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Internet technologies

This WhatIs.com glossary contains terms related to Internet technologies, including definitions about port numbers, standards and protocols and words and phrases about how the Internet works.

3PL - DIS

  • 3PL (third-party logistics) - A 3PL (third-party logistics) provider offers outsourced logistics services, which encompass anything that involves management of one or more facets of procurement and fulfillment activities.
  • AAA server (authentication, authorization, and accounting) - An AAA server is a server program that handles user requests for access to computer resources and, for an enterprise, provides authentication, authorization, and accounting (AAA) services.
  • access log - An access log is a list of all the requests for individual files that people have requested from a Web site.
  • ActionScript - ActionScript is an object-oriented programming (OOP) language that is designed specifically for Web site animation.
  • address space - Address space is the amount of memory allocated for all possible addresses for a computational entity, such as a device, a file, a server, or a networked computer.
  • Adobe Flash Player - Adobe Flash Player is software used to stream and view video, audio and multimedia and Rich Internet Applications (RIA) on a computer or supported mobile device.
  • Ajax (Asynchronous JavaScript and XML) - Ajax (Asynchronous JavaScript and XML) is a method of building interactive applications for the Web that process user requests immediately.
  • altcoin - An altcoin is any digital cryptocurrency similar to Bitcoin.
  • alternate newsgroup (alt.) - "alt." is the prefix for any of the hundreds of "alternate" user-originated newsgroups that are part of Usenet.
  • Amazon Cloud Drive - Amazon Cloud Drive is an online storage service that allows users to upload and access music, videos, documents and photos from Web-connected devices.
  • Amazon Mechanical Turk - Amazon Mechanical Turk is a web service application program interface (API) that allows developers to integrate human intelligence into remote procedure calls (RPC).
  • Amazon Prime - Amazon Prime is a subscription membership to Amazon that offers customers premium services for a yearly or monthly fee.
  • analog telephone adapter (ATA) - An analog telephone adaptor (ATA) is a device used to connect a standard telephone to a computer or network so that the user can make calls over the Internet.
  • anti-replay protocol - The anti-replay protocol provides Internet Protocol (IP) packet-level security by making it impossible for a hacker to intercept message packets and insert changed packets into the data stream between a source computer and a destination computer.
  • Apache - Apache is a freely available Web server that is distributed under an "open source" license.
  • API management - API management is the process by which an organization creates, oversees and controls application program interfaces (APIs) in a secure and scalable environment.
  • Apple TV (Apple TV 4) - Apple TV is a set-top box that allows end users to stream multimedia content from the Internet over a television.
  • application server - An application server is a server program in a computer in a distributed network that provides the business logic for an application program.
  • Archie - Archie is a program that allows you to search the files of all the Internet FTP servers that offer anonymous FTP.
  • Artificial Intelligence of Things (AIoT) - The Artificial Intelligence of Things (AIoT) is the combination of artificial intelligence (AI) technologies with the Internet of Things (IoT) infrastructure to achieve more efficient IoT operations, improve human-machine interactions and enhance data management and analytics.
  • AS1 (Applicability Statement 1) - AS1 (Applicability Statement is a specification for Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) communications between businesses using e-mail protocols.
  • atomic clock (NIST-F1) - An atomic clock is the most accurate type of timepiece in the world, designed to measure time according to vibrations within atom s.
  • attention minute - The attention minute is a metric used to determine how much time a user is actually engaged with content.
  • authentication, authorization, and accounting (AAA) - Authentication, authorization, and accounting (AAA) is a framework for intelligently controlling access to computer resources, enforcing policies, auditing usage, and providing the information necessary to bill for services.
  • Automatic Private IP Addressing (APIPA) - Automatic Private IP Addressing (APIPA) is a feature of Windows-based operating systems (included in Windows 98, ME, 2000, and XP) that enables a computer to automatically assign itself an IP address when there is no Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) server available to perform that function.
  • autonomous system (AS) - An autonomous system (AS) in networking is a collection of one or more associated Internet Protocol (IP) prefixes with a clearly defined routing policy that governs how the AS exchanges routing information with other autonomous systems.
  • AWS IoT Button - The AWS IoT Button is a programmable, Wi-Fi-enabled handheld device that allows developers to push a button to execute a variety of actions in the Amazon Web Services public cloud.
  • B-channel (bearer channel) - In the Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN), the B-channel is the channel that carries the main data.
  • Bayesian filter - A Bayesian filter is a program that uses Bayesian logic, also called Bayesian analysis, to evaluate the header and content of an incoming e-mail message and determine the probability that it constitutes spam.
  • BeeMe (MIT Media Lab) - BeeMe is a web-based social experiment that will be hosted by the MIT Media Lab at 11pm on October 31, 2018.
  • behavioral targeting - Behavioral targeting is the presentation of content and marketing based on the previous choices of users across websites.
  • BGP (Border Gateway Protocol) - BGP (Border Gateway Protocol) is the protocol underlying the global routing system of the internet.
  • Big Tech - Big Tech is a term that refers to the most dominant and largest technology companies in their respective sectors.
  • Bitcoin - Bitcoin is a digital currency (also called crypto-currency) that is not backed by any country's central bank or government.
  • Bitcoin address - A Bitcoin address is a digital identifier that serves as a location where the cryptocurrency can be sent.
  • Bitly - Bitly is a URL shortener service that enables users to truncate webpage links.
  • BlackBerry World - BlackBerry World is the official app store for BlackBerry smartphones and tablets.
  • blade server - A blade server, sometimes referred to as a high-density server, is a compact device containing a computer used to manage and distribute data in a collection of computers and systems, called a network.
  • Blogger - Blogger is a free Web log service from Google that allows users to share text, photos and videos.
  • bookmark - Using a World Wide Web browser, a bookmark is a saved link to a Web page that has been added to a list of saved links.
  • BPEL (Business Process Execution Language) - BPEL (Business Process Execution Language) is an XML-based language that enables task-sharing in a distributed computing or grid computing environment.
  • breadcrumb trail - On a Web site, a breadcrumb trail is a navigation tool that allows a user to see where the current page is in relation to the Web site's hierarchy.
  • Broadband Technology Opportunities Program (BTOP) - The Broadband Technology Opportunities Program (BTOP) is an initiative within the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) created to promote the development and adoption of broadband throughout the United States, particularly in unserved and underserved areas.
  • browser - A browser is an application program that provides a way to look at and interact with all the information on the World Wide Web.
  • browser hijacker (browser hijacking) - A browser hijacker is a malware program that modifies web browser settings without the user's permission and redirects the user to websites the user had not intended to visit.
  • build your own broadband (BYOB) - Build your own broadband (BYOB) is a community- or individual-driven initiative to lay foundations for high-speed internet, instead of the work being performed by a traditional internet service provider (ISP) or government.
  • cable head-end - A cable head-end (or headend) is the facility at a local cable TV office that originates and communicates cable TV services and cable modem services to subscribers.
  • cache (computing) - A cache -- pronounced CASH -- is hardware or software that is used to store something, usually data, temporarily in a computing environment.
  • call control - Call control is a process that is used in telecommunications networks to monitor and maintain connections once they have been established.
  • call deflection - Call deflection is a feature of voice over IP (VoIP) that automatically redirects a call from the called endpoint to another endpoint (usually a voice mailbox) when the called endpoint is busy.
  • call detail record (CDR) - A call detail record (CDR) in voice over IP (VoIP) is a file containing information about recent system usage such as the identities of sources (points of origin), the identities of destinations (endpoints), the duration of each call, the amount billed for each call, the total usage time in the billing period, the total free time remaining in the billing period, and the running total charged during the billing period.
  • call signaling - Call signaling is a process that is used to set up a connection in a telephone network.
  • canonical name - A canonical name is the properly denoted host name of a computer or network server.
  • certificate authority (CA) - A certificate authority (CA) is a trusted entity that issues Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) certificates.
  • CIDR (Classless Inter-Domain Routing or supernetting) - CIDR (Classless Inter-Domain Routing) -- also known as supernetting -- is a method of assigning Internet Protocol (IP) addresses that improves the efficiency of address distribution and replaces the previous system based on class A, class B and class C networks.
  • CIFS (Common Internet File System) - CIFS (Common Internet File System) is a protocol that gained popularity around the year 2000, as vendors worked to establish an Internet Protocol-based file-sharing protocol.
  • Citrix XenMobile - Citrix XenMobile is mobile management software that provides mobile device management (MDM), mobile application management (MAM) and cloud file-sharing capabilities.
  • clickjacking (user-interface or UI redressing and IFRAME overlay) - Clickjacking (also known as user-interface or UI redressing and IFRAME overlay) is an exploit in which malicious coding is hidden beneath apparently legitimate buttons or other clickable content on a website.
  • clickstream analysis (clickstream analytics) - On a Web site, clickstream analysis is the process of collecting, analyzing and reporting aggregate data about which pages a website visitor visits -- and in what order.
  • cloud access security broker (CASB) - A cloud access security broker (CASB) is a software tool or service that sits between an organization's on-premises infrastructure and a cloud provider's infrastructure.
  • cloud computing - Cloud computing is a general term for anything that involves delivering hosted services over the internet.
  • CNAME - A CNAME specifies an alias or nickname for a canonical name record in a domain name system (DNS) database.
  • CoIP (communications over Internet Protocol) - CoIP (communications over Internet Protocol) is a set of standards defining the transmission of multimedia over the Internet.
  • colocation (colo) - A colocation facility, or colo, is a data center facility in which a business can rent space for servers and other computing hardware.
  • colored coin - A colored coin is a denomination of a cryptocurrency, often Bitcoin, that is repurposed by marking it with metadata.
  • com - On the Internet, "com" is one of the top-level domain names that can be used when choosing a domain name.
  • Commerce XML (cXML or Commerce Extensible Markup Language) - Commerce XML (cXML) is a standard for the online exchange of business transaction information in common formats.
  • common gateway interface (CGI) - Also see FastCGI.
  • Common Language Runtime (CLR) - The Common Language Runtime (CLR) is programming that manages the execution of programs written in any of several supported languages, allowing them to share common object-oriented classes written in any of the languages.
  • connection - In telecommunication and computing in general, a connection is the successful completion of necessary arrangements so that two or more parties (for example, people or programs) can communicate at a long distance.
  • connection-oriented - In telecommunications, connection-oriented describes a means of transmitting data in which the devices at the end points use a preliminary protocol to establish an end-to-end connection before any data is sent.
  • connectionless - In telecommunications, connectionless describes communication between two network endpoints in which a message can be sent from one endpoint to another without prior arrangement.
  • consensus algorithm - A consensus algorithm is a process in computer science used to achieve agreement on a single data value among distributed processes or systems.
  • consumerization of IT - IT consumerization is the blending of personal and business use of technology devices and applications.
  • content - Many people agree that on the World Wide Web, "content is King.
  • content filtering (information filtering) - On the Internet, content filtering (also known as information filtering) is the use of a program to screen and exclude from access or availability Web pages or e-mail that is deemed objectionable.
  • content management system (CMS) - A content management system (CMS) is a software application or set of related programs that help create and manage digital content.
  • content personalization - Content personalization is a strategy that tailors webpages and other forms of content to individual users' characteristics or preferences.
  • cookie - A cookie is information that a website puts on a user's computer.
  • corportal (Corporate Portal) - Corportal is short for "corporate portal.
  • CSS (cascading style sheets) - This definition explains the meaning of CSS (cascading style sheets) and how using them with HTML pages is a user interface (UI) development best practice that complies with the separation of concerns design pattern.
  • custom domain name suffix (custom TLD) - A custom domain name suffix, or custom TLD, is a top-level domain (TLD) name that belongs to a single organization.
  • customer self-service (CSS) - Customer self-service is a type of electronic support (e-support) that allows end users to access information and perform routine tasks without requiring the assistance of a human.
  • cyber - Cyber is a prefix used to describe a person, thing, or idea as part of the computer and information age.
  • D-channel - In the Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN), the D-channel is the channel that carries control and signalling information.
  • daemon - A daemon (pronounced DEE-muhn) is a program that runs continuously and exists for the purpose of handling periodic service requests that a computer system expects to receive.
  • data binding - Data binding is a process that allows an Internet user to manipulate Web page elements using a Web browser.
  • data source name (DSN) - A data source name (DSN) is a data structure that contains the information about a specific database that an Open Database Connectivity (ODBC) driver needs in order to connect to it.
  • DCE (Distributed Computing Environment) - In network computing, DCE (Distributed Computing Environment) is an industry-standard software technology for setting up and managing computing and data exchange in a system of distributed computers.
  • DCML (Data Center Markup Language) - DCML (Data Center Markup Language), based on Extensible Markup Language (XML), is a data format and model for exchanging information that describes a data center environment.
  • DECT (Digital Enhanced Cordless Telecommunications) - Unlike the analog cordless phones you may have in your home, DECT (Digital Enhanced Cordless Telecommunications) is a digital wireless telephone technology that is expected to make cordless phones much more common in both businesses and homes in the future.
  • deep web - The deep web is an umbrella term for parts of the internet not fully accessible through standard search engines like Google, Bing and Yahoo.
  • DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol) - DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol) is a network management protocol used to dynamically assign an Internet Protocol (IP) address to any device, or node, on a network so they can communicate using IP.
  • dial peer (addressable call endpoint) - A dial peer, also known as an addressable call endpoint, is a device that can originate or receive a call in a telephone network.
  • Digg - Digg is a social news site that allows members to raise the visibility of stories they like best and bury stories they don’t like.
  • digital rights - Digital rights are the rights of individuals as it pertains to computer access and the ability to use, create and publish digital media.
  • disappearing e-mail - Disappearing e-mail is a message sent using a type of distribution management tool for e-mail.
  • disjoint namespace - Disjoint namespace is an occurrence in Active Directory when a member computer with one Domain Name Service (DNS) primary suffix does not have the same DNS domain name as the domain of which the computers are members.
  • distributed computing - Distributed computing is a model in which components of a software system are shared among multiple computers.
SearchCompliance
  • OPSEC (operations security)

    OPSEC (operations security) is a security and risk management process and strategy that classifies information, then determines ...

  • smart contract

    A smart contract is a decentralized application that executes business logic in response to events.

  • compliance risk

    Compliance risk is an organization's potential exposure to legal penalties, financial forfeiture and material loss, resulting ...

SearchSecurity
SearchHealthIT
SearchDisasterRecovery
  • What is risk mitigation?

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

  • change control

    Change control is a systematic approach to managing all changes made to a product or system.

  • disaster recovery (DR)

    Disaster recovery (DR) is an organization's ability to respond to and recover from an event that affects business operations.

SearchStorage
  • secondary storage

    Secondary storage is persistent storage for noncritical data that doesn't need to be accessed as frequently as data in primary ...

  • optical storage

    Optical storage is any storage type in which data is written and read with a laser.

  • JBOD (just a bunch of disks)

    JBOD, which stands for 'just a bunch of disks,' is a type of multilevel configuration for disks.

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