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Internet technologies

This WhatIs.com glossary contains terms related to Internet technologies, including definitions about port numbers, standards and protocols and words and phrases about how the Internet works.

DOM - INT

  • domain - In general, a domain is an area of control or a sphere of knowledge.
  • domain kiting - Domain kiting is the practice of repeatedly registering and deleting a domain name so that the registrant can, in effect, own the domain name without paying for it.
  • domain name system (DNS) - The domain name system (DNS) is a naming database in which internet domain names are located and translated into Internet Protocol (IP) addresses.
  • dot address - Tip:To find out the dot address (such as 205.
  • downloading - Downloading is the transmission of a file or data from one computer to another over a network, usually from a larger server to a user device.
  • dynamic IP address - A dynamic IP address is a temporary address for devices connected to a network that will continually change over time.
  • dynamic port numbers - Dynamic port numbers, also known as private port numbers, are the port numbers that are available for use by any application to use in communicating with any other application, using the internet's Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) or User Datagram Protocol (UDP).
  • e-business (electronic business) - E-business (electronic business) is the conduct of business processes on the internet.
  • e-commerce - E-commerce (electronic commerce) is the buying and selling of goods and services, or the transmitting of funds or data, over an electronic network, primarily the internet.
  • e-commerce hosting - E-commerce hosting is a business in which a company provides other companies whatever they need to sell their products and services on the World Wide Web - including a Web server to serve a company's pages, possibly the Web site design (including catalog pages), and the special capabilities needed to accept, process, and confirm sales orders.
  • e-paper (radio paper or electronic paper) - E-paper (sometimes called radio paper or just electronic paper) is a portable, reusable storage and display medium that looks like paper but can be repeatedly written on (refreshed) - by electronic means - thousands or millions of times.
  • E.164 - E.164 is an international numbering plan for public telephone systems in which each assigned number contains a country code (CC), a national destination code (NDC), and a subscriber number (SN).
  • E911 (Enhanced 911) - In the United States, E911 (Enhanced 91 is support for wireless phone users who dial 911, the standard number for requesting help in an emergency.
  • edu - edu is one of the top-level domain names that can be used when choosing a domain name.
  • electronic ink - Electronic ink is a liquid substance, in development at MIT's Media Lab in partnership with a company called E Ink, that responds to electrical impulses to enable changeable text and image displays on a flexible surface.
  • email - Email (electronic mail) is the exchange of computer-stored messages by telecommunication.
  • email address internationalization (EAI) - Email address internationalization (EAI) is a process that enables email addresses with either the domain name or mailbox name in different languages and scripts to work properly when sending and receiving emails.
  • endpoint reference (EPR) - An endpoint reference (EPR) is a combination of Web services (WS) elements that define the address for a resource in a Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) header.
  • enterprise search - There are a number of kinds of enterprise search including local installations, hosted versions, and search appliances, sometimes called “search in a box.
  • Enterprise Service Bus (ESB) - An enterprise service bus (ESB) is a software platform used to distribute work among connected components of an application.
  • entity tag (ETag) - ETags use persistent identification elements (PIE) that have been tagged to the user’s browser.
  • Evernote - Evernote is a cloud-based note-taking and file-storage application that synchronizes data across multiple devices.
  • Exchange Online - Exchange Online is the hosted version of Microsoft's Exchange Server messaging platform that organizations can obtain as a stand-alone service or via an Office 365 subscription.
  • Express Wi-Fi - Express Wi-Fi by Facebook is the social media company's effort to bring wireless internet via public Wi-Fi hot spots to areas of the world without available or reliable connections to the internet.
  • Extensible Authentication Protocol (EAP) - The Extensible Authentication Protocol (EAP) is a protocol for wireless networks that expands the authentication methods used by the Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP), a protocol often used when connecting a computer to the internet.
  • extranet - An extranet is a private network that enterprises use to provide trusted third parties -- such as suppliers, vendors, partners, customers and other businesses -- secure, controlled access to business information or operations.
  • Facebook - Facebook is a social networking website that was founded in February 2004 by Harvard University students Chris Hughes, Andrew McCollum, Dustin Moskovitz, Eduardo Saverin and Mark Zuckerberg.
  • Facebook Live - Facebook Live is a feature for live broadcast of user videos from the Facebook mobile app.
  • Facebook M - Facebook M is the social media company’s personal digital assistant for the Messenger mobile app.
  • Facebook Marketplace - Facebook Marketplace is classified-ad section of the social network that specializes in helping individuals and businesses sell items locally.
  • Facebook Portal - Facebook Portal is the social media network company's brand of smart displays.
  • Facebook Workplace - Facebook Workplace is the social networking company’s enterprise-level collaboration tool.
  • FaceTime - FaceTime is an Apple video telephony application that allows users to make a video call over the internet with a forward-facing camera on iOS and macOS devices.
  • fast flux DNS - Fast flux DNS is a technique that a cybercriminal can use to prevent identification of his key host server's IP address.
  • fast retransmit and recovery (FRR) - In TCP/IP, fast retransmit and recovery (FRR) is a congestion control algorithm that makes it possible to quickly recover lost data packets.
  • finger - Finger is a program that tells you the name associated with an e-mail address.
  • Firefox - Firefox is a Web browser that is smaller, faster, and in some ways more secure than the Netscape browser from which much of its code was derived.
  • Flash cookie - Flash cookies, also known as local shared objects (LSO), are text files stored on a user’s hard drive when a browsers requests content that's supported by Adobe Flash.
  • Forward DNS lookup - Forward DNS lookup is using an Internet domain name to find an IP address.
  • frames (web site) - In creating a Web site, frames is the use of multiple, independently controllable sections on a Web presentation.
  • frictionless checkout - Frictionless checkout is a collection of technologies and processes used to make online and retail shopping faster and easier for consumers.
  • frictionless commerce - Frictionless commerce is a method of using data from devices, apps and websites to integrate buying opportunities as simply and seamlessly as possible into consumers’ everyday activities and natural environments.
  • FTP (File Transfer Protocol) - FTP (File Transfer Protocol) is a network protocol for transmitting files between computers over TCP/IP connections.
  • fully qualified domain name (FQDN) - A fully-qualified domain name (FQDN) is that portion of an Internet Uniform Resource Locator (URL) that fully identifies the server program that an Internet request is addressed to.
  • fuzzy search - A fuzzy search is a process that locates Web pages that are likely to be relevant to a search argument even when the argument does not exactly correspond to the desired information.
  • gamification - Gamification is the application of game theory concepts and techniques to non-game activities.
  • gateway - A gateway is a network node used in telecommunications that connects two networks with different transmission protocols together.
  • giant - In networks, a giant is a packet, frame, cell, or other transmission unit that is too large.
  • Gmail - Gmail (pronounced Gee-mail) is a free Web-based e-mail service that provides users with a gigabyte of storage for messages and provides the ability to search for specific messages.
  • GMPLS (Generalized Multiprotocol Label Switching or Multiprotocol Lambda Switching) - GMPLS (Generalized Multiprotocol Label Switching) is a networking technology that enables fast and reliable network switching of data flows on any type of network infrastructure.
  • Google Chrome browser - Google Chrome browser is an open source program for accessing the World Wide Web and running Web-based applications.
  • Google Chrome OS - Google Chrome OS is an open source lightweight operating system (OS).
  • Google Hangouts - Google Hangouts is a unified communications service that allows members to initiate and participate in text, voice or video chats, either one-on-one or in a group.
  • Google Street View - Google Street View is a feature of Google Maps that enables users to view and navigate through 360 degree horizontal and 290 degree vertical panoramic street level images of various cities around the world.
  • Google Trends - Google Trends is a free service provided by Google that displays how often specific keywords, subjects and phrases have been searched for on Google over a period of time.
  • Google Voice - Google Voice allows registered members to link their mobile phones, IP telephony applications and land line phones to a single Google Voice phone number.
  • Google Wallet - Google Wallet is a mobile payment system developed by Google that allows smartphone users to store debit and credit card information for online and in-store purchases.
  • Googlebot - Googlebot is the web crawling software search bot (also known as a spider or webcrawler) that gathers the web page information used to supply Google search engine results pages (SERP).
  • Gopher - From about 1992 through 1996, Gopher was an Internet application in which hierarchically-organized text files could be brought from servers all over the world to a viewer on your computer.
  • gov - gov is one of the top-level domain names that can be used when choosing a domain name.
  • grid computing - Grid computing is a system for connecting a large number of computer nodes into a distributed architecture that delivers the compute resources necessary to solve complex problems.
  • H.245 - H.245 is a protocol for the transmission of call management and control signals in packet-based networks using H.
  • hairpinning - In general telecommunication, hairpinning is returning a message from an origin endpoint back in the direction it came from as a way to get it to its destination endpoint.
  • HELLO packet - A HELLO packet is a special data packet (message) that is sent out periodically from a router to establish and confirm network adjacency relationships to other routers in the Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) communications protocol.
  • HipChat - Atlassian HipChat allows employees to collaborate, work as teams and manage goals, all in real time, whether they work in the same office building or are located around the world.
  • home page - For a Web user, the home page is the first Web page that is displayed after starting a Web browser like Netscape's Navigator or Microsoft's Internet Explorer.
  • hop off - Hop off is a term used in telecommunications that refers to a point at which a signal or call leaves a network and moves to another network.
  • host (in computing) - A host (also known as "network host") is a computer or other device that communicates with other hosts on a network.
  • hosting (Web site hosting, Web hosting, and Webhosting) - Hosting (also known as Web site hosting, Web hosting, and Webhosting) is the business of housing, serving, and maintaining files for one or more Web sites.
  • HTML 4.0 - HTML 4.0 was the final version of the Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) before the Extensible Markup Language (XHTML) and remains the set of markup on which most large Web sites today are based.
  • HTML 5 desktop client - An HTML5 desktop client is a type of remote desktop client that provides an end user with access to a desktop or application through a web browser.
  • HTML validator - An HTML validator is a quality assurance program used to check Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) markup elements for syntax errors.
  • HTML5 - HTML 5 is a revision of the Hypertext Markup Language (HTML), the standard programming language for describing the contents and appearance of Web pages.
  • HTTP (Hypertext Transfer Protocol) - HTTP (Hypertext Transfer Protocol) is the set of rules for transferring files -- such as text, images, sound, video and other multimedia files -- over the web.
  • HTTP 1.1 - HTTP 1.1 is the latest version of Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP), the World Wide Web application protocol that runs on top of the Internet's TCP/IP suite of protocols.
  • HTTPS (HTTP over SSL or HTTP Secure) - HTTPS (HTTP over SSL or HTTP Secure) is the use of Secure Socket Layer (SSL) or Transport Layer Security (TLS) as a sublayer under regular HTTP application layering.
  • hypertext - Hypertext is the organization of information units into connected associations that a user can choose to make.
  • iBeacon - iBeacon is a small-scale network device that uses Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) and acts as a transmitter to detect and track smartphones.
  • IBM Roadrunner - Roadrunner is the fastest supercomputer in the world, twice as fast as Blue Gene and six times as fast as any of the other current supercomputers.
  • IDoc (intermediate document) - IDoc (intermediate document) is a standard data structure used in SAP applications to transfer data to and from SAP system applications and external systems.
  • IEEE 802 wireless standards - The IEEE 802 standard is a collection of networking standards that cover the physical and data-link layer specifications for technologies such as Ethernet and wireless.
  • IFrame (Inline Frame) - The IFrame HTML element is often used to insert content from another source, such as an advertisement, into a Web page.
  • image content search - Image content search is the capacity for software to recognize objects in digital images and return a search engine results page (SERP) based on a user query.
  • image recognition - Image recognition, in the context of machine vision, is the ability of software to identify objects, places, people, writing and actions in images.
  • impression - In Web advertising, the term impression is sometimes used as a synonym for view, as in ad view.
  • Instagram - Instagram is a free, online photo-sharing application and social network platform that was acquired by Facebook in 2012.
  • instant messaging - Instant messaging, often shortened to IM or IM'ing, is the exchange of near real-time messages through a standalone application or embedded software.
  • INSTEON protocol - INSTEON protocol is a communication language for home automation device control by Smartlabs.
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  • pure risk

    Pure risk refers to risks that are beyond human control and result in a loss or no loss with no possibility of financial gain.

  • risk reporting

    Risk reporting is a method of identifying risks tied to or potentially impacting an organization's business processes.

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    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

  • fault-tolerant

    Fault-tolerant technology is a capability of a computer system, electronic system or network to deliver uninterrupted service, ...

  • synchronous replication

    Synchronous replication is the process of copying data over a storage area network, local area network or wide area network so ...

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