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Internet technologies

This WhatIs.com glossary contains terms related to Internet technologies, including definitions about port numbers, standards and protocols and words and phrases about how the Internet works.

INT - RIC

  • integration server - An integration server is a type of computer server that facilitates the interaction between different operating systems (OSes), services and applications across an enterprise IT environment.
  • interactive video - Interactive video (IV) is a multimedia recording that can take user input to perform some action.
  • Interactive Voice Response (IVR) - Interactive Voice Response (IVR) is an automated telephony system that interacts with callers, gathers information and routes calls to the appropriate recipients.
  • interactivity - In computers, interactivity is the dialog that occurs between a human being (or possibly another live creature) and a computer program.
  • Internet - The Internet, sometimes called simply "the Net," is a worldwide system of computer networks -- a network of networks in which users at any one computer can, if they have permission, get information from any other computer (and sometimes talk directly to users at other computers).
  • Internet Information Services (IIS) - Internet Information Services (IIS) is a flexible, general-purpose web server from Microsoft that runs on Windows systems to serve requested HTML pages or files.
  • internet metering - Internet metering is a service model in which an internet service provider (ISP) keeps track of bandwidth use and charges users accordingly.
  • Internet Movie Database (IMDb) - The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database that provides information to consumers about movies, TV and film industry professionals.
  • Internet Protocol (IP) - The Internet Protocol (IP) is the method or protocol by which data is sent from one computer to another on the internet.
  • Internet TV - Internet TV (ITV) is generally-available content distributed over the Internet.
  • Internet.org - Internet.org is an initiative to make the Web affordable and accessible for people in developing and disadvantaged areas of the world.
  • intranet - An intranet is a private network contained within an enterprise that is used to securely share company information and computing resources among employees.
  • IOTA - IOTA is a distributed ledger technology for IoT devices that will facilitate machine to machine (M2M) transactions in the M2M economy.
  • IP address (Internet Protocol Address) - This definition is based on Internet Protocol Version 4.
  • IP PBX (private branch exchange) - An IP PBX is a private branch exchange (telephone switching system within an enterprise) that switches calls between VoIP (voice over Internet Protocol or IP) users on local lines while allowing all users to share a certain number of external phone lines.
  • IP telephony (Internet Protocol telephony) - IP telephony (Internet Protocol telephony) is a general term for technologies, products and services that use the Internet Protocol's packet-switched connections to support voice calling, voicemail, video calling, video conferencing, faxing and instant messaging.
  • iPad - The iPad is a touchscreen tablet PC made by Apple.
  • iPad 2 - The iPad 2 is a 9.
  • iptables - Iptables is a generic table structure that defines rules and commands as part of the netfilter framework that facilitates Network Address Translation (NAT), packet filtering, and packet mangling in the Linux 2.
  • IPv6 address - An IPv6 address is a 128-bit alphanumeric value that identifies an endpoint device in an Internet Protocol Version 6 (IPv6) network.
  • ISA Server - Microsoft's ISA Server (Internet Security and Acceleration Server) was the successor to Microsoft's Proxy Server 2.
  • iSCSI (Internet Small Computer System Interface) - ISCSI is a transport layer protocol that describes how Small Computer System Interface (SCSI) packets should be transported over a TCP/IP network.
  • ISP (Internet service provider) - An ISP (Internet service provider) is a company that provides individuals and other companies access to the Internet and other related services such as Web site building and virtual hosting.
  • Java Card - Java Card is an open standard from Sun Microsystems for a smart card development platform.
  • Java Server Page (JSP) - Java Server Page (JSP) is a technology for controlling the content or appearance of Web pages through the use of servlets, small programs that are specified in the Web page and run on the Web server to modify the Web page before it is sent to the user who requested it.
  • JavaScript hijacking - JavaScript hijacking is a technique that an attacker can use to read sensitive data from a vulnerable Web application, particularly one using Ajax (Asynchronous JavaScript and XML).
  • JHTML (Java within Hypertext Markup Language) - JHTML (Java within Hypertext Markup Language) is a standard for including a Java program as part of a Web page (a page written using the Hypertext Markup Language, or HTML).
  • join.me - Join.me is an online meeting and screen-sharing application by LogMeIn.
  • JRun - JRun is an application server from Macromedia that is based on Sun Microsystems' Java 2 Platform, Enterprise Edition (J2EE).
  • JSON (Javascript Object Notation) - JSON (JS Object Notation) is a text-based, human-readable data interchange format used for representing simple data structures and objects in Web browser-based code.
  • JTAPI (Java Telephony Application Programming Interface) - JTAPI (Java Telephony Application Programming Interface) is a Java-based application programming interface (API) for computer telephony applications.
  • jump page - In Web advertising and marketing, a jump page is a Web page that is made to appear temporarily in order to capture the user's attention as a promotion or to gather user information in a survey.
  • Keyhole Markup Language (KML) - Keyhole Markup Language (KML) is an XML-based markup language designed to annotate and overlay visualizations on various two-dimensional, Web-based online maps or three-dimensional Earth browsers (such as Google Earth).
  • LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP) - LAMP is an open source Web development platform that uses Linux as the operating system, Apache as the Web server, MySQL as the relational database management system and PHP as the object-oriented scripting language.
  • Layer Two Tunneling Protocol (L2TP) - Layer Two Tunneling Protocol (L2TP) is an extension of the Point-to-Point Tunneling Protocol (PPTP) used by an internet service provider (ISP) to enable the operation of a virtual private network (VPN) over the internet.
  • LDAP (Lightweight Directory Access Protocol) - LDAP (Lightweight Directory Access Protocol) is a software protocol for enabling anyone to locate data such as organizations, individuals and other resources such as files and devices in a network -- whether on the public internet or on a corporate intranet.
  • lead generator - A lead generator is any marketing-related activity intended to publicize the availability of a vendor's product or service.
  • LEAP (Lightweight Extensible Authentication Protocol) - LEAP (Lightweight Extensible Authentication Protocol) is a Cisco-proprietary version of EAP, the authentication protocol used in wireless networks and Point-to-Point connections.
  • lights-out management (LOM) - Lights-out management (LOM) is a form of out-of-band management.
  • link - Using hypertext, a link is a selectable connection from one word, picture, or information object to another.
  • Link Control Protocol (LCP) - In computer networking, Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP) provides a standard way to transport multiprotocol data over point-to-point links; within PPP, Link Control Protocol (LCP) establishes, configures and tests data link internet connections.
  • link type - In Hyper-G and possibly other hypertext systems, a link type is the specification of the nature of the information object being linked to.
  • LiveJournal - LiveJournal is a social media platform that allows users to keep a blog, journal or diary and share their interests with LiveJournal friends or communities around the world.
  • load balancing - Load balancing is a technique used to distribute workloads uniformly across servers or other compute resources to optimize network efficiency, reliability and capacity.
  • look-to-book ratio - The look-to-book ratio is a figure used in the travel industry that shows the percentage of people who visit a travel Web site compared to those who actually make a purchase.
  • microsite - As used in at least one leading Web design book, a microsite is a separately promoted part of a larger Web site.
  • middleware - Middleware is software that is used to bridge the gap between applications and other tools or databases.
  • MIME (Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions) - MIME, or Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions, is an extension of the original email protocol.
  • mobile computing (nomadic computing) - Mobile computing is the use of portable computing devices in conjunction with mobile technology that enables users to access the internet and data on mobile devices anytime, anywhere.
  • mobile Internet device (MID) - The mobile Internet device (MID) is a mini-tablet communications unit aimed at the consumer market and designed to provide entertainment, information and location-based services.
  • Mobile IP - Mobile IP is an Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) standard communications protocol that is designed to allow mobile device users to move from one network to another while maintaining their permanent IP address.
  • Mobile IPv6 (MIPv6 or Mobile Internet Protocol version 6) - Mobile IPv6 (MIPv6) is a protocol developed as a subset of Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) to support mobile connections.
  • mobile payment (m-payment) - Mobile payment is a point-of-sale transaction made through a mobile device.
  • Monster Worldwide - Monster Worldwide is an online recruiting company noted for its flagship Monster.
  • Morphis - Morphis is a Java -based open source wireless transcoding platform from Kargo, Inc.
  • Mozilla - Mozilla was Netscape Communication's nickname for Navigator, its first Web browser, and the name of an open source public collaboration created to develop Navigator.
  • multicast - Multicast is communication between a single sender and multiple receivers on a network.
  • multihomed - Multihomed describes a computer host that has multiple IP addresses to connected networks.
  • Multimedia Messaging Service (MMS) - Multimedia Messaging Service (MMS) - sometimes called Multimedia Messaging System - is a communications technology developed by 3GPP (Third Generation Partnership Project) that allows users to exchange multimedia communications between capable mobile phones and other devices.
  • NBMA (non-broadcast multiple access) - Non-broadcast multiple access (NBMA) is one of four network types in the Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) communications protocol.
  • Netscape - Netscape Communications was a computer services company best known for its Web browser, Navigator.
  • Network Address Translation (NAT) - A Network Address Translation (NAT) is the process of mapping an internet protocol (IP) address to another by changing the header of IP packets while in transit via a router.
  • network service provider (NSP) - A network service provider (NSP) is a company that owns, operates and sells access to internet backbone infrastructure and services.
  • network slicing - Network slicing overlays multiple virtual networks on top of a shared network.
  • network-attached storage (NAS) - Network-attached storage (NAS) is dedicated file storage that enables multiple users and heterogeneous client devices to retrieve data from centralized disk capacity.
  • newsfeed - A news feed (newsfeed) is list of newly published content on a website.
  • Ning - Ning iNing is an web-based social network platform that allows an organization to build customized social websites and interactive virtual communities.
  • nonfungible token (NFT) - A nonfungible token (NFT) is a type of cryptographic asset that is unique and used to create and authenticate ownership of digital assets.
  • OAuth - OAuth (Open Authorization) is an open standard authorization framework for token-based authorization on the internet.
  • org - "org" is one of the generic top-level domain names that can be used when choosing a domain name.
  • Our Favorite Technology Blogs - A comprehensive listing of information technology-related blogs selected by the editors of WhatIs.
  • payment gateway - A payment gateway is a service that authorizes a user’s transfer of funds between financial institutions to sellers without direct delivery of either bank or credit card account information.
  • PEAP (Protected Extensible Authentication Protocol) - PEAP (Protected Extensible Authentication Protocol) is a version of EAP, the authentication protocol used in wireless networks and Point-to-Point connections.
  • peer-to-peer (P2P) - Peer-to-peer (P2P) is a decentralized communications model in which each party has the same capabilities and either party can initiate a communication session.
  • Perl - Perl is a family of script programming languages that is similar in syntax to the C language.
  • persistent identification element (PIE) - Persistent identification element (PIE) is used to tag individual user’s browsers with a unique identifier that – unlike ordinary HTTP cookies -- cannot be easily deleted.
  • personal video recorder (PVR) - A personal video recorder (PVR) is an interactive TV recording device, in essence a sophisticated set-top box with recording capability (although it is not necessarily kept on top of the television set).
  • pharming - Pharming is a scamming practice in which malicious code is installed on a personal computer or server, misdirecting users to fraudulent websites without their knowledge or consent.
  • ping - A ping (Packet Internet or Inter-Network Groper) is a basic internet program that enables a user to test and verify if a particular destination Internet Protocol (IP) address exists and can accept requests in computer network administration.
  • PLATO (Programmed Logic for Automatic Teaching Operations) - PLATO (Programmed Logic for Automatic Teaching Operations), a computer-based training (CBT) network developed in the 1960s, is often credited as the earliest example of a virtual community.
  • point-of-presence (POP) - On the Internet, a point-of-presence (POP) is an access point from one place to the rest of the Internet.
  • Pokémon GO - Pokémon GO is a mobile augmented reality (AR) version of the popular Pokémon video game for iPhone or Android systems.
  • pop-up - A pop-up is a graphical user interface (GUI) display area, usually a small window, that suddenly appears ("pops up") in the foreground of the visual interface.
  • port 80 - On a Web server or Hypertext Transfer Protocol daemon, port 80 is the port that the server "listens to" or expects to receive from a Web client, assuming that the default was taken when the server was configured or set up.
  • port number - Port number is a way to identify a specific process to which an internet or other network message is to be forwarded when it arrives at a server.
  • portal - Portal is a term, generally synonymous with gateway, for a World Wide Web site that is or proposes to be a major starting site for users when they get connected to the Web or that users tend to visit as an anchor site.
  • presence technology - Presence technology is a type of application that makes it possible to locate and identify a computing device wherever it might be, as soon as the user connects to the network.
  • Project Owl - Project Owl is an endeavor by Google to try to reduce the amount of fake news and hate speech from showing in its search results.
  • Q signaling (QSIG) - Q signaling (abbreviated QSIG), a protocol for Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) communications based on the Q.
  • Q.931 - Q.931 (also called Q93 is a signaling protocol for Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) communications that is used in voice over IP (VoIP).
  • quantum internet - The quantum internet is a theoretical system of interconnected quantum computers that uses quantum signals to send information rather than radio waves.
  • Real-time Transport Protocol (RTP) - Real-time Transport Protocol (RTP) is a network standard designed for transmitting audio or video data that is optimized for consistent delivery of live data.
  • Reddit - Reddit is a social news website and forum where content is socially curated and promoted by site members through voting.
  • redirection - On a Web site, redirection is a technique for moving visitors to a different Web page than the one they request, usually because the page requested is unavailable.
  • registered port numbers - The registered port numbers are the port numbers that companies and other users register with the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) for use by the applications that communicate using the Internet's Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) or the User Datagram Protocol (UDP).
  • registration, admission, and status (RAS) - Registration, admission, and status (RAS) is a component of a network protocol that involves the addition of (or refusal to add) new authorized users, the admission of (or refusal to admit) authorized users based on available bandwidth, and the tracking of the status of all users.
  • registry - In the Microsoft Windows operating systems beginning with Windows 95, the registry is a single place for keeping such information as what hardware is attached, what system options have been selected, how computer memory is set up, and what application programs are to be present when the operating system is started.
  • remote desktop - Remote desktop is a program or an operating system feature that allows a user to connect to a computer in another location, see that computer's desktop and interact with it as if it were local.
  • Remote Procedure Call (RPC) - Remote Procedure Call (RPC) is a protocol that one program can use to request a service from a program located in another computer on a network without having to understand the network's details.
  • remote wakeup (RWU) - Remote wakeup (RWU) is a general term for the powering-up of (turning on) a computer over a network.
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