Browse Definitions :

Internet acronyms and lingo

Terms related to Internet acronyms and lingo, including slang definitions and jargon about texting, Twitter and other social networking sites.

121 - CYB

  • 121 (one-to-one) - In Internet e-commerce, 121 is short for one-to-one, the philosophy that treating each customer as a special individual is a more successful approach than treating customers as a group of similar individuals.
  • 136 browser colors with names - Some Web page creators prefer to specify colors by name rather than by hexadecimal red-green-blue (RGB) intensity value.
  • 2001 - Midnight UTC on January 1, 2001 marked the beginning of the third millennium on the Western world's Gregorian calendar.
  • 216-color browser-safe palette - Go directly to the 216-color browser-safe palette table 136 browser colors with names When specifying colors for Web page backgrounds, fonts, and other elements for 256-color displays (the most common display capability), you will probably want to choose from the 216 colors that look the same on both PC and Mac operating systems.
  • 24x7 (24 hours a day, 7 days a week) - 24x7 means "24 hours a day, 7 days a week" and is used to describe a service, such as computer server monitoring, that is continuous, is always available (day or night), or involves products that can run constantly without disruption or downtime.
  • 404 (status code) - 404 is a frequently-seen status code that tells a Web user that a requested page is "Not found.
  • 404 error page - A 404 page is the webpage served to a user who tries to access a page that is unavailable.
  • AAAA resource record - An AAAA resource record is a record that stores a single IPv6 address.
  • above the fold - Above the fold, as it applies to Web design, is the portion of a Web page that is visible in a browser window when the page first loads.
  • acceptable use policy (AUP) - An acceptable use policy (AUP) is a policy that a user must agree to follow in order to be provided with access to a network or to the Internet.
  • Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) - Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) is a procedure for mapping a dynamic Internet Protocol address (IP address) to a permanent physical machine address in a local area network (LAN).
  • Adobe AIR - Adobe AIR is a developer's tool for creating platform-independent web applications that can be run on a user's desktop.
  • adware - Adware is any software application in which advertising banners are displayed while a program is running.
  • aggregate - In general, to aggregate (verb, from Latin aggregare meaning to add to) is to collect things together.
  • AI winter - AI winter is a quiet period for artificial intelligence research and development.
  • Alphanumerish - Alphanumerish is a term coined to define the shorthand typing language that has developed from computer users' habit of substituting numerals for letters and substituting both letters and numerals for words or word parts.
  • anonymous FTP (File Transfer Protocol) - Using the Internet's File Transfer Protocol (FTP), anonymous FTP is a method for giving users access to files so that they don't need to identify themselves to the server.
  • antidisintermediation - In commerce, antidisintermediation is a term used to describe the preservation of intermediary positions.
  • apps-on-tap (applications on tap) - Apps-on-tap (short for "applications on tap") is computer industry jargon for application programs or other services (Hewlett-Packard calls them e-services) that are available online for businesses or consumers.
  • arachnotaxis - Arachnotaxis is the use of a table or structured list of URLs for Web sites (or words that hyperlink to Web sites) in order to help locate them.
  • ASMR (autonomous sensory meridian response) - Autonomic sensory meridian response (ASMR) is a tingling sensation that some people experience when exposed to particular types of auditory or visual stimuli such as whispering, tapping and slow movements.
  • autofill - Autofill is a feature in software programs and applications that automatically inserts previously-entered information for the user’s convenience.
  • avatar - In a UNIX environment, an avatar is special user who is given the authority to access all file directories and files under the root directory.
  • B2C (Business2Consumer or Business-to-Consumer) - B2C is short for business-to-consumer, or the retailing part of e-commerce on the Internet.
  • B2E (Business2Employee or Business-to-Employee) - B2E is business-to-employee, an approach in which the focus of business is the employee, rather than the consumer (as it is in business-to-consumer, or B2C) or other businesses (as it is in business-to-business, or B2B).
  • backlink - In Hyper-G and possibly other hypertext systems, a backlink is a link back to the page or one of the pages that currently link to the page you're using.
  • bacn - Bacn (pronounced as "bacon") is Internet slang for email that a user wants to read, but not right away.
  • bad neighborhood - A bad neighborhood, in an SEO context, is a group of linked websites with poor reputations and search rankings.
  • banner - Depending on how it's used, a banner is either a graphic image that announces the name or identity of a site (and often is spread across the width of the Web page) or is an advertising image.
  • banner blindness - Banner blindness is the tendency of people to ignore banner ads on Web sites.
  • bell curve - A bell curve is a form of graph that is used to visualize the distribution of a set of chosen values across a specified group that tend to have a central, normal values, as peak with low and high extremes tapering off relatively symmetrically on either side.
  • Big Mother - Big Mother is the concept of pervasive parenting, in which parents use modern geolocation, wireless and video technologies to constantly track the activities of a child.
  • black box (black box testing) - Black box testing assesses a system solely from the outside, without the operator or tester knowing what is happening within the system to generate responses to test actions.
  • black hat - Black hat refers to a hacker who breaks into a computer system or network with malicious intent.
  • bloatware - Bloatware is an unflattering name for unwanted pre-installed software applications on a new computer.
  • blog (weblog) - A blog (short for weblog) is a personal online journal that is frequently updated and intended for general public consumption.
  • blogosphere - Blogosphere is a term some writers have used to describe the grassroots and interactive journalism made possible by participants in blogs (logs or journals maintained on the Internet) and the symbiotic relationship between bloggers and traditional journalists.
  • blogroll - A blogroll is a list of blogs, usually placed in the sidebar of a blog, that reads as a list of recommendations by the blogger of other blogs.
  • blogswarm - A blogswarm is a situation in which thousands of bloggers comment on the same story or news event.
  • Bluejacking - Bluejacking is the practice of sending messages between mobile users using a Bluetooth wireless connection.
  • bolt-on - On the Internet, bolt-on, perhaps inspired by add-on, is used to describe products and systems that can be quickly but securely attached to an existing Web site.
  • bounce email (bounce mail) - Bounce e-mail (sometimes referred to as bounce mail) is electronic mail that is returned to the sender because it cannot be delivered for some reason.
  • bounce rate - Bounce rate is the percentage of visitors to a given website that leave the site after viewing only a single page.
  • brain hacking - Brain hacking is the application of techniques and/or technologies to affect an individual’s mental state, cognitive processes or level of function.
  • breadcrumb trail - On a Web site, a breadcrumb trail is a navigation tool that allows a user to see where the current page is in relation to the Web site's hierarchy.
  • bricks and mortar - Bricks and mortar refers to businesses that have physical (rather than virtual or online) presences - in other words, stores (built of physical material such as bricks and mortar) that you can drive to and enter physically to see, touch, and purchase merchandise.
  • brochureware - Brochureware refers to Web sites or pages that are produced by taking an organization's printed brochure and translating it directly to the Web without regard for the possibilities of the new medium.
  • buddy icon (buddy avatar) - In AOL instant messaging, a buddy icon (sometimes called a buddy avatar) is a small image that a user can add to the lower left-hand corner of an instant message to represent the user or a buddy in their buddy list.
  • buddy list - In instant messaging (IM) applications on a personal computer (PC), or on a cellular telephone with text display, a buddy list is a list of people a user wants to keep track of.
  • Bump - Bump is a free software program (app) that allows two phones to transfer contact information when the phone owners "bump" hands.
  • Burning Man - Burning Man is an annual week-long experiment in temporary community.
  • CamelCase - CamelCase is a naming convention in which a name is formed of multiple words that are joined together as a single word with the first letter of each of the multiple words capitalized so that each word that makes up the name can easily be read.
  • cancelbot - A cancelbot is a program or bot (robot) that sends a message to one or more Usenet newsgroups to cancel (remove from posting) a certain type of message.
  • category - In blogging, a category is a software feature that allows a blogger to group posts together by topic.
  • catfish - A catfish is someone who creates a false identity online to deceive victims, often as a means of attracting romantic interest.
  • censorware - Censorware is a term used pejoratively to describe software that filters out undesirable Web sites or content.
  • CERN (Conseil Europeen pour la Recherche Nucleaire) - CERN is a high-energy particle physics organization headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland.
  • chat room - A chat room is a Web site, part of a Web site, or part of an online service such as America Online, that provides a venue for communities of users with a common interest to communicate in real time.
  • chatting - For terms frequently used in online keyboard chatting, see chat acronyms/IRC/BBS.
  • chatty protocol - A chatty protocol is an application or routing protocol that requires a client or server to wait for an acknowledgement before it can transmit again.
  • churn (agitation or turnover) - In a general context, churn is a synonym for agitation or turnover.
  • citizen journalist - A citizen journalist is an amateur journalist who usually publishes online by using a blog or community Web site.
  • click farm - A click farm is a business that pays employees to click on website elements to artificially boost the status of a client's website or a product.
  • click fraud (pay-per-click fraud) - Click fraud (sometimes called pay-per-click fraud) is the practice of artificially inflating traffic statistics for online advertisements.
  • click rate - In Web advertising, the click rate is the number of clicks on an ad on an HTML page as a percentage of the number of times that the ad was downloaded with a page.
  • click stream - In Web advertising, a click stream is the sequence of clicks or pages requested as a visitor explores a Web site.
  • clicks and mortar - Clicks and mortar, sometimes seen as clicks-and-mortar or clicks and bricks, is a type of omnichannel business model that takes advantage of both online and offline operations.
  • clickthrough rate (CTR) - In banner advertising on a Web site, the clickthrough rate (CTR) is the percentage of times that viewers of a Web page click on a given banner ad.
  • clickwrap agreement (clickthrough agreement) - A clickwrap agreement, also known as a click through, shrink-wrap, or sign-in-wrap, is an online agreement in which the user signifies his or her acceptance by clicking a button or checking a box that states “I agree.
  • cocooning - Cocooning is the act of insulating or hiding oneself from the normal social environment, which may be perceived as distracting, unfriendly, dangerous, or otherwise unwelcome, at least for the present.
  • computer exploit - A computer exploit, or exploit, is an attack on a computer system, especially one that takes advantage of a particular vulnerability the system offers to intruders.
  • connectoid - A connectoid is a dial-up connection profile using the Microsoft Windows 95 or the Windows 98 operating system.
  • COPS (Common Open Policy Service Protocol) - COPS (Common Open Policy Service Protocol) is a proposed standard protocol for exchanging network policy information between a policy decision point (PDP) in a network and policy enforcement points (PEPs) as part of overall Quality of Service (QoS) - the allocation of network traffic resources according to desired priorities of service.
  • corportal (Corporate Portal) - Corportal is short for "corporate portal.
  • CPE device - A CPE device is telecommunications hardware located at the home or business of a customer.
  • crapware - Definition - What is crapware?Crapware is an unflattering name for unwanted software or software that doesn't perform as expected.
  • crimeware - Crimeware is any computer program or set of programs designed expressly to facilitate illegal activity online.
  • crippleware - Crippleware is any software program that cannot be fully utilized until the user registers or, in the case of shareware, purchases the program.
  • cross-post - On a Web or bulletin board discussion list or a Usenet newsgroup, a cross-post is the posting (submission) of an article to more than one discussion list or newsgroup at a time.
  • cross-sell - Cross-sell is a marketing term for the practice of suggesting related products or services to a customer who is considering buying something.
  • crowdfunding - Crowdfunding is a financing method that involves soliciting relatively modest contributions from a group of individuals.
  • crowdsourcing - Crowdsourcing is the practice of turning to a body of people to obtain needed knowledge, goods or services.
  • cruft - Cruft is the elements of a program, system or product that are either useless, poorly designed or both.
  • crypto - Depending on its usage, crypto can be a short form for cryptography or for encryption.
  • Cupertino effect - The Cupertino effect is an erroneous suggestion or replacement by a spellchecker, auto-correct program or smartphone predictive text feature.
  • custom domain name suffix (custom TLD) - A custom domain name suffix, or custom TLD, is a top-level domain (TLD) name that belongs to a single organization.
  • customer-facing - Customer-facing is an adjective used to describe a hardware or software product, technology, or anything that the customer of a business deals with directly.

-ADS BY GOOGLE

SearchCompliance

  • risk management

    Risk management is the process of identifying, assessing and controlling threats to an organization's capital and earnings.

  • compliance as a service (CaaS)

    Compliance as a Service (CaaS) is a cloud service service level agreement (SLA) that specified how a managed service provider (...

  • data protection impact assessment (DPIA)

    A data protection impact assessment (DPIA) is a process designed to help organizations determine how data processing systems, ...

SearchSecurity

  • identity provider

    An identity provider is a system component that is able to provide an end user or internet-connected device with a single set of ...

  • firewall

    A firewall is software or firmware that enforces a set of rules about what data packets will be allowed to enter or leave a ...

  • encryption

    Encryption is the method by which information is converted into secret code that hides the information's true meaning. The ...

SearchHealthIT

SearchDisasterRecovery

  • business continuity plan (BCP)

    A business continuity plan (BCP) is a document that consists of the critical information an organization needs to continue ...

  • disaster recovery team

    A disaster recovery team is a group of individuals focused on planning, implementing, maintaining, auditing and testing an ...

  • cloud insurance

    Cloud insurance is any type of financial or data protection obtained by a cloud service provider. 

SearchStorage

Close