Browse Definitions :

Internet technologies

This WhatIs.com glossary contains terms related to Internet technologies, including definitions about port numbers, standards and protocols and words and phrases about how the Internet works.

COM - EXT

  • com - On the Internet, "com" is one of the top-level domain names that can be used when choosing a domain name.
  • Commerce XML (cXML or Commerce Extensible Markup Language) - Commerce XML (cXML) is a standard for the online exchange of business transaction information in common formats.
  • common gateway interface (CGI) - Also see FastCGI.
  • Common Language Infrastructure (CLI) - Part of Microsoft's .
  • Common Language Runtime (CLR) - The Common Language Runtime (CLR) is programming that manages the execution of programs written in any of several supported languages, allowing them to share common object-oriented classes written in any of the languages.
  • Compact HTML (CHTML) - Compact HTML (CHTML or cHTML) is a subset of standard Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) adapted for use with small computing devices such as personal digital assistants (PDAs), cellular phones, and smartphones.
  • connection - In telecommunication and computing in general, a connection is the successful completion of necessary arrangements so that two or more parties (for example, people or programs) can communicate at a long distance.
  • connection-oriented - In telecommunications, connection-oriented describes a means of transmitting data in which the devices at the end points use a preliminary protocol to establish an end-to-end connection before any data is sent.
  • connectionless - In telecommunication, connectionless describes communication between two network end points in which a message can be sent from one end point to another without prior arrangement.
  • consensus algorithm - A consensus algorithm is a process in computer science used to achieve agreement on a single data value among distributed processes or systems.
  • Constellation - Constellation was the early name for the Communicator browser and related programs from Netscape Communications.
  • content - Many people agree that on the World Wide Web, "content is King.
  • content filtering (information filtering) - On the Internet, content filtering (also known as information filtering) is the use of a program to screen and exclude from access or availability Web pages or e-mail that is deemed objectionable.
  • content management system (CMS) - A content management system (CMS) is an application program for creating and managing digital content in a collaborative environment.
  • ContextAds - ContextAds is a targeted advertising program designed for the Linden Lab Second Life virtual community.
  • cookie - A cookie is information that a Web site puts on your hard disk so that it can remember something about you at a later time.
  • corportal (Corporate Portal) - Corportal is short for "corporate portal.
  • counter - On the Web, a counter is a program that counts and typically displays how many people have visited an HTML page (usually the home page).
  • CSS (cascading style sheets) - This definition explains the meaning of CSS (cascading style sheets) and how using them with HTML pages is a user interface (UI) development best practice that complies with the separation of concerns design pattern.
  • cuckoo egg - A cuckoo egg is an MP3 file that typically contains 30 seconds of the original song with the remainder of the song overwritten with cuckoo clock noises, white noise, and/or voice messages such as, "Congratulations, you must've goofed up somewhere.
  • Curl - Curl is an object-oriented programming language designed to replace HTML, JavaScript, and related tools as a means for creating interactive Web pages.
  • custom domain name suffix (custom TLD) - A custom domain name suffix, or custom TLD, is a top-level domain (TLD) name that belongs to a single organization.
  • customer self-service (CSS) - Customer self-service is a type of electronic support (e-support) that allows end users to access information and perform routine tasks without requiring the assistance of a human.
  • cyber - Cyber is a prefix used to describe a person, thing, or idea as part of the computer and information age.
  • cyborg - Cyborg, a compound word derived from cybernetics and organism, is a term coined by Manfred Clynes in 1960 to describe the need for mankind to artificially enhance biological functions in order to survive in the hostile environment of Space.
  • D-channel - In the Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN), the D-channel is the channel that carries control and signalling information.
  • daemon - A daemon (pronounced DEE-muhn) is a program that runs continuously and exists for the purpose of handling periodic service requests that a computer system expects to receive.
  • DAML (DARPA Agent Markup Language) - DAML (DARPA Agent Markup Language) is a markup language for the U.
  • DARPANET - DARPANET (or DARPANet) is a term sometimes used for the ARPANET, the early network from which today's Internet evolved.
  • dashboard - In information technology, a dashboard is a user interface that, somewhat resembling an automobile's dashboard, organizes and presents information in a way that is easy to read.
  • data binding - Data binding is a process that allows an Internet user to manipulate Web page elements using a Web browser.
  • data source name (DSN) - A data source name (DSN) is a data structure that contains the information about a specific database that an Open Database Connectivity (ODBC) driver needs in order to connect to it.
  • datagram - A datagram is, to quote the Internet's Request for Comments 1594, "a self-contained, independent entity of data carrying sufficient information to be routed from the source to the destination computer without reliance on earlier exchanges between this source and destination computer and the transporting network.
  • DCE (Distributed Computing Environment) - In network computing, DCE (Distributed Computing Environment) is an industry-standard software technology for setting up and managing computing and data exchange in a system of distributed computers.
  • DCML (Data Center Markup Language) - DCML (Data Center Markup Language), based on Extensible Markup Language (XML), is a data format and model for exchanging information that describes a data center environment.
  • DECT (Digital Enhanced Cordless Telecommunications) - Unlike the analog cordless phones you may have in your home, DECT (Digital Enhanced Cordless Telecommunications) is a digital wireless telephone technology that is expected to make cordless phones much more common in both businesses and homes in the future.
  • dedicated server - In the Web hosting business, a dedicated server refers to the rental and exclusive use of a computer that includes a Web server, related software, and connection to the Internet, housed in the Web hosting company's premises.
  • deep Web - Deep Web content includes email messages, chat messages, private content on social media sites, electronic bank statements, electronic health records and other content that is accessible over the Internet but is not crawled and indexed by search engines.
  • destreaming - Destreaming, in a multimedia context, is the practice of saving streamed data as a file.
  • deviceCOM - DeviceCOM, from Intrinsyc Software, is a line of device and network integration products that is used to make Internet or PC devices work with each other on a network.
  • DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol) - DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol) is a network management protocol used to dynamically assign an Internet Protocol (IP) address to any device, or node, on a network so they can communicate using IP.
  • dial peer (addressable call endpoint) - A dial peer, also known as an addressable call endpoint, is a device that can originate or receive a call in a telephone network.
  • dial peer hunting - Dial peer hunting is a feature of voice over IP (VoIP) systems in which the device at the originating router attempts to find an alternative addressable call endpoint if it cannot establish a connection to the intended endpoint.
  • Digg - Digg is a social news site that allows members to raise the visibility of stories they like best and bury stories they don’t like.
  • digital object identifier (DOI) - A DOI (digital object identifier) is a permanent identifier given to a Web file or other Internet document so that if its Internet address changes, users will be redirected to its new address.
  • digital rights - Digital rights are the rights of individuals as it pertains to computer access and the ability to use, create and publish digital media.
  • Digital Silhouettes - Digital Silhouettes is the trademarked name that Predictive Networks has given to user profiles that are established through gathered click stream data and artificial intelligence (AI) processes.
  • DIME (Direct Internet Message Encapsulation) - DIME (Direct Internet Message Encapsulation) is a communications specification that defines a format for attaching files to Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) messages between application programs over the Internet.
  • disappearing e-mail - Disappearing e-mail is a message sent using a type of distribution management tool for e-mail.
  • disjoint namespace - Disjoint namespace is an occurrence in Active Directory when a member computer with one Domain Name Service (DNS) primary suffix does not have the same DNS domain name as the domain of which the computers are members.
  • distributed computing - In general, distributed computing is any computing that involves programs with components shared among multiple computers.
  • DNS redirection - DNS redirection is the controversial practice of serving a Web page to a user that is different from either the one requested or one that might reasonably be expected, such as an error page.
  • Do Not Track (DNT) - Do Not Track (DNT) is a browser setting that sends a message to websites and advertising networks requesting that they don't track the user.
  • domain - In general, a domain is an area of control or a sphere of knowledge.
  • domain kiting - Domain kiting is the practice of repeatedly registering and deleting a domain name so that the registrant can, in effect, own the domain name without paying for it.
  • domain name - A domain name locates an organization or other entity on the Internet.
  • domain name system (DNS) - The domain name system (DNS) maps internet domain names to the internet protocol network addresses they represent and allows websites to use names, rather than difficult-to-remember IP addresses.
  • domain tasting - Domain tasting is the practice of purchasing numerous available domain names and then exploiting a five-day grace period to determine which names would be profitable to own.
  • Domino Off-Line Services (DOLS) - Domino Off-Line Services (DOLS) is an add-on toolkit, based on Domino replication and security features, that allows users to access and interact with Domino Web applications through a browser without requiring a network connection, and to synchronize changes to source data when they reconnect.
  • dot address - Tip:To find out the dot address (such as 205.
  • dotcom - A dotcom is any Web site intended for business use and, in some usages, it's a term for any kind of Web site.
  • downloading - Downloading is the transmission of a file from one computer system to another, usually smaller computer system.
  • drive-by spamming - Drive-by spamming is a variation of drive-by hacking in which the perpetrators gain access to a vulnerable wireless local area network (WLAN) and use that access to send huge volumes of spam.
  • DSSSL (Document Style Semantics and Specification Language) - DSSSL (Document Style Semantics and Specification Language) is a standard for the processing of SGML (Standard Generalized Markup Language) documents.
  • DXL (Domino Extensible Language) - DXL (Domino Extensible Language) is a specific version of Extensible Markup Language (XML) for Lotus Domino data.
  • dynamic DNS service - A dynamic DNS (domain name system) service is a company that charges a small fee to allow a user connecting to the Internet with a dynamic IP address to be able to use applications that require a static IP address.
  • dynamic fonts - Dynamic fonts are a feature of Netscape's Communicator suite of products that enables a Web page designer to specify or create a special font style for a Web page or site.
  • dynamic port numbers (private port numbers) - The dynamic port numbers (also known as the private port numbers) are the port numbers that are available for use by any application to use in communicating with any other application, using the Internet's Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) or the User Datagram Protocol (UDP).
  • E Ink (eInk) - E Ink is an electronic device that is similar to a computer display, but with qualities that enable it to be used for applications such as eBooks, electronic newspapers, portable signs, and foldable, rollable displays.
  • e-business (electronic business) - E-business (electronic business) is the conduct of business processes on the internet.
  • e-commerce (electronic commerce or EC) - E-commerce (EC), an abbreviation for electronic commerce, is the buying and selling of goods and services, or the transmitting of funds or data, over an electronic network, primarily the internet.
  • e-commerce hosting - E-commerce hosting is a business in which a company provides other companies whatever they need to sell their products and services on the World Wide Web - including a Web server to serve a company's pages, possibly the Web site design (including catalog pages), and the special capabilities needed to accept, process, and confirm sales orders.
  • e-mail (electronic mail or email) - E-mail (electronic mail) is the exchange of computer-stored messages by telecommunication.
  • e-paper (radio paper or electronic paper) - E-paper (sometimes called radio paper or just electronic paper) is a portable, reusable storage and display medium that looks like paper but can be repeatedly written on (refreshed) - by electronic means - thousands or millions of times.
  • e-speak - E-speak is an open software platform designed by HP to facilitate the delivery of e-services (electronic services) over the Internet.
  • E.164 - E.164 is an international numbering plan for public telephone systems in which each assigned number contains a country code (CC), a national destination code (NDC), and a subscriber number (SN).
  • E911 (Enhanced 911) - In the United States, E911 (Enhanced 91 is support for wireless phone users who dial 911, the standard number for requesting help in an emergency.
  • ear and mouth (E&M) - Ear and mouth (E&M) is a technology in voice over IP (VoIP) that uses a traditional telephone handset with an earphone (or earpiece) for listening to incoming audio and a microphone (or mouthpiece) for transmitting audio.
  • edu - edu is one of the top-level domain names that can be used when choosing a domain name.
  • egosurfing - Egosurfing is looking to see how many places on the Web your name appears.
  • electronic ink - Electronic ink is a liquid substance, in development at MIT's Media Lab in partnership with a company called E Ink, that responds to electrical impulses to enable changeable text and image displays on a flexible surface.
  • electronic newspaper - An electronic newspaper is a self-contained, reusable, and refreshable version of a traditional newspaper that acquires and holds information electronically.
  • electronic program guide (EPG) - An electronic program guide (EPG) is an application used with digital set-top boxes and newer television sets to list current and scheduled programs that are or will be available on each channel and a short summary or commentary for each program.
  • endpoint reference (EPR) - An endpoint reference (EPR) is a combination of Web services (WS) elements that define the address for a resource in a Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) header.
  • Enterprise Identity Mapping (EIM) - Enterprise Identity Mapping (EIM) is an open architecture from IBM for helping an enterprise manage the multiple user registries and identities that enable a computer user to access multiple applications with a single sign-on.
  • enterprise information portal (EIP) - The enterprise information portal (EIP), also known as a business portal, is a concept for a Web site that serves as a single gateway to a company's information and knowledge base for employees and possibly for customers, business partners, and the general public as well.
  • enterprise search - There are a number of kinds of enterprise search including local installations, hosted versions, and search appliances, sometimes called “search in a box.
  • Enterprise Service Bus (ESB) - An enterprise service bus (ESB) is a middleware tool used to distribute work among connected components of an application.
  • entity tag (ETag) - ETags use persistent identification elements (PIE) that have been tagged to the user’s browser.
  • ENUM - ENUM is a standard adopted by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) that uses the domain name system (DNS) to map telephone numbers to Web addresses or uniform resource locators (URL).
  • environment variable - An environment variable defines some aspect of a user's or a program's environment that can vary.
  • EtherLoop - EtherLoop, sometimes called next generation DSL or second generation DSL, combines features of Digital Subscriber Line (DSL) with features of Ethernet to provide both voice and data transmission (including Internet connection) over any ordinary phone line at data rates faster than DSL.
  • ethical worm - An ethical worm is a program that automates network-based distribution of security patches for known vulnerabilities.
  • ETRN (Extended Turn) - ETRN (Extended Turn) is an extension to the Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP) that allows an SMTP server to send a request to another SMTP server to send any e-mail messages it has.
  • Evernet - The term Evernet has been used to describe the convergence of wireless, broadband, and Internet telephony technologies that will result in the ability to be continuously connected to the Web anywhere using virtually any information device.
  • Evernote - Evernote is a cloud-based note-taking and file-storage application that synchronizes data across multiple devices.
  • Exchange Online - Exchange Online is the hosted version of Microsoft's Exchange Server messaging platform that organizations can obtain as a stand-alone service or via an Office 365 subscription.
  • Express Wi-Fi - Express Wi-Fi by Facebook is the social media company's effort to bring wireless internet via public Wi-Fi hot spots to areas of the world without available or reliable connections to the internet.

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