Browse Definitions :

Internet technologies

This WhatIs.com glossary contains terms related to Internet technologies, including definitions about port numbers, standards and protocols and words and phrases about how the Internet works.

SUN - WIN

  • Sun Microsystems - Sun Microsystems (often just called "Sun"), the leading company in computers used as Web servers, also makes servers designed for use as engineering workstations, data storage products, and related software.
  • Sun ONE (Sun Open Net Environment) - Sun ONE (Sun Open Net Environment) is a marketing strategy and set of products from Sun Microsystems aimed at enabling an enterprise to build Web services for its own internal use and for its customers.
  • supercomputer - The first commercially successful supercomputer, the CDC (Control Data Corporation) 6600 was designed by Seymour Cray.
  • supercomputer center - In general, a supercomputer center is a site with a supercomputer that is shared by a number of other sites, usually research sites.
  • superheterodyne - Superheterodyne refers to a method of designing and building wireless communications or broadcast equipment, particularly radio receivers.
  • supernetting or Classless Inter-Domain Routing (CIDR) - Supernetting, also called Classless Inter-Domain Routing (CIDR), is a way to aggregate multiple Internet addresses of the same class.
  • SYN flood (half open attack) - SYN flooding is a method that the user of a hostile client program can use to conduct a denial-of-service (DoS) attack on a computer server.
  • T-carrier system - To see the relationship between T-carrier, E-carrier, and DS0 multiples, see digital signal X.
  • T1 (T-1) - Also see the T-carrier system, of which the T1 is a part.
  • TCP Wrapper - TCP Wrapper is a public domain computer program that provides firewall services for UNIX servers.
  • TCP/IP (Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol) - TCP/IP, or the Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol, is a suite of communication protocols used to interconnect network devices on the internet.
  • TCP/IP offload engine (TOE) - The TCP/IP offload engine (TOE for short) is a technology that is gaining popularity in high-speed Ethernet systems for the purpose of optimizing throughput.
  • third-party cookie - A third-party cookie is one that is placed on a user’s hard disk by a Web site from a domain other than the one a user is visiting.
  • THREAD protocol - The THREAD protocol is a home automation device communication method owned by Nest, a subsidiary of Google.
  • three-phase commit (3PC) - Three-phase commit (3PC) is a protocol that consists of a distributed algorithm used to ensure all transactions in a system are agreed upon and are committed to.
  • time-to-live (TTL) - Time-to-live (TTL) is a value in an Internet Protocol (IP) packet that tells a network router whether or not the packet has been in the network too long and should be discarded.
  • timeline - A timeline is the presentation of a chronological sequence of events along a drawn line that enables a viewer to understand temporal relationships quickly.
  • tModel - A tModel is a data structure representing a service type (a generic representation of a registered service) in the UDDI (Universal Description, Discovery, and Integration) registry.
  • Tomcat - Tomcat is an application server from the Apache Software Foundation that executes Java servlets and renders Web pages that include Java Server Page coding.
  • toothing (Bluetoothing) - Toothing (sometimes called Bluetoothing) is the practice of contacting strangers via a Bluetooth wireless connection to flirt.
  • Top 10 Spyware Threats - Visit our spyware feature page to learn more about this problem and how SMBs can beat it.
  • Top searches of 2008 - What were people searching the WhatIs.
  • top-level domain (TLD) - A top-level domain (TLD) identifies the most general part of the domain name in an Internet address.
  • Topic Map (ISO/IEC Standard 13250:2000) - A Topic Map (ISO/IEC Standard 13250:2000) is an SGML or XML document used for navigation - by people or by machine - within an information set.
  • Topic Map Query Language (TMQL) - Topic Map Query Language (TMQL) is an XML-based extension of Structured Query Language (SQL), a query language developed for use in meeting the specialized data access requirements of Topic Maps (TMs).
  • TP0-TP4 (transport protocols 0 to 4) - TP0-TP4 (transport protocols 0 to 4) are the five protocols in the Transport layer of the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) model for telecommunication.
  • traceroute - Traceroute is a utility that records the route (the specific gateway computers at each hop) through the Internet between your computer and a specified destination computer.
  • TrackBack - TrackBack is a technical specification for an Internet program that allows a blogger to know when another blogger has commented upon one of his posts.
  • transactional e-mail - Transactional e-mail is a type of Web-based marketing in which e-mail recipients can buy goods and services directly from an e-mail message, without being redirected to the retailer's Web site.
  • transient cookie (session cookie) - On the Web, a transient cookie, sometimes called a session cookie, is a small file that contains information about a user that disappears when the user's browser is closed.
  • tree network - In telecommunication networks, a tree network is a combination of two or more star networks connected together.
  • Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) - Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) is an Internet software utility for transferring files that is simpler to use than the File Transfer Protocol (FTP) but less capable.
  • Tumblr - Tumblr is a free microblogging site.
  • TV operating system - A TV operating system (TV OS) is the bootable software in smart TVs and set top boxes that allows a user to control and access to a smart TV’s advanced features and connected devices through a graphical user interface (GUI).
  • Twitch - Twitch (Twitch.
  • typeprint analysis - Typeprint analysis is a technology in which the rhythmic patterns of a person's keyboard behavior, known as keystroke dynamics, are analyzed over a period of time and then stored.
  • UCE (unsolicited commercial email) - UCE (unsolicited commercial e-mail) is a legal term used to describe an electronic promotional message sent to a consumer without the consumer's prior request or consent.
  • UDDI (Universal Description, Discovery, and Integration) - UDDI (Universal Description, Discovery, and Integration) is an XML-based registry for businesses worldwide to list themselves on the Internet.
  • UDP (User Datagram Protocol) - UDP (User Datagram Protocol) is an alternative communications protocol to Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) used primarily for establishing low-latency and loss-tolerating connections between applications on the internet.
  • Universal Business Language (UBL) - Universal Business Language (UBL) is a royalty-free set of documents based on the ebXML (Electronic Business XML) Core Components Technical Specification, also known as ISO 15000-5.
  • Universal Naming Convention (UNC) - In a network, the Universal Naming Convention (UNC) is a way to identify a shared file in a computer without having to specify (or know) the storage device it is on.
  • URI (Uniform Resource Identifier) - A URI (Uniform Resource Identifier) is a sequence of characters that identifies a logical or physical resource on a network.
  • URL (Uniform Resource Locator) - A URL (Uniform Resource Locator) is a unique identifier used to locate a resource on the internet.
  • URL shortener - A URL shortener is a Web site that will create a short Uniform Resource Locator (URL) or Web page address from a long one so that the short version, which is easier to remember and enter, can be used instead.
  • URL-minder - URL-minder is an agent or robot program (bot) that notifies you when a particular Web page has changed.
  • URN (Uniform Resource Name) - A URN (Uniform Resource Name) is an Internet resource with a name that, unlike a URL, has persistent significance - that is, the owner of the URN can expect that someone else (or a program) will always be able to find the resource.
  • usability - Also see human-computer interaction and graphical user interface.
  • Usenet - Usenet is a collection of user-submitted notes or messages on various subjects that are posted to servers on a worldwide network.
  • User Principal Name (UPN) - In the Windows operating system's Active Directory, a User Principal Name (UPN) is the name of a system user in an e-mail address format.
  • user session (visit) - In tabulating statistics for Web site usage, a user session (sometime referred to as a visit) is the presence of a user with a specific IP address who has not visited the site recently (typically, anytime within the past 30 minutes).
  • Ustream - Ustream is an online video service provider that enables anybody with a camera and Internet connection to conduct a live interactive video broadcast to a global audience from anywhere in the world.
  • UTF-16 (16- bit Unicode Transformation Format) - UTF-16 (16- bit Unicode Transformation Format) is a standard method of encoding Unicode character data.
  • UUID (Universal Unique Identifier) - A UUID (Universal Unique Identifier) is a 128-bit number used to uniquely identify some object or entity on the Internet.
  • vertical search engine - A vertical search engine is a search engine that is dedicated to a particular area of focus.
  • video resume - A video resume is a brief account of a job applicant's professional experience, qualifications and interests, submitted to a prospective employer in video form.
  • Vimeo - Vimeo is a U.
  • Vint Cerf (Vinton Gray Cerf) - Vint Cerf (Vinton Gray Cerf) is an American computer scientist best known as an Internet pioneer.
  • virtual classroom - A virtual classroom is an online learning environment.
  • virtual hosting - On the Internet, virtual hosting is the provision of Web server hosting services so that a company (or individual) doesn't have to purchase and maintain its own Web server and connections to the Internet.
  • virtual ISP (virtual Internet service provider, VISP or vISP) - A virtual ISP (virtual Internet service provider, sometimes abbreviated as VISP or vISP) is a company that offers Internet services under its own company or brand name, while actually using the equipment and facilities of another ISP to provide those services.
  • virtual meeting room - A virtual meeting room is a cloud-based collaboration space that allows people in disparate geographical locations to meet in real time.
  • Visual J - Visual J# (sometimes known as just J#) is a set of programmming tools that allow developers to use the Java programming language to write applications that will run on Microsoft's .
  • Visual Studio .NET - Visual Studio .
  • VoIP phone - A VoIP phone is a hardware- or software-based telephone designed to use voice over IP (VoIP) technology to send and receive phone calls over an IP network.
  • VoIP trunk gateway - A VoIP trunk gateway is an interface that facilitates the use of plain old telephone service (POTS) equipment, such as conventional phone sets and fax machines, with a voice over IP (VoIP) network.
  • VRRP (Virtual Router Redundancy Protocol) - VRRP (Virtual Router Redundancy Protocol) is an Internet protocol that provides a way to have one or more backup routers when using a statically configured router on a local area network (LAN).
  • wallet - A wallet is a small software program used for online purchase transactions.
  • WAN (Wide Area Network) - A wide area network (WAN) is a geographically distributed telecommunications network that interconnects multiple local area networks (LANs).
  • Wayback Machine - The Wayback Machine is a Web site that enables anyone to see what a particular Web site looked like at some time in the past - from 1996 to the present.
  • Web 2.0 - Web 2.0 are websites and applications that make use of user-generated content for end-users.
  • Web analytics - Web analytics is the process of analyzing the behavior of visitors to a Web site.
  • Web filter - A Web filter is a program that can screen an incoming Web page to determine whether some or all of it should not be displayed to the user.
  • Web hosting (Webhosting, Web site hosting, and hosting) - Web hosting (also known as Webhosting, Web site hosting, and hosting) is the business of housing, serving, and maintaining files for one or more Web site.
  • Web Intermediaries (WBI) - Web Intermediaries (WBI - pronounced "webby") is a framework and set of programming tools from IBM for the uniform creation and control of intermediary programs such as proxy servers, transcoding processors, and any kind of program that sits somewhere between two end points in a network.
  • Web presence - A Web presence (or Web site) is a collection of Web files on a particular subject that includes a beginning file called a home page.
  • Web Proxy Autodiscovery (WPAD) - Web Proxy Autodiscovery (WPAD) is a proposed Internet protocol that allows a client, such as a Web browser or a streaming media application, to automatically locate and interface with cache services in a network so that information can be delivered more quickly to the user.
  • Web server - A Web server is a program that uses the client/server model and the Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) to serve the files that form Web pages to users, whose computers contain HTTP clients that forward their requests.
  • Web services - Web services are a type of internet software that use standardized messaging protocols and are made available from an application service provider’s web server for use by a client or other web-based programs.
  • Web Services Description Language (WSDL) - The Web Services Description Language (WSDL) is an XML-based language used to describe the services a business offers and to provide a way for individuals and other businesses to access those services electronically.
  • Web site - This definition is also listed under presence, site and Website.
  • Web site hosting - See the more comprehensive definition of Hosting.
  • Web year - A Web year is the length of time it takes for Internet technology to evolve as much as technology in another environment might evolve in a calendar year.
  • Web-Based Enterprise Management (WBEM) - Web-Based Enterprise Management (WBEM) is a set of industry standards that an enterprise can use to manage its information operations in the distributed computing environment of the Internet.
  • Web-Braille - Web-Braille is a delivery system that allows content to be read on a Braille display or transmitted to a Braille embosser.
  • WebNFS - WebNFS is a product and proposed standard protocol from Sun Microsystems that extends its Network File System (NFS) to the Internet.
  • webOS - WebOS is an LG-owned, Linux based, smart TV operating system that is set up to allow control and access of LG Smart TV’s more advanced features and connected devices through a graphical user interface (GUI).
  • WebRTC (Web Real-Time Communications) - Web Real-Time Communications (WebRTC) is an open source project that is expected to make video communication more user-friendly by embedding voice, text and video communications capabilities in Web browsers.
  • Weebly - Weebly is a freemium website creation and Web-hosting service.
  • weighted fair queueing (WFQ) - Weighted fair queueing (WFQ) is a method of automatically smoothing out the flow of data in packet-switched communication networks by sorting packets to minimize the average latency and prevent exaggerated discrepancies between the transmission efficiency afforded to narrowband versus broadband signals.
  • white space device (WSD) - A white space device is an FCC-certified wireless device that can be used without an exclusive broadcast license in the RF spectrum below 700 MHz: underutilized, unlicensed portions of the spectrum called white space.
  • whiteboard - A whiteboard is a non-electronic variation of the traditional "rewriteable" schoolroom blackboard, but is white instead of black and of a material that can be written on with colored markers (known as dry erase markers).
  • whitelist - A whitelist is a list of e-mail addresses or domain names from which an e-mail blocking program will allow messages to be received.
  • whois - whois is a program that will tell you the owner of any second-level domain name who has registered it with Verisign (or with Network Solutions, which was acquired by Verisign).
  • wide-area file services (WAFS) - Wide-area file services (WAFS) is a storage technology that makes it possible to access a remote data center as though it were local.
  • wiki - A wiki (sometimes spelled "Wiki") is a server program that allows users to collaborate in forming the content of a Web site.
  • Windows Internet Naming Service (WINS) - Windows Internet Naming Service (WINS), part of the Microsoft Windows NT and 2000 Servers, manages the association of workstation names and locations with Internet Protocol addresses (IP addresses) without the user or an administrator having to be involved in each configuration change.
  • Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI) - Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI) is a set of specifications from Microsoft for consolidating the management of devices and applications in a network from Windows computing systems.
  • Winsock - Winsock is a programming interface and the supporting program that handles input/output requests for Internet applications in a Windows operating system.
  • Winsock 2 - Like Winsock, Winsock 2 is a programming interface and the supporting program that handles input/output requests for Internet applications in a Windows operating system.

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