Browse Definitions :

Multimedia and graphics

Terms related to multimedia, including graphics, animation and video definitions and words and phrases about images and sound.

UNC - ZV

  • uncanny valley - The uncanny valley is a common unsettling feeling people experience where androids (humanoid robots) and audio/visual simulations closely resemble humans in many respects but are not quite realistic.
  • unified communications (UC) - Unified communications (UC) is a conceptual and technological framework for integrating various enterprise communication methods -- telephony, presence, voicemail, video calling and conferencing, email, instant messaging, etc.
  • Universal Disk Format (UDF) - Universal Disk Format (UDF) is a CD-ROM and DVD file system standard developed as a means of ensuring consistency among data written to various optical media, by facilitating both data interchange and the implementation of the ISO/IEC 13346 standard.
  • UXGA (Ultra Extended Graphics Array) - UXGA (Ultra Extended Graphics Array) is a display modein which the resolutionis 1600 pixels horizontally by 1200 pixels vertically (1600 x 1200).
  • VCR (videocassette recorder) - A VCR (videocassette recorder) is an electromechanical device for recording and playing back full-motion audio-visual programming on cassettes containing magnetic tape.
  • vector - A vector is a quantity or phenomenon that has two independent properties: magnitude and direction.
  • vector graphics - Vector graphics is the creation of digital images through a sequence of commands or mathematical statements that place lines and shapes in a given two-dimensional or three-dimensional space.
  • vector graphics rendering (VML) - Vector graphics rendering, sometimes abbreviated VML, refers to scalable vector graphics (SVG) used in Web pages.
  • vertical interval time code (VITC) - Vertical interval time code (abbreviated VITC and sometimes pronounced VIHT-see) is a timing signal that is part of a video recording.
  • VHS (Video Home System) - VHS (Video Home System) is a widely-adopted videocassette recording (VCR) technology that was developed by Japan Victor Company (JVC) and put on the market in 1976.
  • Video as a Service (VaaS) - Video as a Service (VaaS) is a delivery model where video conferencing capabilities are outsourced to a managed service provider and delivered over an IP network.
  • video conferencing (video conference) - A video conference is a live, visual connection between two or more people residing in separate locations for the purpose of communication.
  • video game design - Video game design is the process of conceiving, planning and directing the creation of a video game.
  • Video glossary - 3-point edit - Marking three of the four points needed to place a source clip into a program and allowing the editing software to calculate the fourth point.
  • video projector - A video projector is an electronic device that takes input audio/visual signals and outputs video onto any flat surface.
  • video streaming service - A video streaming service is an on demand online entertainment source for TV shows, movies and other streaming media.
  • video wall - A video wall is a large display consisting of more than one video screen fixed together to form a single logical screen.
  • virtual asset - A virtual asset is a representation of currency in some environment or situation, such as a video game or a financial trading simulation exercise.
  • Virtual Choir - Virtual Choir is an assembly of geographically dispersed singers performing choral works, led by composer Eric Whitacre.
  • virtual desktop manager - A virtual desktop manager is a program that allows a computer user to have more than one user interface available simultaneously on a single computer.
  • Virtual Earth - Virtual Earth is a Web-based, interactive geographical guide that allows users to search and observe maps and aerial photographs of specific areas, neighborhoods, and points of interest on the earth's surface.
  • virtual keyboard - A virtual keyboard is a computer keyboard that a user operates by typing on or within a wireless- or optical-detectable surface or area rather than by depressing physical keys.
  • virtual reality gaming (VR gaming) - At its simplest, a VR game might involve a 3-D image that can be explored interactively on a computing device by manipulating keys, mouse or touchscreen.
  • virtual reality therapy (VR therapy) - Virtual reality therapy (VR therapy) is the use of simulated interactive and immersive environments as a tool for physical or psychological healthcare applications.
  • virtuality continuum - The virtuality continuum is the range of technologies integrating digital content into the user’s physical reality.
  • vision-correcting display - A vision-correcting display distorts the images on users' screens according to algorithms based on their prescriptions for eyeglasses.
  • visualization - Visualization is the process of representing abstract business or scientific data as images that can aid in understanding the meaning of the data.
  • vocoder - A vocoder is an audio processor that captures the characteristic elements of an an audio signal and then uses this characteristic signal to affect other audio signals.
  • voice recognition (speaker recognition) - Voice or speaker recognition is the ability of a machine or program to receive and interpret dictation or to understand and carry out spoken commands.
  • voxel - A voxel is a unit of graphic information that defines a point in three-dimensional space.
  • VR headset (virtual reality headset) - A virtual reality headset is a heads-up display (HUD) that allows users to interact with simulated environments and experience a first-person view (FPV).
  • VR locomotion (virtual reality locomotion) - VR locomotion is technology that enables movement from one place to another (locomotion) within a virtual reality environment.
  • VR room (virtual reality room) - Unlike seated or stationary VR, a VR room allows the user to move around with a fair degree of freedom, which more closely replicates a real-world experience.
  • wallpaper - On a computer that is provided with a desktop kind of user interface, wallpaper is the background pattern or picture against which desktop menus, icons, and other elements are displayed and moved around.
  • Wave file - A Wave file is an audio file format, created by Microsoft, that has become a standard PC audio file format for everything from system and game sounds to CD-quality audio.
  • wavetable - In computer technology, a wavetable is a table of stored sound waves that are digitized samples of actual recorded sound.
  • Webcast - Also see push technology, another usage.
  • WebGL - WebGL is a graphics application programming interface (API) created for use in web applications.
  • webinar - A webinar is an educational, informative or instructional presentation that is made available online, usually as video or audio with slides.
  • whiteboard - A whiteboard is a non-electronic variation of the traditional "rewriteable" schoolroom blackboard, but is white instead of black and of a material that can be written on with colored markers (known as dry erase markers).
  • WinAMP (Windows Audio MPEG Player) - WinAMP (Windows Audio MPEG Player) is a program from Nullsoft that allows PC users to play audio files, particularly music, in many (but not all) popular digital audio formats, including MS-Audio, WAV, and MP3.
  • Windows Mixed Reality - Windows Mixed Reality is a Microsoft platform for virtual reality (VR), augmented reality (AR) and mixed reality (MR).
  • WYSIWYG (what you see is what you get) - A WYSIWYG (pronounced "wiz-ee-wig") editor or program is one that allows a developer to see what the end result will look like while the interface or document is being created.
  • X (compact disc access time) - In compact disc (CD) and digital versatile disc (DVD) technology, X is a base multiplier that expresses the speed with which data could be read (the read access time) from the compact disc in its original version, which was 150 kilobytes (KB) per second.
  • x and y coordinates - x, y coordinates are respectively the horizontal and vertical addresses of any pixel or addressable point on a computer display screen.
  • XDMA (Xing Distributed Media Architecture) - XDMA (Xing Distributed Media Architecture) is a network architecture for multicast streaming media transmissions.
  • Xerox - Xerox is a provider of document-related technology and services.
  • Yellow Book - The Yellow Book is the informal name for Philips and Sony's ECMA-130 standard specification for compact disc, read-only-memory (CD-ROM).
  • z coordinate - A z coordinate is the third-dimensional coordinate in a volume pixel, or voxel.
  • z-buffering - Z-buffering is an algorithm used in 3-D graphics to ensure that perspective works the same way in the virtual world as it does in the real one: a solid object in the foreground will block the view of one behind it.
  • zoetrope - The zoetrope (pronounced ZOH-uh-trohp), invented in 1834 by William George Horner, was an early form of motion picture projector that consisted of a drum containing a set of still images, that was turned in a circular fashion in order to create the illusion of motion.
  • zoopraxiscope - The zoopraxiscope (pronounced ZOH-uh-PRACKS-uh-scohp), invented by British photographer Eadweard Muybridge and first shown in 1879, was a primitive version of later motion picture devices which worked by showing a sequence of still photographs in rapid succession.
  • Zune - The Zune is a portable digital media player from Microsoft.
  • ZV port (Zoomed Video port) - The Zoomed Video port (ZV port) is a technology that supports the delivery of full-screen motion video and multimedia to notebook computers.

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