Browse Definitions :

Microprocessors

Terms related to microprocessors, including definitions about silicon chips and words and phrases about computer processors.

3-D - JAM

  • 3-D chip (3D chip) - A 3-D chip is an integrated circuit (IC) containing a three-dimensional array of interconnected devices performing digital, analog, image processing and neural-network functions, either individually or in combination.
  • 64-bit processor - A 64-bit processor is a microprocessor with a word size of 64 bits, a requirement for memory and data intensive applications such as computer-aided design (CAD) applications, database management systems, technical and scientific applications, and high-performance servers.
  • Accelerated Hub Architecture (AHA) (or Intel Hub Architecture) - Accelerated Hub Architecture (AHA) (also called Intel Hub Architecture) is an Intel 800-series chipset design that uses a dedicated bus to transfer data between the two main processor chips instead of using the Peripheral Component Interconnect (PCI) bus, which was used in previous chipset architectures.
  • acceleration hardware - Acceleration hardware is a general term that refers to devices that speed up data communications, storage and retrieval, encryption and decryption, mathematical operations, graphics, and Web page viewing.
  • AI accelerator - An AI accelerator is a microchip designed specifically to enable faster processing of artificial intelligence (AI) tasks.
  • Alpha - Alpha is both a microprocessor and the name of a computer system from the Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC), which is now part of Compaq.
  • AMD (Advanced Micro Devices) - AMD is the second largest maker of personal computer microprocessors after Intel.
  • AMD-V (AMD virtualization) - AMD-V (AMD virtualization) is a set of hardware extensions for the X86 processor architecture.
  • arithmetic-logic unit (ALU) - An arithmetic-logic unit (ALU) is the part of a computer processor (CPU) that carries out arithmetic and logic operations on the operands in computer instruction words.
  • ARM processor - An ARM processor is any of several 32-bit RISC (reduced instruction set computer) microprocessors developed by Advanced RISC Machines, Ltd.
  • ASIC (application-specific integrated circuit) - An ASIC (application-specific integrated circuit) is a microchip designed for a special application, such as a particular kind of transmission protocol or a hand-held computer.
  • ASSP (application-specific standard product) - In computers, an ASSP (application-specific standard product) is a semiconductor device integrated circuit (IC) product that is dedicated to a specific application market and sold to more than one user (and thus, "standard").
  • back-pressure sensor - A back-pressure sensor is a transducer that detects and measures the instantaneous torque that a robot motor applies.
  • backside bus - In a personal computer with an Intel processor chipset that includes a Dual Independent Bus (DIB), the frontside bus is the data path and physical interface between the processor and the main memory (RAM).
  • biochip - A biochip is a collection of miniaturized test sites (microarrays) arranged on a solid substrate that permits many tests to be performed at the same time in order to achieve higher throughput and speed.
  • biomimetics (biomimicry) - Biomimetic refers to human-made processes, substances, devices, or systems that imitate nature.
  • BIOS (basic input/output system) - BIOS (basic input/output system) is the program a personal computer's microprocessor uses to get the computer system started after you turn it on.
  • bipolar transistor - A bipolar transistor is a semiconductor device commonly used for amplification.
  • bit slicing - Bit slicing is a method of combining processor modules to multiply the word length.
  • blade server - A blade server, sometimes referred to as a high-density server, is a compact device containing a computer used to manage and distribute data in a collection of computers and systems, called a network.
  • Blue Gene - Blue Gene is a supercomputer development project at IBM for a series of high-performance system-on-a-chip (SoC) arcitectures with minimal power demands.
  • brick server - A brick server is a compact computer server module without a chassis that can come in various processor, RAM, I/O, and storage configurations and is designed to fit into rack locations similar to those for blade servers.
  • brownout reset - A brownout reset is a circuit that causes a computer processor to reset (or reboot) in the event of a brownout, which is a significant drop in the power supply output voltage.
  • buckypaper - Buckypaper is a strong and lightweight substance manufactured from compressed carbon nanotubes, which are long, cylindrical carbon structures consisting of hexagonal graphite molecules attached at the edges.
  • cache memory - Cache memory, also called CPU memory, is high-speed static random access memory (SRAM) that a computer microprocessor can access more quickly than it can access regular random access memory (RAM).
  • carbon nanotube computer - A carbon nanotube computer is one with a processor that uses carbon nanotubes as its semiconductor material.
  • Celeron - Celeron is the low-end (and low cost) member of the family of microprocessors from Intel that is based on its P6 architecture.
  • Cell processor (CELL) - The Cell processor (also called CELL) is a microprocessor chip with a multi-core, parallel processing architecture and floating-point design.
  • Centrino - Centrino is a technology package from Intel that provides built-in wireless support for laptop computers while making it possible to run a laptop all day (up to seven hours) without a battery recharge.
  • chip - "Chip" is short for microchip, the incredibly complex yet tiny modules that store computer memory or provide logic circuitry for microprocessors.
  • chipset - A chipset is a group of integrated circuits (microchips) that can be used together to serve a single function and are therefore manufactured and sold as a unit.
  • CISC (complex instruction set computer or computing) - The term "CISC" (complex instruction set computer or computing) refers to computers designed with a full set of computer instructions that were intended to provide needed capabilities in the most efficient way.
  • clock cycle - In a computer, the clock cycle is the time between two adjacent pulses of the oscillator that sets the tempo of the computer processor.
  • clock gating - Clock gating is the power-saving feature in semiconductor microelectronics that enables switching off circuits.
  • clock speed - In a computer, clock speed refers to the number of pulses per second generated by an oscillator that sets the tempo for the processor.
  • CMOS (complementary metal-oxide semiconductor) - CMOS (complementary metal-oxide semiconductor) is the semiconductor technology used in the transistors that are manufactured into most of today's computer microchips.
  • combinatorial logic - Combinatorial logic is a concept in which two or more input states define one or more output states, where the resulting state or states are related by defined rules that are independent of previous states.
  • context switch - A context switch is a procedure that a computer's CPU (central processing unit) follows to change from one task (or process) to another while ensuring that the tasks do not conflict.
  • coprocessor - A coprocessor is a special set of circuits in a microprocessor chip that is designed to manipulate numbers or perform some other specialized function more quickly than the basic microprocessor circuits could perform the same task.
  • crossbar latch - A crossbar latch, also called a molecular crossbar latch, is a nanoscale device with properties similar to those of a conventional silicon transistor, but physically much smaller, having a diameter of approximately 2 nanometers (nm, where 1 nm = 10-9 m).
  • Crusoe - Crusoe is a family of "smart" microprocessors from Transmeta that combines a relatively simple, low-powered hardware processor with software that makes the hardware processor look like an x86 Intel processor (such as a Pentium III).
  • Cyrix - Cyrix (pronounced SYE-rihks) was a line of low-cost microprocessors intended for personal computers and information appliances that competed, along with AMD and Intel, for the low-cost microprocessor market.
  • demand-based switching (DBS) - Demand-based switching (DBS) is a power-management technology developed by Intel in which the applied voltage and clock speed for a microprocessor are kept to the minimum necessary to allow optimum performance of required operations.
  • dendrimer - A dendrimer (from Greek dendra for tree) is an artificially manufactured or synthesized molecule built up from branched units called monomers.
  • digital hearing aid - A digital hearing aid is a hearing aid device that receives sound and digitizes it (breaks sound waves up into very small, discrete units) prior to amplification.
  • disposable computer - A disposable computer is a small data processing device with input/output, memory, and communication capabilities; the device is intended to be used for a limited time period or number of uses and then discarded.
  • Drizzle - Drizzle is a lightweight open source database management system in development based on MySQL 6.
  • embedded device - An embedded device is an object that contains a special-purpose computing system.
  • end effector - In robotics, an end effector is a device or tool that's connected to the end of a robot arm where the hand would be.
  • entangled light-emitting diode (ELED) - An entangled LED is a light-emitting diode containing a quantum dot that enables the production of entangled photons (light particles) on demand.
  • EPIC (Explicitly Parallel Instruction Computing) - (EPIC also stand for Electronic Privacy Information Center.
  • explicit parallelism - Explicit parallelism is a concept of processor-compiler efficiency in which a group of instructions is sent from the compiler to the processor for simultaneous rather than sequential execution.
  • exponential assembly - In nanotechnology, exponential assembly is a form of self-replication in which tiny devices called nanorobots repeatedly construct copies of themselves.
  • extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) - Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) is an advanced technology for making microprocessors a hundred times more powerful than those made today.
  • eye-in-hand system - An eye-in-hand system is a robot end effector equipped with a close-range camera.
  • fan-in - Fan-in is a term that defines the maximum number of digital inputs that a single logic gate can accept.
  • fan-out - Fan-out is a term that defines the maximum number of digital inputs that the output of a single logic gate can feed.
  • FC-PGA (flip chip-pin grid array) - FC-PGA (flip chip-pin grid array) is a microchip design developed by Intel for its faster microprocessors in which the hottest part of the chip is located on the side that is away from the motherboard.
  • FeliCa - .
  • field-programmable gate array (FPGA) - A field-programmable gate array (FPGA) is an integrated circuit (IC) that can be programmed in the field after manufacture.
  • FIFO (first-in, first-out) - In computer programming, FIFO (first-in, first-out) is an approach to handling program work requests from queues or stacks so that the oldest request is handled next.
  • floating point unit (FPU) - A floating point unit (FPU), also known as a math coprocessor or numeric coprocessor, is a specialized coprocessor that manipulates numbers more quickly than the basic microprocessor circuitry.
  • FLOPS (floating-point operations per second) - In computers, FLOPS are floating-point operations per second.
  • frontside bus (FSB) - See also: backside busIn a personal computer with an Intel processor chipset that includes a Dual Independent Bus (DIB), the frontside bus is the data path and physical interface between the processor and the main memory (RAM).
  • fullerene - A fullerene is a pure carbon molecule composed of at least 60 atoms of carbon.
  • gallium arsenide field-effect transistor (GaAsFET) - A gallium arsenide field-effect transistor (GaAsFET) is a specialized type of field-effect transistor (FET) that is used in amplifier circuits at very-high, ultra-high, and microwave radio frequencies.
  • glassfet - Glassfet is jargon for vacuum tube.
  • glue logic - Glue logic is a special form of digital circuitry that allows different types of logic chips or circuits to work together by acting as an interface between them.
  • graph theory - Graph theory is the study of points and lines.
  • graphene - Graphene is a highly conductive allotrope of carbon whose atoms are arranged in a mesh- like form a single atom thick.
  • graphene transistor - A graphene transistor is a nanoscale device based on graphene, a component of graphite with electronic properties far superior to those of silicon.
  • Haswell - Haswell is the code name for Intel's 4th generation Core i-based processors.
  • heatsink - A heatsink is a device that is attached to a microprocessor chip to keep it from overheating by absorbing its heat and dissipating it into the air.
  • HiP7 and HiP8 - HiP7 and HiP8 are abbreviations for two versions of HiPerMOS, a complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) microchip technology invented by Motorola.
  • holographic processing unit (HPU) - Holographic processing unit (HPU) is what Microsoft has named the coprocessor in its HoloLens virtual reality (VR) headset.
  • HP 9000 - The HP 9000 is a line of UNIX-based business servers from Hewlett-Packard (HP) with server models that span enterprise applications from the "entry-level" (branch or department-level computers, Web hosting servers, and so forth) through the midrange with needs for handling advanced enterprise resource planning (ERP) and analytical customer resource management (CRM) up to its high-end servers for very computing-intensive applications.
  • HP e3000 - The HP e3000 is a line of midrange business servers that carries on the well-known series of 3000 computers from Hewlett-Packard (HP).
  • Hyper-Threading - Hyper-Threading is a technology used by some Intel microprocessors that allows a single microprocessor to act like two separate processors to the operating system and the application programs that use it.
  • HyperTransport - HyperTransport is a high-speed, point-to-point, 32-bit technology for data transfer within the integrated circuits (IC s) in computers and other devices.
  • I2C bus (Inter-IC bus) - The I2C (Inter-IC) bus is a bi-directional two-wire serial bus that provides a communication link between integrated circuits (ICs).
  • I2S (SQUID) - I2S (Inter-IC Sound) is a serial bus (path) design for digital audio devices and technologies such as compact disc (CD) players, digital sound processors, and digital TV (DTV) sound.
  • IA-64 - IA-64 is a 64-bit processor architecture developed at Intel that is based on Explicitly Parallel Instruction Computing (EPIC) and designed as the foundation for Intel's line of microprocessors through 2005.
  • IBM Roadrunner - Roadrunner is the fastest supercomputer in the world, twice as fast as Blue Gene and six times as fast as any of the other current supercomputers.
  • iButton - An iButton is a microchip similar to those used in a smart card but housed in a round stainless steel button of 17.
  • Ice Lake - Ice Lake is a coming Intel central processing unit (CPU) product generation that is expected to be on the long awaited 10nm process.
  • index register - An index register is a circuit that receives, stores, and outputs instruction-changing codes in a computer.
  • Intel - Intel is the world’s largest manufacturer of PC microprocessors and the holder of the x86 processor architecture patent.
  • Intel 4004 - The Intel 4004 was one of the first microprocessors ever produced, released in 1971.
  • Intel 80386 - Intel 80386 also known as (386 and i386) is the third-generation Intel x86 microprocessor introduced in October 1985.
  • Intel 80486 - Intel 80486, also known as i486 or just 486, is the fourth-generation generation Intel x86 microprocessor.
  • Intel 8086 - The Intel 8086 was Intel’s first x86 processor.
  • Intel Bay Trail - Intel Bay Trail is the code name for a line of Atom processors manufactured by Intel Corp.
  • Intel Curie - Intel’s Curie module is a tiny system-on a-chip (SoC) based on the Intel Quark SE.
  • Intel Quark - Intel Quark is an embedded system-on-a-chip (SoC) processor design intended for smaller mobile devices like wearable computers.
  • Intel Xeon D-2100 - The Intel Xeon D-2100 processor is a system on a chip (SoC) designed with low power requirements for computing data at the device-level of Internet of Things (IoT) and smart devices.
  • IP core (intellectual property core) - An IP (intellectual property) core is a block of logic or data that is used in making a field programmable gate array (FPGA) or application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) for a product.
  • IRQ (interrupt request) - An IRQ (interrupt request) value is an assigned location where the computer can expect a particular device to interrupt it when the device sends the computer signals about its operation.
  • Itanium - Itanium is Intel's first microprocessor that is based on the 64-bit architecture known as IA-64.
  • Ivy Bridge - Ivy Bridge is the code name for Intel's third generation of Core processors.
  • jam sync - In audio (sound) production, jam sync is a mode of device synchronization using SMPTE time code in which a slave device can furnish its own timing during the time that a master device is temporarily unstable.

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