Browse Definitions :

Linux

Definitions related to Linux, including tech terms about open source and words and phrases about Linux distributions and software development.

ADA - SQU

  • Adaptive Server Enterprise (ASE) - Adaptive Server Enterprise (ASE) is a relational database management system (RDBMS) from Sybase, Inc.
  • Alpine Linux - Alpine Linux is a small, security-oriented, lightweight Linux distribution based on the musl libc library and BusyBox utilities platform instead of GNU.
  • Apache - Apache is a freely available Web server that is distributed under an "open source" license.
  • bash (Bourne Again Shell) - Bash (Bourne Again Shell ) is the free version of the Bourne shell distributed with Linux and GNU operating systems.
  • bogomips - Bogomips is a measurement provided in the Linux operating system that indicates in a relative way how fast the computer processor runs.
  • Boot2Docker - Boot2Docker is a minimalist Linux distribution with the sole purpose to run Docker containers.
  • Clonezilla - Clonezilla is a free open source disk cloning application based on Debian.
  • Compiere - Compiere is a popular open-source system of software applications that provide enterprise resource planning (ERP), customer relationship management (CRM), supply chain management (SCM), tax accounting, and general accounting for the small and medium-size enterprise.
  • Concurrent Versions System (CVS) - CVS also is an abbreviation for Computer Vision Syndrome.
  • Container Linux by CoreOS - Container Linux by CoreOS, originally named CoreOS Linux, is an open source operating system (OS) that provides the functionality required to deploy and manage applications within containers.
  • copyleft - Copyleft is the idea and the specific stipulation when distributing software that the user will be able to copy it freely, examine and modify the source code, and redistribute the software to others (free or priced) as long as the redistributed software is also passed along with the copyleft stipulation.
  • Cygwin - Cygwin is an open source collection of tools that allows Unix or Linux applications to be compiled and run on a Windows operating system from within a Linux-like interface.
  • Daylight Saving Time patch - A Daylight Saving Time patch is a modular piece of code created to update systems, devices and programs for compatibility with new start and end dates for Daylight Saving Time (DST) in the United States, Canada and Bermuda.
  • Debian - Debian is a popular and freely-available computer operating system that uses the Linux kernel and other program components obtained from the GNU project.
  • Docker - Docker is an open source software platform to create, deploy and manage virtualized application containers on a common operating system (OS), with an ecosystem of allied tools.
  • DRBD (Distributed Replicated Block Device) - DRBD (Distributed Replicated Block Device) is a Linux-based software component that facilitates the replacement of shared storage systems by networked mirroring.
  • Eggdrop - Eggdrop is an Internet Relay Chat (IRC) program for Linux or UNIX users that sits in the background of an IRC?channel to manage and protect a chat.
  • Enlightenment (E) - Enlightenment, also called E, is a popular free and open source (FOSS) windows manager that can serve as a standalone desktop environment.
  • Fedora - Fedora is a popular open source Linux-based operating system.
  • Firefox OS - Firefox OS is a Linux-based mobile operating system designed for smartphones, tablets and smart TVs.
  • Firestarter - Firestarter is an open source firewall program for personal computers and servers that support Linux kernels 2.
  • Flex - Flex is an open source program designed to automatically and quickly generate scanners, also known as tokenizers, which recognize lexical patterns in text.
  • Free and open source software (FOSS) or free/libre open source software (FLOSS) - Free and open source software (FOSS), also known as free/libre open source software (FLOSS) and free/open source software (F/OSS), is software developed by informal collaborative networks of programmers and end users.
  • free software - Free software is software that can be freely used, modified, and redistributed with only one restriction: any redistributed version of the software must be distributed with the original terms of free use, modification, and distribution (known as copyleft).
  • Free Software Foundation (FSF) - The Free Software Foundation (FSF) was founded in 1983 along with its demonstration GNU project.
  • GIMP (GNU Image Manipulation Program) - GIMP (GNU Image Manipulation Program) is a freely available open source application for creating and manipulating graphic images that runs on Linux, other Unix-based operating systems, and also on Windows and Mac OS X.
  • GitHub - GitHub is a web-based revision control hosting service for software development and code sharing.
  • GNU GRUB - GNU GRUB (or just GRUB) is a boot loader package that supports multiple operating systems on a computer.
  • GNU Linux - The GNU Linux project was created for the development of a Unix-like operating system that comes with source code that can be copied, modified, and redistributed.
  • GNU Network Object Model Environment (GNOME) - GNOME (GNU Network Object Model Environment, pronounced gah-NOHM) is a graphical user interface (graphical user interface) and set of computer desktop application for users of any UNIX-based operating system.
  • Gnutella - Gnutella is a system in which individuals can exchange files over the Internet directly without going through a Web site in an arrangement sometimes described as peer-to-peer (here meaning "person-to-person").
  • Goobuntu - Goobuntu (Google Ubuntu) is the operating system (OS) that Google uses for its employee computer desktop workstations.
  • gOS (good operating system) - gOS (pronounced gee-oss) is a Linux distribution designed for use with Web-based applications rather than software that must be purchased and installed.
  • gzip (GNU zip) - Gzip (GNU zip) is a free and open source algorithm for file compression.
  • Hardy Heron (Ubuntu 8.04 LTS Server Edition) - Hardy Heron is the code name for version 8.
  • Host OS (host operating system) - A host OS is the software installed on a computer that interacts with the underlying hardware in a computer using virtualization technology.
  • IBM Integrated Facility for Linux (IFL) - The Integrated Facility for Linux (IFL) is a specialty engine processor on IBM System z mainframe servers that is dedicated to Linux workloads.
  • IBM Watson supercomputer - Watson is an IBM supercomputer that combines artificial intelligence (AI) and sophisticated analytical software for optimal performance as a 'question answering' machine.
  • Information Kit: Linux, Unix, and All the Little ixes - Linux, Unix, and all the little ixes --The Unix versus Linux confusion.
  • Ingres - Ingres is a relational database management system (RDBMS) that evolved from a research project at the University of California at Berkeley in the 1970s.
  • Installfest - An Installfest is a special occasion when computer users get together to help each other install new programming, usually the Linux operating system and related programs, often together with experts and the resources to download programming from the Internet.
  • iptables - Iptables is a generic table structure that defines rules and commands as part of the netfilter framework that facilitates Network Address Translation (NAT), packet filtering, and packet mangling in the Linux 2.
  • Jabber - Jabber is an initiative to produce an open source, XML-based instant messaging platform.
  • JeOS (just enough operating system) - JeOS (just enough operating system) is a highly customized operating system built for a specific application.
  • K Desktop Environment (KDE) - K Desktop Environment (KDE) is an Open Source graphical desktop environment for UNIX workstations.
  • kernel panic - A kernel panic is a computer error from which the operating system (OS) cannot quickly or easily recover.
  • kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVM) - Kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVM) is a free, open source virtualization architecture for Linux distributions.
  • KSM (kernel samepage merging) - KSM (kernel samepage merging) is a Linux kernel feature that allows the KVM hypervisor to share identical memory pages among different process or virtual machines on the same server.
  • Kubernetes - Kubernetes, also referred to as K8s, is an open source system used to manage Linux Containers across private, public and hybrid cloud environments.
  • Kubernetes Operators - A Kubernetes Operator is a method for application deployment that extends the capabilities of Kubernetes to manage more complex, stateful workloads.
  • Kubernetes Pod - Kubernetes Pods are the smallest deployable computing units in the open source Kubernetes container scheduling and orchestration environment.
  • Kubernetes scheduler - Kubernetes scheduler is a part of the open source Kubernetes container orchestration platform that controls performance, capacity and availability through policies and topology awareness.
  • Linspire (Lindows) - Linspire, formerly known as Lindows, is a low-cost commercial Linux-based operating system with a user interface similar to the latest Microsoft Windows operating system.
  • Linus Torvalds - Linus Torvalds, the creator of the Linux kernel, was born in Helsinki, Finland, on December 28, 1969.
  • Linux distros (Linux distribution) - A Linux distribution -- often shortened to "Linux distro" -- is a version of the open source Linux operating system that is packaged with other components, such as an installation programs, management tools and additional software such as the KVM hypervisor.
  • Linux Foundation - The Linux Foundation is a consortium dedicated to fostering the growth of Linux, an open source alternative to the Unix operating system.
  • Linux freeware and shareware guide - Here you'll find a number of useful tools that can be used as is or customized to create your own tools.
  • Linux kernel panic - Linux kernel panic occurs when the operating system discovers a potentially fatal error that affects the Linux kernel.
  • Linux Standard Base (LSB) - The Linux Standard Base (LSB), also called the LSB project, is an ongoing effort to standardize the structure of Linux and related operating systems, with the intention of increasing compatibility among systems that use different versions (also known as distributions or flavors) of Unix.
  • Linux stream - A Linux stream is information traveling in a Linux shell from one process to another via a pipe, or from one file to another via a redirect.
  • LinuxONE - LinuxONE is a mainframe series that runs on Linux created by IBM as a way of competing with cloud computing solutions.
  • LXD (Linux container hypervisor) - LXD is an open source container management extension for Linux Containers (LXC).
  • man page - A man page in a Linux or other Unix-based operating system is an online description of an interactive shell command or other system interface or object.
  • mobile Internet device (MID) - The mobile Internet device (MID) is a mini-tablet communications unit aimed at the consumer market and designed to provide entertainment, information and location-based services.
  • Moblin - Moblin is a Linux-based platform that is optimized for small computing devices.
  • netfilter - Netfilter is a utility in Linux 2.
  • netstat - Netstat is a common command line TCP/IP networking utility available in most versions of Windows, Linux, UNIX and other operating systems.
  • Open Container Initiative - The Open Container Initiative, formerly known as the Open Container Project, is a Linux Foundation project designed to establish common open standards for container platforms.
  • Open Network Automation Platform - The Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) is a networking project that provides a digital environment for the orchestration and automation of complex network services.
  • Open Source Development Labs (OSDL) - Open Source Development Labs (OSDL) is a nonprofit corporation founded by IBM, Intel, and Computer Associates to support Linux developers and users.
  • open system - In a computing context, an open system is an open source operating system, typically composed of coordinated modular components from a number of sources and not reliant upon any proprietary elements.
  • operating system (OS) - An operating system (OS) is the program that, after being initially loaded into the computer by a boot program, manages all of the other application programs in a computer.
  • package manager or package management system (PMS) - A package manager, also known as a package management system (PMS), is a program used to install, uninstall and manage software packages.
  • Peppermint - Peppermint is a lightweight open source operating system that is optimized for cloud computing and Web-based applications.
  • Personal Home Page (PHP) - In Web programming, Personal Home Page (PHP) is a script language and interpreter, similar to JavaScript and Microsoft's VBScript, that is freely available and used primarily on Linux Web servers.
  • principle of least privilege (POLP) - The principle of least privilege (POLP), an important concept in computer security, is the practice of limiting access rights for users to the bare minimum permissions they need to perform their work.
  • Puppet (Puppet Labs) - Puppet is an open source systems management tool for centralizing and automating configuration management.
  • Puppy Linux - Puppy Linux is a compact version of Linux, an operating system (OS) that provides computer users with a free or low-cost alternative to Unix.
  • Quagga - Quagga is an open source suite of applications for the management of routing protocols.
  • Quiz: March of the Penguin (Linuxworld Boston, 2006) - Last year was a big year for penguins, from their appearance in Oscar-winning documentaries to wholesale adoption of Linux by South America's largest economy.
  • Red Hat - Red Hat is a leading software company in the business of assembling open source components for the Linux operating system and related programs into a distribution package that can easily be ordered and implemented.
  • Red Hat Atomic Host - Red Hat Atomic Host is a variant of the Red Hat Enterprise Linux supported, open source operating system, designed to be a minimal OS with optimizations for container hosting.
  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) - Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) is a distribution of the Linux operating system developed for the business market.
  • remote desktop - Remote desktop is a program or an operating system feature that allows a user to connect to a computer in another location, see that computer's desktop and interact with it as if it were local.
  • remote desktop protocol (RDP) - Remote desktop protocol (RDP) is a secure network communications protocol designed for remote management, as well as for remote access to virtual desktops, applications and an RDP terminal server.
  • rsync - Rsync is a free software utility for Unix- and Linux-like systems that copies files and directories from one host to another.
  • runlevel - A runlevel is a Linux operating state that determines which programs can execute when the operating system restarts.
  • Secure Shell Charter (SSH Charter) - The Secure Shell Charter (SSH Charter) is a set of papers produced by the Secure Shell Working Group (SSH Working Group), an organization dedicated to updating and standardizing the popular Unix-based interface and protocol known as Secure Shell (SSH or secsh).
  • SELinux (Security-Enhanced Linux) - SELinux, or Security-Enhanced Linux, is a part of the Linux security kernel that acts as a protective agent on servers.
  • shadow password file - In the Linux operating system, a shadow password file is a system file in which encryption user password are stored so that they aren't available to people who try to break into the system.
  • Shellshock - Shellshock is the common name for a coding vulnerability found in the Bash shell user interface that affects Unix-based operating systems, including Linux and Mac OS X, and allows attackers to remotely gain complete control of a system.
  • skinny Linux (Austrumi, Puppy Linux Damn Small Linux and Feather Linux) - Skinny Linux is an umbrella term that encompasses any compact version of the Linux operating system, such as Austrumi, Puppy Linux Damn Small Linux and Feather Linux.
  • Slackware - Slackware is the earliest distribution of the Linux operating system that is still being developed.
  • Slashdot - Slashdot is a socially curated website dedicated to technology-related news items.
  • Slashdot Effect - The Slashdot Effect is the sudden, relatively temporary surge in traffic to a Web site that occurs when a high-traffic Web site or other source posts a story that refers visitors to another Web site.
  • Squid proxy server - Squid is a Unix-based proxy server that caches Internet content closer to a requestor than its original point of origin.

-ADS BY GOOGLE

SearchCompliance

  • risk management

    Risk management is the process of identifying, assessing and controlling threats to an organization's capital and earnings.

  • compliance as a service (CaaS)

    Compliance as a Service (CaaS) is a cloud service service level agreement (SLA) that specified how a managed service provider (...

  • data protection impact assessment (DPIA)

    A data protection impact assessment (DPIA) is a process designed to help organizations determine how data processing systems, ...

SearchSecurity

  • Port Scan

    A port scan is a series of messages sent by someone attempting to break into a computer to learn which computer network services ...

  • DMZ (networking)

    In computer networks, a DMZ (demilitarized zone), also sometimes known as a perimeter network or a screened subnetwork, is a ...

  • quantum supremacy

    Quantum supremacy is the experimental demonstration of a quantum computer's dominance and advantage over classic computers by ...

SearchHealthIT

SearchDisasterRecovery

  • business continuity plan (BCP)

    A business continuity plan (BCP) is a document that consists of the critical information an organization needs to continue ...

  • disaster recovery team

    A disaster recovery team is a group of individuals focused on planning, implementing, maintaining, auditing and testing an ...

  • cloud insurance

    Cloud insurance is any type of financial or data protection obtained by a cloud service provider. 

SearchStorage

Close