receiver, or transceiver.
  • white noise - White noise is a sound that contains every frequency within the range of human hearing (generally from 20 hertz to 20 kHz) in equal amounts.
  • white space device (WSD) - A white space device is an FCC-certified wireless device that can be used without an exclusive broadcast license in the RF spectrum below 700 MHz: underutilized, unlicensed portions of the spectrum called white space.
  • wind farm - A wind farm or wind park is a grouping of wind turbines in an area.
  • wind power - Wind power is the kinetic energy of wind, harnessed and redirected to perform a task mechanically or to generate electrical power.
  • wind turbine - A wind turbine is a power generating device that is driven by the kinetic energy of the wind.
  • wire speed - Wire speed refers to the rate of data transfer a given telecommunication technology provides at the physical wire level.
  • wireless charging - Wireless charging is any of several methods of charging batteries without the use of cables.
  • wireless energy transfer - Wireless energy transfer is a method of getting useful electricity from one place to another without the need for electrical conducting media.
  • Wirth's Law - Wirth's Law states that computer software increases in complexity faster than does the ability of available hardware to run it.
  • X10 protocol - The X10 protocol is a communication methodology for home automation device control.
  • x86-64 - x86-64 is a 64-bit processing technology developed by AMD that debuted with the Opteron and Athlon 64 processor.
  • Yagi antenna (Yagi-Uda array) - A Yagi antenna, also known as a Yagi-Uda array or simply a Yagi, is a unidirectional antenna commonly used in communications when a frequency is above 10 MHz.

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