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Internet technologies

This WhatIs.com glossary contains terms related to Internet technologies, including definitions about port numbers, standards and protocols and words and phrases about how the Internet works.

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  • connection - In telecommunication and computing in general, a connection is the successful completion of necessary arrangements so that two or more parties (for example, people or programs) can communicate at a long distance.
  • connectionless - In telecommunications, connectionless describes communication between two network endpoints in which a message can be sent from one endpoint to another without prior arrangement.
  • Consensus Algorithm - A consensus algorithm is a process in computer science used to achieve agreement on a single data value among distributed processes or systems.
  • consumerization of IT - The consumerization of IT refers to how software and hardware products designed for personal use migrated into the enterprise and were used for work purposes.
  • content - Many people agree that on the World Wide Web, "content is King.
  • content filtering - Content filtering is a process involving the use of software or hardware to screen and/or restrict access to objectionable email, webpages, executables and other suspicious items.
  • content management system (CMS) - A content management system (CMS) is a software application or set of related programs that help create and manage digital content.
  • content personalization - Content personalization is a strategy that tailors webpages and other forms of content to individual users' characteristics or preferences.
  • cookie - A cookie is information that a website puts on a user's computer.
  • corportal (corporate portal) - Corportals, short for corporate portals, are sometimes referred to as enterprise information portals and are used by corporations to build their internal web presence by leveraging a company's information resources.
  • crowdfunding - Crowdfunding is a financing method that involves soliciting relatively modest contributions from a group of individuals.
  • CSS (cascading style sheets) - This definition explains the meaning of cascading style sheets (CSS) and how using them with HTML pages is a user interface (UI) development best practice that complies with the separation of concerns design pattern.
  • Ctrl-Alt-Delete - On a personal computer with the Microsoft Windows operating system, Control+Alt+Delete is the combination of the Ctrl key, the Alt key, and Del key that a user can press at the same time to terminate an application task or to reboot the operating system.
  • custom domain name suffix (custom TLD) - A custom domain name suffix, or custom TLD, is a top-level domain (TLD) name that belongs to a single organization.
  • customer self-service (CSS) - Customer self-service is a type of electronic support (e-support) that allows end users to access information and perform routine tasks without requiring the assistance of a human.
  • customer service and support - Customer service is the support that organizations offer to customers before and after purchasing a product or service.
  • cyber - Cyber is a prefix used to describe a person, thing, or idea as part of the computer and information age.
  • cyberpsychology - Cyberpsychology is the field of study pertaining to the way people interact through computers or digital devices and the emotional effects that usage has on the brain.
  • cyberspace - Cyberspace is a domain characterized by the use of electronics and the electromagnetic spectrum to store, modify, and exchange data via networked systems and associated physical infrastructures.
  • D-channel - In the Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN), the D-channel is the channel that carries control and signalling information.
  • daemon - A daemon (pronounced DEE-muhn) is a program that runs continuously and exists for the purpose of handling periodic service requests that a computer system expects to receive.
  • dark mode - Dark mode is a color scheme change for user interfaces (UI) on webpages, apps and programs that displays light text on a dark background for easier viewing.
  • dark social - Dark social is a term used by marketers and search engine optimization (SEO) specialists to describe website referrals that are difficult to track.
  • dark web (darknet) - The dark web, also referred to as the darknet, is an encrypted portion of the internet that is not indexed by search engines and requires specific configuration or authorization to access.
  • data source name (DSN) - A data source name (DSN) is a data structure that contains the information about a specific database that an Open Database Connectivity (ODBC) driver needs in order to connect to it.
  • DCE (Distributed Computing Environment) - In network computing, DCE (Distributed Computing Environment) is an industry-standard software technology for setting up and managing computing and data exchange in a system of distributed computers.
  • death by PowerPoint - Death by PowerPoint is a phenomenon caused by the poor use of presentation software.
  • DECT (Digital Enhanced Cordless Telecommunications) - Unlike the analog cordless phones you may have in your home, DECT (Digital Enhanced Cordless Telecommunications) is a digital wireless telephone technology that is expected to make cordless phones much more common in both businesses and homes in the future.
  • deep web - The deep web is an umbrella term for parts of the internet not fully accessible through standard search engines like Google, Bing and Yahoo.
  • desktop gadget - A desktop gadget is a software widget, or a small application, that is designed to sit on a user's desktop screen in much the same way that apps reside on smartphones and tablets.
  • DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol) - DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol) is a network management protocol used to dynamically assign an Internet Protocol (IP) address to any device, or node, on a network so they can communicate using IP.
  • dial peer (addressable call endpoint) - A dial peer, also known as an addressable call endpoint, is a device that can originate or receive a call in a telephone network.
  • Digg - Digg is a social news site that allows members to raise the visibility of stories they like best and bury stories they don’t like.
  • digital divide - The digital divide is a term that refers to the gap between demographics and regions that have access to modern information and communications technology, and those that don't or have restricted access.
  • digital drugs - Digital drugs, more accurately called binaural beats, are sounds that are thought to be capable of changing brain wave patterns and inducing an altered state of consciousness similar to that effected by taking drugs or achieving a deep state of meditation.
  • digital rights - Digital rights are the rights of individuals as it pertains to computer access and the ability to use, create and publish digital media.
  • digital tattoo - With more than one meaning, a digital tattoo is to a temporary tattoo that is outfitted with electronics, such as sensors or a near field communication (NFC) chip.
  • disappearing e-mail - Disappearing e-mail is a message sent using a type of distribution management tool for e-mail.
  • disjoint namespace - Disjoint namespace is an occurrence in Active Directory when a member computer with one Domain Name Service (DNS) primary suffix does not have the same DNS domain name as the domain of which the computers are members.
  • disk cloning - Disk cloning is the act of copying the contents of a computer's hard drive.
  • distributed computing - Distributed computing is a model in which components of a software system are shared among multiple computers.
  • distributed learning - Distributed learning is a general term used to describe a multi-media method of instructional delivery that includes a mix of Web-based instruction, streaming video conferencing, face-to-face classroom time, distance learning through television or video, or other combinations of electronic and traditional educational models.
  • distributor - A distributor is an intermediary entity between a the producer of a product and another entity in the distribution channel or supply chain, such as a retailer, a value-added reseller (VAR) or a system integrator (SI).
  • DNS redirection - DNS redirection is the controversial practice of serving a Web page to a user that is different from either the one requested or one that might reasonably be expected, such as an error page.
  • Do Not Track (DNT) - Do Not Track (DNT) is a browser setting that sends a message to websites and advertising networks requesting that they don't track the user.
  • domain - Specific to the internet, the term domain can refer to how the internet is structured, and domain also refers to how an organization's network resources are organized.
  • domain kiting - Domain kiting is the practice of repeatedly registering and deleting a domain name so that the registrant can, in effect, own the domain name without paying for it.
  • domain name system (DNS) - The domain name system (DNS) is a naming database in which internet domain names are located and translated into Internet Protocol (IP) addresses.
  • dopamine-driven feedback loop - A dopamine-driven feedback loop is a self-perpetuating circuit fueled by the way the neurotransmitter works with the brain’s reward system.
  • dot address - Tip:To find out the dot address (such as 205.
  • downloading - Downloading is the transmission of a file or data from one computer to another over a network, usually from a larger server to a user device.
  • dynamic IP address - A dynamic IP address is a temporary address for devices connected to a network that will continually change over time.
  • dynamic port numbers - Dynamic port numbers, also known as private port numbers, are the port numbers that are available for use by any application to use in communicating with any other application, using the internet's Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) or User Datagram Protocol (UDP).
  • e-business (electronic business) - E-business (electronic business) is the conduct of business processes on the internet.
  • e-commerce - E-commerce (electronic commerce) is the buying and selling of goods and services, or the transmitting of funds or data, over an electronic network, primarily the internet.
  • e-commerce hosting - E-commerce hosting is a business in which a company provides other companies whatever they need to sell their products and services on the World Wide Web - including a Web server to serve a company's pages, possibly the Web site design (including catalog pages), and the special capabilities needed to accept, process, and confirm sales orders.
  • e-paper (radio paper or electronic paper) - E-paper (sometimes called radio paper or just electronic paper) is a portable, reusable storage and display medium that looks like paper but can be repeatedly written on (refreshed) - by electronic means - thousands or millions of times.
  • E.164 - E.164 is an international numbering plan for public telephone systems in which each assigned number contains a country code (CC), a national destination code (NDC), and a subscriber number (SN).
  • E911 (Enhanced 911) - In the United States, E911 (Enhanced 91 is support for wireless phone users who dial 911, the standard number for requesting help in an emergency.
  • edu - edu is one of the top-level domain names that can be used when choosing a domain name.
  • electronic ink - Electronic ink is a liquid substance, in development at MIT's Media Lab in partnership with a company called E Ink, that responds to electrical impulses to enable changeable text and image displays on a flexible surface.
  • electronic newspaper - An electronic newspaper is a self-contained, reusable, and refreshable version of a traditional newspaper that acquires and holds information electronically.
  • email - Email (electronic mail) is the exchange of computer-stored messages by telecommunication.
  • email address internationalization (EAI) - Email address internationalization (EAI) is a process that enables email addresses with either the domain name or mailbox name in different languages and scripts to work properly when sending and receiving emails.
  • emoticon - An emoticon is a short sequence of keyboard letters and symbols, usually emulating a facial expression, that complements a text message.
  • empirical analysis - Empirical analysis is an evidence-based approach to the study and interpretation of information.
  • endpoint reference (EPR) - An endpoint reference (EPR) is a combination of Web services (WS) elements that define the address for a resource in a Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) header.
  • Enterprise Service Bus (ESB) - An enterprise service bus (ESB) is a software platform used to distribute work among connected components of an application.
  • entity tag (ETag) - ETags use persistent identification elements (PIE) that have been tagged to the user’s browser.
  • EPEAT (Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool) - EPEAT (Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool) is a ranking system that helps purchasers in the public and private sectors evaluate, compare and select desktop computers, notebooks and monitors based on their environmental attributes.
  • Evernote - Evernote is a cloud-based note-taking and file-storage application that synchronizes data across multiple devices.
  • Exchange Online - Exchange Online is the hosted version of Microsoft's Exchange Server messaging platform that organizations can obtain as a stand-alone service or via an Office 365 subscription.
  • expanded memory - Expanded memory, also know as EMS (Expanded Memory Specification) was a method used to increase the 640KB upper limit of MS-DOS to 1MB using a gated memory riser card.
  • Express Wi-Fi - Express Wi-Fi by Facebook is the social media company's effort to bring wireless internet via public Wi-Fi hot spots to areas of the world without available or reliable connections to the internet.
  • Extensible Authentication Protocol (EAP) - The Extensible Authentication Protocol (EAP) is a protocol for wireless networks that expands the authentication methods used by the Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP), a protocol often used when connecting a computer to the internet.
  • extranet - An extranet is a private network that enterprises use to provide trusted third parties -- such as suppliers, vendors, partners, customers and other businesses -- secure, controlled access to business information or operations.
  • Facebook - Facebook is a social networking website that was founded in February 2004 by Harvard University students Chris Hughes, Andrew McCollum, Dustin Moskovitz, Eduardo Saverin and Mark Zuckerberg.
  • Facebook "fan" - A Facebook "fan" is a user who "likes" a particular page.
  • Facebook "Like" button - The Facebook "Like" button is a feature that allows users to show their support for specific comments, pictures, wall posts, statuses, or fan pages.
  • Facebook Connect - Facebook Connect is a single sign-on application which allows users to interact on other websites through their Facebook account.
  • Facebook event - A Facebook event is a calendar-based resource which can be used to notify users of upcoming occasions.
  • Facebook group - A Facebook group is a page created for an organization or business to promote activities.
  • Facebook Insights - Facebook Insights is Facebook's version of web page analysis, which allows a user to keep track of information such as page views, unique views, fan statistics, wall posts, video and audio plays, photo views, and so on.
  • Facebook Live - Facebook Live is a feature for live broadcast of user videos from the Facebook mobile app.
  • Facebook M - Facebook M is the social media company’s personal digital assistant for the Messenger mobile app.
  • Facebook Marketplace - Facebook Marketplace is classified-ad section of the social network that specializes in helping individuals and businesses sell items locally.
  • Facebook Mobile - Facebook Mobile is a feature that allows a user to access Facebook from their cell phone through text messages, e-mails, downloaded applications or a web browser.
  • Facebook page - A Facebook page is a public profile specifically created for businesses, brands, celebrities, causes, and other organizations.
  • Facebook status - A Facebook status is a social media update feature that enables users to discuss their thoughts, whereabouts or important information with their friends from their Facebook profile.
  • Facebook wall - A Facebook wall is the area on a profile or page where friends and fans can post their thoughts, views, or criticisms for everyone to see.
  • Facebook Workplace - Facebook Workplace is the social networking company’s enterprise-level collaboration tool.
  • FaceTime - FaceTime is an Apple video telephony application that allows users to make a video call over the internet with a forward-facing camera on iOS and macOS devices.
  • fast flux DNS - Fast flux DNS is a technique that a cybercriminal can use to prevent identification of his key host server's IP address.
  • fast retransmit and recovery (FRR) - In TCP/IP, fast retransmit and recovery (FRR) is a congestion control algorithm that makes it possible to quickly recover lost data packets.
  • Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) - The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) is an independent agency of the United States (U.
  • fiber jumper - A fiber jumper, sometimes called a fiber patch cord is a length of fiber cabling fitted with LC, SC, MTRJ or ST connectors at each end.
  • file transfer - File transfer is the movement of one or more files from one location to another.
  • FileZilla - FileZilla is a free, open source, file transfer protocol (FTP) software tool.
  • finger - Finger is a program that tells you the name associated with an e-mail address.
  • Firefox - Firefox is a Web browser that is smaller, faster, and in some ways more secure than the Netscape browser from which much of its code was derived.
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  • virtual network functions (VNFs)

    Virtual network functions (VNFs) are virtualized tasks formerly carried out by proprietary, dedicated hardware.

  • network functions virtualization (NFV)

    Network functions virtualization (NFV) is a network architecture model designed to virtualize network services that have ...

SearchSecurity
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  • insider threat

    An insider threat is a category of risk posed by those who have access to an organization's physical or digital assets.

SearchCIO
  • data privacy (information privacy)

    Data privacy, also called information privacy, is an aspect of data protection that addresses the proper storage, access, ...

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    Leadership skills are the strengths and abilities individuals demonstrate that help to oversee processes, guide initiatives and ...

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    A data governance policy is a documented set of guidelines for ensuring that an organization's data and information assets are ...

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    A data clean room is a technology service that helps content platforms keep first person user data private when interacting with ...

  • recommerce

    Recommerce is the selling of previously owned items through online marketplaces to buyers who reuse, recycle or resell them.

  • implementation

    Implementation is the execution or practice of a plan, a method or any design, idea, model, specification, standard or policy for...

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