Browse Definitions :

Hardware

Terms related to computer hardware, including definitions about cables, connectors and power supply units and words and phrases about computing peripheral devices including the keyboard, mouse, audio speakers, and printers.

STA - WRA

  • stale data - In computer processing, if a processor changes the value of an operand and then, at a subsequent time, fetches the operand and obtains the old rather than the new value of the operand, then it is said to have seen stale data.
  • standalone dump - A standalone dump is the copying of the contents of computer main storage (random access memory) to another storage device, usually for the purpose of debugging a programming problem.
  • standardization - Standardization is the process of developing, promoting and possibly mandating standards-based and compatible technologies within a given industry.
  • standby power - Standby power is electrical power that a device consumes when not in present use, but plugged in to a source of power and ready to be used.
  • star network - A star network is a local area network (LAN) in which all nodes (workstations or other devices) are directly connected to a common central computer.
  • stepper motor - A stepper motor is a special type of electric motor that moves in increments, or steps, rather than turning smoothly as a conventional motor does.
  • stepping - Stepping is a number used by Intel to identify what level of design change a microprocessor was built to.
  • storage area management (SAM) - Storage area management (SAM) is a still-evolving set of procedures, services, and standards for comprehensively managing the infrastructure of a storage area network (SAN), including all components within all servers, the disk arrays, the tape libraries, the switches, the routers, and the programs.
  • storage area network (SAN) - A storage area network (SAN) is a dedicated high-speed network or subnetwork that interconnects and presents shared pools of storage devices to multiple servers.
  • storage distance extension - Storage distance extension refers to any of several different technologies that allow data communication in Fibre Channel storage area networks (SANs) over long spans of fiber optic cable.
  • storage medium (storage media) - In computers, a storage medium is any technology -- including devices and materials -- used to place, keep and retrieve electronic data.
  • storage virtualization - Storage virtualization is the pooling of physical storage from multiple storage devices into what appears to be a single storage device -- or pool of available storage capacity -- that is managed from a central console.
  • strange matter - Strange matter is matter consisting of atoms whose nuclei contain pairs of particles called strange quark s.
  • Stratoscale - Stratoscale is a cloud infrastructure vendor offering software-defined data center (SDDC) technology.
  • stress testing - Stress testing is the process of determining the ability of a computer, network, program or device to maintain a certain level of effectiveness under unfavorable conditions.
  • strobe - In computer or memory technology, a strobe is a signal that is sent that validates data or other signals on adjacent parallel lines.
  • superconducting quantum interference device - A superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) is a mechanism used to measure extremely weak signals, such as subtle changes in the human body's electromagnetic energy field.
  • Superdome - Superdome is a high-end 64-bit, Hewlett-Packard (HP) PA-8600 processor-based UNIX server designed for e-commerce customers using very large databases.
  • Supermicro - Supermicro is a company that specializes in x86-64 server technology.
  • Surface (Microsoft Surface tablet) - Surface is a line of tablet computers from Microsoft.
  • swap file (swap space or pagefile) - A swap file (or swap space or, in Windows NT, a pagefile) is a space on a hard disk used as the virtual memory extension of a computer's real memory (RAM).
  • switch-on-a-chip (SOC) - A switch-on-a-chip (SOC) is a network - typically a storage network - switch (a device that channels incoming data flow from any of multiple input ports to the output port appropriate for its destination) that is built into a single microchip (integrated circuit).
  • systems integrator - A systems integrator is an individual or business that builds computing systems for clients by combining hardware, software, networking and storage products from multiple vendors.
  • tape backup - Tape can help fix an unstructured data backup issue and is a good archiving medium.
  • tape drive - A tape drive is a device that stores computer data on magnetic tape, especially for backup and archiving purposes.
  • telechir - A telechir is a complex robot that is remotely controlled by a human operator in a telepresence system, which gives a person the sense of being on location in a remote, dangerous, or alien environment.
  • Tempest - Tempest was the name of a classified (secret) U.
  • terahertz (THz) - The terahertz, abbreviated THz, is a unit of electromagnetic (EM) wave frequency equal to one trillion hertz (1012 Hz).
  • texture sensing - Texture sensing is the ability of a robot end effector to determine whether a surface is smooth or rough.
  • the Open19 project - The Open19 project is aimed at standardizing servers, storage and networking components into a common set of form factors for any Electronic Industries Association (EIA) 19-inch data center rack.
  • thermal grease (thermal paste or thermal compound) - Thermal grease, also called thermal paste or thermal compound, is a substance used to promote better heat conduction between two surfaces and is commonly used between a microprocessor and a heatsink.
  • thermoelectric cooling - Thermoelectric cooling is a way to remove thermal energy from a medium, device or component by applying a voltage of constant polarity to a junction between dissimilar electrical conductors or semiconductors.
  • thin server - In the computer industry, a thin server is a PC that contains just enough hardware and software to support a particular function that users can share in a network, such as access to files on a storage device, access to CD-ROM drives, printing, or Internet access.
  • thin-film transistor (TFT) - A display screen made with TFT (thin-film transistor) technology is a liquid crystal display (LCD), common in notebook and laptop computers, that has a transistor for each pixel (that is, for each of the tiny elements that control the illumination of your display).
  • thyristor - A thyristor is a four-layer semiconductor device, consisting of alternating P type and N type materials (PNPN).
  • tidal power - Tidal energy is the generation of clean electricity by harnessing potential energy of the shifting water in ocean tides.
  • tiered storage - Tiered storage is a way to assign different categories of data to various types of storage media with the objective of reducing the total cost of storage.
  • TOLED (transparent organic light-emitting device) - TOLED (transparent organic light-emitting device) is a display technology being developed by the Universal Display Corporation (UDC) that uses transparent electrodes and light emitting materials in an organic light-emitting device (OLED).
  • Toslink - Toslink is a connector format for fiber optic digital audio cables.
  • touch screen - A touch screen is a computer display screen that is also an input device.
  • tower server - A tower server is a computer intended for use as a server and built in an upright cabinet that stands alone.
  • TrackPoint (pointing stick) - A TrackPoint, also called a pointing stick, is a cursor control device found in IBM ThinkPad notebook computers.
  • transistor-to-transistor logic (TTL) - Transistor-transistor logic (TTL) is a digital logic design in which bipolar transistors act on direct-current pulses.
  • transponder - A transponder is a wireless communications, monitoring, or control device that picks up and automatically responds to an incoming signal.
  • traveling-wave tube (TWT) - A traveling-wave tube (TWT) is a specialized vacuum tube used in wireless communications, especially in satellite systems.
  • Trusted Platform Module (TPM) - A Trusted Platform Module (TPM) is a specialized chip on an endpoint device that stores RSA encryption keys specific to the host system for hardware authentication.
  • turbine - A turbine is a machine that transforms rotational energy from a fluid that is picked up by a rotor system into usable work or energy.
  • turnkey - Turnkey is a product or service that is designed, supplied, built, or installed fully complete and ready to operate.
  • turnkey solution provider - A turnkey solution provider is a solution provider that offers limited consultation and one or more established product packages that allow only minimal configuration.
  • twisted nematic display (TN display) - A twisted nematic (TN) display is a common type of liquid-crystal display (LCD) that consists of a substance called a nematic liquid crystal that is confined between two plates of polarized glass.
  • two-spindle system (twin-spindle system) - A two-spindle system, also called a twin-spindle system, is a computer design with two internal storage drives.
  • UDO (ultra density optical) - Ultra density optical (UDO) is an optical storage technology that increases capacities by using an extremely focused blue laser to write and read data.
  • UHDV (ultra high definition video) - UHDV (ultra high definition video) is a technology that provides video image resolution containing 16 times as many pixels as HDTV (high definition television).
  • Ultra DMA (UDMA or Ultra DMA/33) - Ultra DMA (UDMA, or, more accurately, Ultra DMA/33) is a protocol for transferring data between a hard disk drive through the computer's data paths (or bus) to the computer's random access memory (RAM).
  • ultra-mobile personal computer (UMPC or Ultra-mobile PC) - Ultra-mobile PC (UMPC) is a design specification for a hand-held computer that is larger than a PDA but smaller than a laptop.
  • ultrasound - Ultrasound is acoustic (sound) energy in the form of waves having a frequency above the human hearing range.
  • Unified Extensible Firmware Interface (UEFI) - Unified Extensible Firmware Interface (UEFI) is a specification for a software program that connects a computer's firmware to its operating system (OS).
  • uninterruptible power supply (UPS) - An uninterruptible power supply (UPS) is a device that allows a computer to keep running for at least a short time when the primary power source is lost.
  • United Kingdom Climate Change Act - The United Kingdom Climate Change Act is the world's first legally binding environmental sustainability framework.
  • Universal Naming Convention (UNC) - In a network, the Universal Naming Convention (UNC) is a way to identify a shared file in a computer without having to specify (or know) the storage device it is on.
  • USB 3.0 (SuperSpeed USB) - USB 3.0, also known as SuperSpeed USB, is the next major revision of the Universal Serial Bus (USB).
  • USB flash drive - A USB flash drive -- also known as a stick, thumb or pen drive -- is a plug-and-play portable storage device that uses flash memory and can attach to a keychain.
  • VAX (Virtual Address eXtension) - VAX (Virtual Address eXtension) is an established line of mid-range server computers from the Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC).
  • Vblock (VCE Vblock) - Vblock is VCE’s hyper-converged infrastructure (HCI) product family.
  • VCD (video CD or video compact disc) - VCD (also called video CD, video compact disc or "disc") is a compact diskformat based on CD-ROM XAthat is specifically designed to hold MPEG-1video data and to include interactive capabilities.
  • VCR (videocassette recorder) - A VCR (videocassette recorder) is an electromechanical device for recording and playing back full-motion audio-visual programming on cassettes containing magnetic tape.
  • VDT (video display terminal, visual display terminal) - VDT (video display terminal, or sometimes visual display terminal) is a term used, especially in ergonomic studies, for the computer display.
  • vectored interrupt - In a computer, a vectored interrupt is an I/O interrupt that tells the part of the computer that handles I/O interrupts at the hardware level that a request for attention from an I/O device has been received and and also identifies the device that sent the request.
  • vendor-managed inventory (VMI) - Vendor-managed inventory (VMI) is an inventory management technique in which a supplier of goods, usually the manufacturer, is responsible for optimizing the inventory held by a distributor.
  • VeriChip - VeriChip is an injectable identification chip that can be inserted under the skin of a human being to provide biometric verification.
  • vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) - A vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) is a specialized laser diode that promises to revolutionize fiber optic communications by improving efficiency and increasing data speed.
  • vertical interval time code (VITC) - Vertical interval time code (abbreviated VITC and sometimes pronounced VIHT-see) is a timing signal that is part of a video recording.
  • vertical scalability (scaling up) - Vertical scalability is the ability to increase the capacity of existing hardware or software by adding resources - for example, adding processing power to a server to make it faster.
  • Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) - VLSI (very large-scale integration) is the current level of computer microchip miniaturization and refers to microchips containing in the hundreds of thousands of transistor s.
  • VHDCI (Very High Density Cable Interconnect) - Very High Density Cable Interconnect (VHDCI) is a compact 68-contact multipurpose connection type.
  • VHS (Video Home System) - VHS (Video Home System) is a widely-adopted videocassette recording (VCR) technology that was developed by Japan Victor Company (JVC) and put on the market in 1976.
  • virtual floppy disk - A virtual floppy disk is an alternative to the traditional floppy that exists as a file rather than a physical medium.
  • virtual keyboard - A virtual keyboard is a computer keyboard that a user operates by typing on or within a wireless- or optical-detectable surface or area rather than by depressing physical keys.
  • virtual memory - Virtual memory is a memory management capability of an operating system (OS) that uses hardware and software to allow a computer to compensate for physical memory shortages by temporarily transferring data from random access memory (RAM) to disk storage.
  • virtual tape - Virtual tape is an archival storage technology that makes it possible to save data as if it were being stored on tape although it may actually be stored on hard disk or on another storage medium.
  • VoIP phone - A VoIP phone is a hardware- or software-based telephone designed to use voice over IP (VoIP) technology to send and receive phone calls over an IP network.
  • VoIP trunk gateway - A VoIP trunk gateway is an interface that facilitates the use of plain old telephone service (POTS) equipment, such as conventional phone sets and fax machines, with a voice over IP (VoIP) network.
  • von Neumann bottleneck - The von Neumann bottleneck is a limitation on throughput caused by the standard personal computer architecture.
  • VRAM (video RAM) - VRAM (video RAM) is a reference to any type of random access memory (RAM) used to store image data for a computer display.
  • VSPEX BLUE - VSPEX™ BLUE is a hyper-converged appliance from EMC Corporation that includes compute, memory and storage resources in a single device.
  • WAN interface card (WIC) - A WAN interface card, or WIC, is a specialized network interface card (NIC) that allows devices to connect to a wide area network.
  • watchdog timer (WDT) - A watchdog timer (WDT) is a device or electronic card that performs a specific operation after a certain period of time if something goes wrong with an electronic system and the system does not recover on its own.
  • wearable robot - A wearable robot is a machine that facilitates telepresence, a sophisticated form of interactive remote control.
  • WEEE Directive (Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment Directive) - The Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) Directive is legislation that, in conjujction with RoHS, mandates targets for the collection, recovery and recycling of electronics and component materials.
  • white space device (WSD) - A white space device is an FCC-certified wireless device that can be used without an exclusive broadcast license in the RF spectrum below 700 MHz: underutilized, unlicensed portions of the spectrum called white space.
  • whiteboard - A whiteboard is a non-electronic variation of the traditional "rewriteable" schoolroom blackboard, but is white instead of black and of a material that can be written on with colored markers (known as dry erase markers).
  • Wiegand - Wiegand is the trade name for a technology used in card readers and sensors, particularly for access control applications.
  • wind turbine - A wind turbine is a power generating device that is driven by the kinetic energy of the wind.
  • Window RAM (WRAM) - Window RAM (WRAM), unrelated to Microsoft Windows, is very high-performance video RAM that is dual-ported and has about 25% more bandwidth than VRAM but costs less.
  • Windows Hardware Quality Labs (WHQL) - Windows Hardware Quality Labs (WHQL) is a Microsoft procedure for certifying that the hardware for peripherals and other components is compatible (works as expected) with Microsoft Windows operating systems.
  • Windows reboot loop - A reboot loop (or boot loop) occurs when a Windows device unexpectedly restarts at some point during its otherwise normal startup process.
  • WinFrame - WinFrame is a software product from Citrix that, together with a Windows NT operating system, allows a computer server to provide Windows applications and data for attached computer workstations.
  • wireless router - A wireless router is a device in a WLAN (wireless local area network) that determines the next network point to which a packet should be forwarded toward its destination.
  • Wirth's Law - Wirth's Law states that computer software increases in complexity faster than does the ability of available hardware to run it.
  • World Wide Name (WWN) - A World Wide Name (WWN) is a unique identifier that is assigned to a manufacturer by the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) and hard-coded into a Fibre Channel (FC) device.

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