Browse Definitions :

Network administration

Terms related to managing computer networks, including definitions about LANS or WANS and words and phrases about network design, troubleshooting, security and backups.

OPE - SOF

  • Open Grid Services Architecture (OGSA) - The Open Grid Services Architecture (OGSA) is a set of standards defining the way in which information is shared among diverse components of large, heterogeneous grid systems.
  • OpenFlow - OpenFlow is a protocol that allows a server to tell network switches where to send packets.
  • OpenFlow controller - An OpenFlow controller is an application that manages flow control in a software-defined networking (SDN) environment.
  • OpenFlow switch - An OpenFlow switch is a software program or hardware device that forwards packets in a software-defined networking (SDN) environment.
  • OpenStack Neutron (formerly called Quantum) - OpenStack Neutron is a cloud networking controller and a networking-as-a-service project within the OpenStack cloud computing initiative.
  • operational costs - Definition - In information technology, operational costs document the price of running of IT services on a day-to-day basis.
  • operational level agreement (OLA) - An operational level agreement (OLA) is a contract that defines how various IT groups within a company plan to deliver a service or set of services.
  • operational support system (OSS) - An operational support system (OSS) is a set of programs that help a communications service provider monitor, control, analyze and manage a telephone or computer network.
  • operational technology (OT) - Operational technology (OT) is a category of hardware and software that monitors and controls how physical devices perform.
  • OpLock (opportunistic lock) - OpLocks are made to enable simultaneous file access by multiple users while also improving performance for synchronized caches.
  • OSI model (Open Systems Interconnection) - OSI (Open Systems Interconnection) is a reference model for how applications communicate over a network.
  • OTA update (over-the-air update) - An over-the-air (OTA) update is the wireless delivery of new software, firmware, or other data to mobile devices.
  • package manager or package management system (PMS) - A package manager, also known as a package management system (PMS), is a program used to install, uninstall and manage software packages.
  • packet coalescing - In network adapters using Network Driver Interface Specification (NDIS) versions 6.
  • passive optical network (PON) - A passive optical network (PON) is a system commonly used by telecommunications network providers that brings fiber optic cabling and signals all or most of the way to the end user.
  • Path Computation Element Protocol (PCEP) - Path Computation Element (PCE) is a network component, application or node that can apply computational constraints and compute a network path or route by applying computational constraints in real time.
  • pathing (path control) - Pathing (sometimes called path control) is a networking approach used to address the specific needs of storage networks (as compared to ordinary message networks) by changing the way that communication paths are managed and organized.
  • peer-to-peer (P2P) - Peer-to-peer (P2P) is a decentralized communications model in which each party has the same capabilities and either party can initiate a communication session.
  • performance testing - Performance testing is a testing measure that evaluates the speed, responsiveness and stability of a computer, network, software program or device under a workload.
  • personal area network (PAN) - A personal area network (PAN) is the interconnection of information technology devices within the range of an individual person, typically within a range of 10 meters.
  • piggybacking - Piggybacking, in a wireless communications context, is the unauthorized use of a wireless LAN.
  • ping - A ping (Packet Internet or Inter-Network Groper) is a basic internet program that enables a user to test and verify if a particular destination Internet Protocol (IP) address exists and can accept requests in computer network administration.
  • ping sweep (ICMP sweep) - A ping sweep (also known as an ICMP sweep) is a basic network scanning technique used to determine which of a range of IP addresses map to live hosts (computers).
  • poison reverse - In a computer network that uses the Routing Information Protocol (RIP) or other distance vector routing protocol, poison reverse is a loop avoidance process.
  • policy engine - A policy engine is a software component that allows an organization to create, monitor and enforce rules about how network resources and the organization's data can be accessed.
  • policy-based management - Policy-based management is an administrative approach that is used to simplify the management of a given endeavor by establishing policies to deal with situations that are likely to occur.
  • policy-based networking - Policy-based networking is the management of a network so that various kinds of traffic - data, voice, and video - get the priority of availability and bandwidth needed to serve the network's users effectively.
  • polling - In electronic communication, 'polling' is the continuous checking of other programs or devices by one progam or device to see what state they are in, usually to see whether they are still connected or want to communicate.
  • Port Address Translation (PAT) - Port Address Translation (PAT), is an extension to network address translation (NAT) that permits multiple devices on a local area network (LAN) to be mapped to a single public IP address.
  • port mirroring (roving analysis port) - Port mirroring is an approach to monitoring network traffic that involves forwarding a copy of each packet from one network switch port to another.
  • port number - Port number is a way to identify a specific process to which an internet or other network message is to be forwarded when it arrives at a server.
  • power usage effectiveness (PUE) - Power usage effectiveness (PUE) is a metric used to determine the energy efficiency of a data center.
  • POX - POX is an open source development platform for Python-based software-defined networking (SDN) control applications, such as OpenFlow SDN controllers.
  • presence technology - Presence technology is a type of application that makes it possible to locate and identify a computing device wherever it might be, as soon as the user connects to the network.
  • private certificate authority (CA) - Private CA stands for private certificate authority and is an enterprise specific certificate authority that functions like a publicly trusted CA but is exclusively run by or for the enterprise.
  • private cloud appliance - A private cloud appliance is a hardware device that provides software-defined converged infrastructure functions for an organization’s proprietary network.
  • private IP address - A private IP address is a range of non-internet facing IP addresses used in an internal network.
  • privileged identity management (PIM) - Privileged identity management (PIM) is the monitoring and protection of superuser accounts in an organization’s IT environments.
  • problem - A problem, in an IT service management (ITSM) context, is an issue that could cause an incident.
  • programmable logic controller (PLC) - A programmable logic controller (PLC) is a small, modular solid state computer with customized instructions for performing a particular task.
  • promiscuous mode - In computer networking, promiscuous mode is a mode of operation, as well as a security, monitoring and administration technique.
  • proxy hacking - Proxy hacking is a cyber attack technique designed to supplant an authentic webpage in a search engine's index and search results pages to drive traffic to an imitation site.
  • proxy server - A proxy server is a dedicated computer or a software system running on a computer that acts as an intermediary between an endpoint device, such as a computer, and another server from which a user or client is requesting a service.
  • push (or server-push) - Push (or "server-push") is the delivery of information on the Web that is initiated by the information server rather than by the information user or client, as it usually is.
  • quality of service (QoS) - Quality of service (QoS) refers to any technology that manages data traffic to reduce packet loss, latency and jitter on a network.
  • race condition - A race condition is an undesirable situation that occurs when a device or system attempts to perform two or more operations at the same time, but because of the nature of the device or system, the operations must be done in the proper sequence to be done correctly.
  • RADIUS (Remote Authentication Dial-In User Service) - RADIUS (Remote Authentication Dial-In User Service) is a client-server protocol and software that enables remote access servers to communicate with a central server to authenticate dial-in users and authorize their access to the requested system or service.
  • RAT (remote access Trojan) - A remote access Trojan (RAT) is a malware program that gives an intruder administrative control over a target computer.
  • real-time application (RTA) - A real-time application is an application program that functions within a time frame that the user senses as immediate or current.
  • real-time location system (RTLS) - A real-time location system (RTLS) is one of a number of technologies used to pinpoint the current geographic position and location of a target.
  • real-time monitoring - Real-time (data) monitoring is the delivery of continuously updated information streaming at zero or low latency.
  • Real-time Transport Protocol (RTP) - Real-time Transport Protocol (RTP) is a network standard designed for transmitting audio or video data that is optimized for consistent delivery of live data.
  • Receive Segment Coalescing (RSC) - Receive Segment Coalescing (RSC) is an offload technology in Windows Server 2012 and Windows Server 2012 R2 that can help reduce how much of the CPU is used in network processing.
  • registration, admission, and status (RAS) - Registration, admission, and status (RAS) is a component of a network protocol that involves the addition of (or refusal to add) new authorized users, the admission of (or refusal to admit) authorized users based on available bandwidth, and the tracking of the status of all users.
  • Reliability, Availability and Serviceability (RAS) - Reliability, Availability and Serviceability (RAS) is a set of related attributes that must be considered when designing, manufacturing, purchasing or using a computer product or component.
  • remote access - Remote access is the ability for an authorized person to access a computer or network from a geographical distance through a network connection.
  • remote desktop - A remote desktop is a program or an operating system feature that allows a user to connect to a computer in another location, see that computer's desktop and interact with it as if it were local.
  • remote desktop protocol (RDP) - Remote desktop protocol (RDP) is a secure network communications protocol from Microsoft.
  • Remote Installation Service (RIS) - Remote Installation Service (RIS) is a feature included in Microsoft's Windows 2000 server that allows network administrators to install the Windows 2000 Professional operating system and its upgrades to any number of client computers at one time from a centralized location.
  • remote replication - Remote replication is the process of copying production data to a device at a remote location for data protection or disaster recovery purposes.
  • remote wakeup (RWU) - Remote wakeup (RWU) is a general term for the powering-up of (turning on) a computer over a network.
  • Rich Internet Application (RIA) - A rich Internet application (RIA) is a Web application designed to deliver the same features and functions normally associated with deskop applications.
  • ring network - A ring network is a local area network (LAN) in which the nodes (workstations or other devices) are connected in a closed loop configuration.
  • RMON (Remote Network Monitoring) - RMON (Remote Network Monitoring) provides standard information that a network administrator can use to monitor, analyze, and troubleshoot a group of distributed local area networks (LANs) and interconnecting T-1/E-1 and T-2/E-3 lines from a central site.
  • Routing Information Protocol (RIP) - Routing Information Protocol (RIP) is a distance vector protocol that uses hop count as its primary metric.
  • routing table - A routing table is a set of rules, often viewed in table format, that is used to determine where data packets traveling over an Internet Protocol (IP) network will be directed.
  • RSAT (Microsoft Remote Server Administration Tools) - RSAT (Remote Server Administration Tools) is a feature that began in Windows Server 2008 R2 to help admins remotely manage computers running Windows Server.
  • RSVP (Resource Reservation Protocol) - RSVP (Resource Reservation Protocol) is a set of communication rules that allows channels or paths on the Internet to be reserved for the multicast (one source to many receivers) transmission of video and other high-bandwidth messages.
  • runbook - Runbooks are a set of standardized written procedures for completing repetitive IT processes within a company.
  • SD-WAN (software-defined WAN) - Software-defined WAN (SD-WAN) is technology that uses software-defined networking (SDN) concepts to distribute network traffic across a wide area network (WAN).
  • SDDC (software-defined data center) - An SDDC (software-defined data center) is a data storage facility in which networking, storage, CPU and security are virtualized and delivered as a service.
  • SDN application (software-defined networking application) - An SDN application is a software program designed to perform a task in a software-defined networking (SDN) environment.
  • SDN controller (software-defined networking controller) - An SDN controller is an application in a software-defined networking (SDN) architecture that manages flow control for improved network management and application performance.
  • Secure Access Service Edge (SASE) - Secure Access Service Edge, also known as SASE -- pronounced 'sassy' -- is a cloud architecture that bundles network and security solutions together and delivers them as a unified cloud service.
  • Secure Shell (SSH) - SSH, also known as Secure Shell or Secure Socket Shell, is a network protocol that gives users, particularly system administrators, a secure way to access a computer over an unsecured network.
  • Security as a Service (SaaS) - Security-as-a-service (SaaS) is an outsourcing model for security management.
  • security information management (SIM) - Security information management (SIM) is the practice of collecting, monitoring and analyzing security-related data from computer logs and various other data sources.
  • server consolidation - Server consolidation is an approach to the efficient usage of computer server resources in order to reduce the total number of servers or server locations that an organization requires.
  • server farm (Web farm, Web server farm) - A server farm is a group of computers acting as servers and housed together in a single location.
  • Server Message Block protocol (SMB protocol) - The Server Message Block protocol (SMB protocol) is a client-server communication protocol used for sharing access to files, printers, serial ports and other resources on a network.
  • service desk - An IT service desk is a communications center that provides a single point of contact (SPOC) between a company, its customers, employees and business partners.
  • service mesh - A service mesh is a dedicated infrastructure layer that controls service-to-service communication over a network.
  • session border controller (SBC) - A session border controller (SBC) is a dedicated hardware device or software application that governs the manner in which phone calls are initiated, conducted and terminated on a voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) network.
  • shadow IT - Shadow IT is hardware or software that is not supported by an organization's IT department.
  • Shared Key Authentication (SKA) - Shared Key Authentication (SKA) is a process by which a computer can gain access to a wireless network that uses the Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) protocol.
  • Shodan - Shodan (Sentient Hyper-Optimised Data Access Network) is a search engine designed to map and gather information about internet-connected devices and systems.
  • short message service center (SMSC) - The short message service center (SMSC) is the portion of a mobile phone network that handles text message operations.
  • shrink wrap license - A shrink wrap license is an end user agreement (EULA) that is enclosed with software in plastic-wrapped packaging.
  • Simian Army - The Simian Army is a collection of open source cloud testing tools created by the online video streaming company, Netflix.
  • Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) - Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) is an application-layer protocol for monitoring and managing network devices on a local area network (LAN) or wide area network (WAN).
  • SIP trunking (Session Initiation Protocol trunking) - Session Initiation Protocol trunking is a service offered by a communications service provider that uses the protocol to provision voice over IP connectivity between an on-premises phone system and the public switched telephone network.
  • Skinny Client Control Protocol (SCCP) - Skinny Client Control Protocol (SCCP) is a Cisco proprietary standard for terminal control for use with voice over IP (VoIP).
  • Skype - Skype is an Internet telephony service provider that offers free calling between computers and low-cost calling to regular telephones that aren't connected to the Internet.
  • sliding window (windowing) - The sliding window (windowing) technique is used by Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) to manage the flow of packets between two computers or network hosts.
  • SMS gateway - An SMS gateway is a website that allows users to send SMS messages from a web browser to people within the cell served by that gateway.
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