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Network software

Terms related to network software, including definitions about network monitoring and words and phrases about network administration.

802 - LDI

  • 802.16c - 802.16c is a set of clarifications and updates to the 102.
  • AAA server (authentication, authorization, and accounting) - An AAA server is a server program that handles user requests for access to computer resources and, for an enterprise, provides authentication, authorization, and accounting (AAA) services.
  • active directory - Active Directory (AD) is Microsoft's proprietary directory service.
  • Advanced Peer-to-Peer Networking (APPN) - Advanced Peer-to-Peer Networking (APPN), part of IBM's Systems Network Architecture (SNA), is a group of protocols for setting up or configuring program-to-program communication within an IBM SNA network.
  • analog telephone adapter (ATA) - An analog telephone adaptor (ATA) is a device used to connect a standard telephone to a computer or network so that the user can make calls over the Internet.
  • Apache HTTP Server - Apache HTTP Server is a freely-available Web server software package that is distributed under an open source license.
  • Apache Kafka - Apache Kafka is a distributed publish-subscribe messaging system that receives data from disparate source systems and makes the data available to target systems in real time.
  • application awareness - Application awareness is the capacity of a system to maintain information about connected applications to optimize their operation and that of any subsystems that they run or control.
  • application clustering (software clustering) - Application clustering (sometimes called software clustering) is a method of turning multiple computer servers into a cluster (a group of servers that acts like a single system).
  • Application layer - Sitting at Layer 7 -- the very top of the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) communications model -- the application layer provides services for an application program to ensure that effective communication with another application program on a network is possible.
  • application performance monitoring (APM) - Application performance monitoring (APM) is the collection of tools and processes designed to help information technology (IT) professionals ensure that the applications users work with meet performance standards and provide a valuable user experience (UX).
  • application server - An application server is a server program in a computer in a distributed network that provides the business logic for an application program.
  • application streaming - Application streaming is an on-demand software delivery model that takes advantage of the fact that most applications require only a small fraction of their total program code to run.
  • authentication, authorization, and accounting (AAA) - Authentication, authorization, and accounting (AAA) is a framework for intelligently controlling access to computer resources, enforcing policies, auditing usage, and providing the information necessary to bill for services.
  • automated speech recognition (ASR) - Automated speech recognition (ASR) is a technology that allows users of information systems to speak entries rather than punching numbers on a keypad.
  • Automatic Private IP Addressing (APIPA) - Automatic Private IP Addressing (APIPA) is a feature of Windows-based operating systems (included in Windows 98, ME, 2000, and XP) that enables a computer to automatically assign itself an IP address when there is no Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) server available to perform that function.
  • autotrunking - Autotrunking is a function that can be activated for one or more switch ports in a Cisco system of virtual local area networks (VLANs), making those ports capable of carrying traffic for any or all of the VLANs accessible by a particular switch.
  • backhaul - Backhaul, a term probably derived from the trucking industry, has several usages in information technology.
  • block - A block is a contiguous set of bits or bytes that forms an identifiable unit of data.
  • BOOTP (Bootstrap Protocol) - BOOTP (Bootstrap Protocol) is an internet protocol that lets a network user automatically be configured to receive an IP address and have an operating system booted without user involvement.
  • BREW (Binary Runtime Environment for Wireless) - BREW (Binary Runtime Environment for Wireless) is Qualcomm's open source application development platform for wireless devices equipped for code division multiple access (CDMA) technology.
  • cache (computing) - A cache -- pronounced CASH -- is hardware or software that is used to store something, usually data, temporarily in a computing environment.
  • captive portal - A captive portal is a Web page that the user of a public-access network is obliged to view and interact with before access is granted.
  • certification - In information technology as in other fields such as teaching, accounting, and acupuncture, certification is a formal process of making certain that an individual is qualified in terms of particular knowledge or skills.
  • CIDR (Classless Inter-Domain Routing or supernetting) - CIDR (Classless Inter-Domain Routing) -- also known as supernetting -- is a method of assigning Internet Protocol (IP) addresses that improves the efficiency of address distribution and replaces the previous system based on class A, class B and class C networks.
  • circuit-switched - Circuit-switched is a type of network in which a physical path is obtained for and dedicated to a single connection between two end-points in the network for the duration of the connection.
  • Cisco Enterprise Agreement (EA) - Cisco Enterprise Agreement (EA) is a software buying program that digitizes and simplifies license management for Cisco suite customers.
  • Class of Service (CoS) - Class of Service (CoS) is a way of managing traffic in a network by grouping similar types of traffic (for example, e-mail, streaming video, voice, large document file transfer) together and treating each type as a class with its own level of service priority.
  • cloaking - Cloaking is the masking of the sender's name and address in an e-mail note or distribution.
  • Clonezilla - Clonezilla is a free open source disk cloning application based on Debian.
  • Cluster Labs Pacemaker - Pacemaker is an open source high-availability cluster software developed from a collaboration between Red Hat and Novell.
  • codec - A codec is either a hardware device or a software-based process that compresses and decompresses large amounts of data used in voice over IP, video conferencing and streaming media.
  • collision - In a half duplex Ethernet network, a collision is the result of two devices on the same network attempting to transmit data at exactly the same time.
  • communication portal - A communication portal is a service that allows individuals, businesses, schools and government agencies to share information from diverse sources using unified communications (UC) media.
  • communications-enabled business processes (CEBP) - Communications-enabled business processes (CEBP) is the integration of communications capabilities into software-enabled business procedures, applications and technologies.
  • connection - In telecommunication and computing in general, a connection is the successful completion of necessary arrangements so that two or more parties (for example, people or programs) can communicate at a long distance.
  • connection broker - In desktop virtualization, a connection broker is a software program that allows the end-user to connect to an available desktop.
  • connection-oriented - In telecommunications, connection-oriented describes a means of transmitting data in which the devices at the end points use a preliminary protocol to establish an end-to-end connection before any data is sent.
  • connectionless - In telecommunications, connectionless describes communication between two network endpoints in which a message can be sent from one endpoint to another without prior arrangement.
  • CRAM (challenge-response authentication mechanism) - CRAM (challenge-response authentication mechanism) is the two-level scheme for authenticating network users that is used as part of the Web's Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP).
  • cross-bar switch - In a network, a cross-bar switch is a device that is capable of channeling data between any two devices that are attached to it up to its maximum number of ports.
  • CSMA/CA (Carrier Sense Multiple Access/Collision Avoidance) - CSMA/CA (Carrier Sense Multiple Access/Collision Avoidance) is a protocol for carrier transmission in 802.
  • cyclic redundancy checking - Cyclic redundancy checking is a method of checking for errors in data that has been transmitted on a communications link.
  • data availability - Data availability is a term used by some computer storage manufacturers and storage service providers (SSPs) to describe products and services that ensure that data continues to be available at a required level of performance in situations ranging from normal through "disastrous.
  • data center services - Data center services is a collective term for all the supporting components necessary to the proper operation of data center.
  • data link control (DLC) - DLC also is an abbreviation for digital loop carrier.
  • data streaming - Data streaming is the continuous transfer of data at a steady, high-speed rate.
  • Data-Link layer - The data link layer is the protocol layer in a program that handles the moving of data into and out of a physical link in a network.
  • DCE (Distributed Computing Environment) - In network computing, DCE (Distributed Computing Environment) is an industry-standard software technology for setting up and managing computing and data exchange in a system of distributed computers.
  • deep packet inspection (DPI) - Deep packet inspection (DPI) is an advanced method of examining and managing network traffic.
  • desktop virtualization - Desktop virtualization is the concept of isolating a logical operating system (OS) instance from the client that is used to access it.
  • DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol) - DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol) is a network management protocol used to dynamically assign an Internet Protocol (IP) address to any device, or node, on a network so they can communicate using IP.
  • Differentiated Services (DiffServ, or DS) - Differentiated Services (DiffServ, or DS) is a protocol for specifying and controlling network traffic by class so that certain types of traffic get precedence - for example, voice traffic, which requires a relatively uninterrupted flow of data, might get precedence over other kinds of traffic.
  • Directory Services Restore Mode (DSRM) - Directory Services Restore Mode (DSRM) is a safe mode boot option for Windows Server domain controllers.
  • Distributed Control Plane Architecture (DCPA) - A Distributed Control Plane Architecture (DCPA) is a network architecture that makes it possible to allocate control protocol functions across multiple processor levels in the network system.
  • domain controller - Primary domain controller (PDC) and backup domain controller (BDC) are roles that can be assigned to a server in a network of computers that use the Windows NT operating system.
  • DSC pull server - A DSC pull server (desired state configuration pull server) is an automation server that allows configurations to be maintained on many servers, computer workstations and devices across a network.
  • dynamic multi-pathing (DMP) - Dynamic multi-pathing (DMP) is a type of communication path control software application.
  • ECC (error correction code or error checking and correcting) - ECC (either "error correction [or correcting] code" or "error checking and correcting") allows data that is being read or transmitted to be checked for errors and, when necessary, corrected on the fly.
  • encoding and decoding - Encoding and decoding are used in many forms of communications, including computing, data communications, programming, digital electronics and human communications.
  • endpoint security (endpoint security management) - Endpoint security is an approach to network protection that requires each computing device on a corporate network to comply with certain standards before network access is granted.
  • Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (EIGRP) - Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (EIGRP) is a network protocol that enables routers to exchange information more efficiently than earlier network protocols, such as Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (IGRP) or Border Gateway Protocol (BGP).
  • Ethernet - Ethernet is the traditional technology for connecting devices in a wired local area network (LAN) or wide area network (WAN), enabling them to communicate with each other via a protocol -- a set of rules or common network language.
  • Ethernet/IP (Ethernet Industrial Protocol) - Ethernet/IP (Ethernet Industrial Protocol) is a network communication standard capable of handling large amounts of data at speeds of 10 Mbps or 100 Mbps, and at up to 1500 bytes per packet.
  • event handler - An event handler is a callback routine that operates asynchronously and handles inputs received into a program.
  • file server - A file server is a computer responsible for the storage and management of data files so that other computers on the same network can access the files.
  • flooding (network) - In a computer network, flooding occurs when a router uses a non-adaptive routing algorithm to send an incoming packet to every outgoing link except the node on which the packet arrived.
  • flow control - Flow control is the management of data flow between computers or devices or between nodes in a network so that the data can be handled at an efficient pace.
  • FlowVisor - FlowVisor is an experimental software-defined networking controller that enables network virtualization by slicing a physical network into multiple logical networks.
  • forward error correction (FEC) - Forward error correction (FEC) is a method of obtaining error control in data transmission in which the source (transmitter) sends redundant data and the destination (receiver) recognizes only the portion of the data that contains no apparent errors.
  • frame relay - Frame relay is an affordable way to transmit switched-packet data within LANs and WANs.
  • gatekeeper - A gatekeeper is a management tool for H.
  • Gigabit Ethernet (GbE) - Gigabit Ethernet (GbE), a transmission technology based on the Ethernet frame format and protocol used in local area networks (LANs), provides a data rate of 1 billion bits per second, or 1 gigabit (Gb).
  • GMPLS (Generalized Multiprotocol Label Switching or Multiprotocol Lambda Switching) - GMPLS (Generalized Multiprotocol Label Switching), also known as Multiprotocol Lambda Switching, is a technology that provides enhancements to Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) to support network switching for time, wavelength, and space switching as well as for packet switching.
  • grid computing - Grid computing uses small, distributed resources from servers and PCs to solve big problems.
  • GTAG (Global Tag) - GTAG (Global Tag) is a standardization initiative of the Uniform Code Council (UCC) and the European Article Numbering Association (EAN) for asset tracking and logistics based on radio frequency identification (RFID).
  • H.245 - H.245 is a protocol for the transmission of call management and control signals in packet-based networks using H.
  • HAProxy - HAProxy (High Availability Proxy), developed by HAProxy Technologies LLC, is an open source load balancer proxy for TCP and HTTP applications.
  • HELLO packet - In the Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) communications protocol - which enables network routers to share information with each other, a HELLO packet is a special packet (message) that is sent out periodically from a router to establish and confirm network adjacency relationships.
  • high availability (HA) - High availability (HA) is the ability of a system to operate continuously without failing for a designated period of time.
  • HP OpenView - HP OpenView is a suite of business computer management or "e-services" programs from Hewlett-Packard (HP), which states that the suite is "among the world's 20 largest software businesses.
  • hybrid SDN - A hybrid SDN (software-defined network) is a network where both traditional networking and SDN protocols operate in the same environment.
  • HyperTerminal - HyperTerminal is a communications and terminal emulation program that came with the Windows 98 and Windows XP operating systems.
  • IEEE 802 wireless standards - The IEEE 802 standard is a collection of networking standards that cover the physical and data-link layer specifications for technologies such as Ethernet and wireless.
  • interconnection - Interconnection is a strategy for ensuring that businesses can privately, securely and directly exchange digital information.
  • intrusion prevention system (IPS) - An intrusion prevention system (IPS) is a network security and threat prevention tool.
  • IoT middleware (Internet of Things middleware) - Internet of Things (IoT) middleware is software that serves as an interface between components of the IoT, joining elements that would not otherwise be able to connect and communicate.
  • IP address management (IPAM) - Internet Protocol address management (IPAM) is a method of tracking and modifying the information associated with a network's Internet Protocol address (IP address) space.
  • iptables - Iptables is a generic table structure that defines rules and commands as part of the netfilter framework that facilitates Network Address Translation (NAT), packet filtering, and packet mangling in the Linux 2.
  • iSCSI (Internet Small Computer System Interface) - ISCSI is a transport layer protocol that describes how Small Computer System Interface (SCSI) packets should be transported over a TCP/IP network.
  • ISSU (in-service software upgrade) - An ISSU (in-service software upgrade) is a technique for updating software on a network device without taking that device offline and thereby disrupting network services.
  • IT systems management - Systems management is the administration of the information technology systems in an enterprise data center.
  • Java Message Service (JMS) - Java Message Service (JMS) is an application program interface (API) from Sun Microsystems that supports the formal communication known as messaging between computers in a network.
  • JNDI (Java Naming and Directory Interface) - JNDI (Java Naming and Directory Interface) enables Java platform-based applications to access multiple naming and directory services.
  • job scheduler - A job scheduler is a program that enables an enterprise to schedule and, in some cases, monitor computer 'batch' jobs (units of work, such as the running of a payroll program).
  • keylogger (keystroke logger or system monitor) - A keylogger, sometimes called a keystroke logger or system monitor, is a type of surveillance technology used to monitor and record each keystroke typed on a specific computer's keyboard.
  • LAN-free backup - LAN-free backup is the process of backing up server data to a centralized storage device rather than moving it across a local-area network (LAN).
  • latency - Latency is the delay from the input into a system to a desired outcome.
  • LDAP (Lightweight Directory Access Protocol) - LDAP (Lightweight Directory Access Protocol) is a software protocol for enabling anyone to locate data such as organizations, individuals and other resources such as files and devices in a network -- whether on the public internet or on a corporate intranet.
  • LDIF (Lightweight Directory Interchange Format) - LDIF (Lightweight Directory Interchange Format) is an ASCII file format used to exchange data and enable the synchronization of that data between Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) servers called Directory System Agents (DSAs).
SearchCompliance
  • OPSEC (operations security)

    OPSEC (operations security) is a security and risk management process and strategy that classifies information, then determines ...

  • smart contract

    A smart contract is a decentralized application that executes business logic in response to events.

  • compliance risk

    Compliance risk is an organization's potential exposure to legal penalties, financial forfeiture and material loss, resulting ...

SearchSecurity
  • COBIT

    COBIT is an IT governance framework for businesses wanting to implement, monitor and improve IT management best practices.

  • email spam

    Email spam, also known as junk email, refers to unsolicited email messages, usually sent in bulk to a large list of recipients.

  • security policy

    A security policy is a document that states in writing how a company plans to protect its physical and information technology (IT...

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SearchDisasterRecovery
  • What is risk mitigation?

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

  • change control

    Change control is a systematic approach to managing all changes made to a product or system.

  • disaster recovery (DR)

    Disaster recovery (DR) is an organization's ability to respond to and recover from an event that affects business operations.

SearchStorage
  • JBOD (just a bunch of disks)

    JBOD, which stands for 'just a bunch of disks,' is a type of multilevel configuration for disks.

  • bare-metal restore

    A bare-metal restore (also referred to as bare-metal recovery or bare-metal backup) is a data recovery and restoration process ...

  • mSATA SSD (mSATA solid-state drive)

    An mSATA SSD is a solid-state drive (SSD) that conforms to the mSATA interface specification developed by the Serial ATA (SATA) ...

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