Browse Definitions :

Network software

Terms related to network software, including definitions about network monitoring and words and phrases about network administration.

802 - ETH

  • 802.11a - 802.11a is one of several specifications in the 802.
  • 802.11k - 802.11k is a proposed standard for a series of measurement requests and reports involving channel selection, roaming, transmit power control (TPC), and subscriber statistics in 802.
  • 802.16 - 802.16 is a group of broadband wireless communications standards for metropolitan area networks (MANs) developed by a working group of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE).
  • 802.16a - 802.16a is a wireless communications specification for metropolitan area networks (MANs).
  • 802.16c - 802.16c is a set of clarifications and updates to the 102.
  • AAA server (authentication, authorization, and accounting) - An AAA server is a server program that handles user requests for access to computer resources and, for an enterprise, provides authentication, authorization, and accounting (AAA) services.
  • AARP (AppleTalk Address Resolution Protocol) - AARP (AppleTalk Address Resolution Protocol) is a way to map between the physical hardware addresses of computers, such as those known to an Ethernet or token ring local area network, and their temporarily assigned AppleTalk network addresses.
  • Active Directory - Active Directory (AD) is a Microsoft product that consists of several services that run on Windows Server to manage permissions and access to networked resources.
  • active network - An active network is a network in which the nodes are programmed to perform custom operations on the messages that pass through the node.
  • Advanced Peer-to-Peer Networking (APPN) - Advanced Peer-to-Peer Networking (APPN), part of IBM's Systems Network Architecture (SNA), is a group of protocols for setting up or configuring program-to-program communication within an IBM SNA network.
  • AMTOR (amateur teleprinting over radio) - AMTOR (amateur teleprinting over radio) is a digital communications method used by radio amateurs, in which the frequency of errors is reduced by handshaking or character repetition.
  • analog telephone adapter (ATA) - An analog telephone adaptor (ATA) is a device used to connect a standard telephone to a computer or network so that the user can make calls over the Internet.
  • Apache HTTP Server - Apache HTTP Server is a freely-available Web server software package that is distributed under an open source license.
  • Apache HTTP server project - The Apache HTTP server project is a collaborative open source Web server development initiative.
  • Apache Kafka - Apache Kafka is a distributed publish-subscribe messaging system that receives data from disparate source systems and makes the data available to target systems in real time.
  • Appleshare - The AppleShare protocol is a communications protocol from Apple Computer that allows client applications in a computer to exchange files with and request services from server programs in a computer network.
  • AppleTalk - AppleTalk is a set of local area network communication protocols originally created for Apple computers.
  • application awareness - Application awareness is the capacity of a system to maintain information about connected applications to optimize their operation and that of any subsystems that they run or control.
  • application clustering (software clustering) - Application clustering (sometimes called software clustering) is a method of turning multiple computer servers into a cluster (a group of servers that acts like a single system).
  • Application layer - Sitting at Layer 7 -- the very top of the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) communications model -- the application layer provides services for an application program to ensure that effective communication with another application program on a network is possible.
  • application performance monitoring (APM) - Application performance monitoring (APM) is the collection of tools and processes designed to help information technology (IT) professionals ensure that the applications users work with meet performance standards and provide a valuable user experience (UX).
  • application server - An application server is a server program in a computer in a distributed network that provides the business logic for an application program.
  • application streaming - Application streaming is an on-demand software delivery model that takes advantage of the fact that most applications require only a small fraction of their total program code to run.
  • application-defined networking - Application-defined networking (ADN) is a networking scenario in which applications have the ability to adapt network environments to meet their needs, rather than having resources allocated by the network.
  • ASN.1 (Abstract Syntax Notation One) - ASN.1 (Abstract Syntax Notation One) is a standard way to describe a message (a unit of application data) that can be sent or received in a network.
  • audit trail - In accounting, an audit trail is the sequence of paperwork that validates or invalidates accounting entries.
  • authentication, authorization, and accounting (AAA) - Authentication, authorization, and accounting (AAA) is a framework for intelligently controlling access to computer resources, enforcing policies, auditing usage, and providing the information necessary to bill for services.
  • automated speech recognition (ASR) - Automated speech recognition (ASR) is a technology that allows users of information systems to speak entries rather than punching numbers on a keypad.
  • Automatic Private IP Addressing (APIPA) - Automatic Private IP Addressing (APIPA) is a feature of Windows-based operating systems (included in Windows 98, ME, 2000, and XP) that enables a computer to automatically assign itself an IP address when there is no Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) server available to perform that function.
  • autoresponder - An autoresponder is a computer program that automatically sends an email, SMS or a series of emails to a contact list subscriber based on time or event triggers.
  • autotrunking - Autotrunking is a function that can be activated for one or more switch ports in a Cisco system of virtual local area networks (VLANs), making those ports capable of carrying traffic for any or all of the VLANs accessible by a particular switch.
  • backhaul - Backhaul, a term probably derived from the trucking industry, has several usages in information technology.
  • bandwidth test (testing your bandwidth) - A bandwidth test is a program that sends one or more files of known size over a network to a distant computer (for example, your own computer), measures the time required for the file(s) to successfully download at the destination, and thereby obtains a theoretical figure for the data speed between two or more points, usually in kilobits per second (Kbps) or megabits per second (Mbps).
  • baud - Baud was the prevalent measure for data transmission speed until replaced by a more accurate term, bps (bits per second).
  • beaming - In infrared transmission, beaming is the communication of data between wireless devices using a beam of infrared light.
  • Bearer Independent Call Control (BICC) - Bearer Independent Call Control (BICC) is a signaling protocol based on N-ISUP that is used to support narrowband ISDN service over a broadband backbone network without interfering with interfaces to the existing network and end-to-end services.
  • Big Switch Big Network Controller - Big Network Controller is the SDN controller for the Open Software Defined Network (SDN), a product suite for network virtualization released in November of 2012 by Big Switch Networks.
  • Big Switch Networks - Big Switch Networks is a network virtualization and SDN (software-defined networking) company that was founded in 2010.
  • Big Switch Networks Big Virtual Switch - Big Virtual Switch is a data center network virtualization application that runs on Big Network Controller, the SDN controller for the Open Software-Defined Network (SDN).
  • bit rate - In digital telecommunication, the bit rate is the number of bits that pass a given point in a telecommunication network in a given amount of time, usually a second.
  • bit stream - A bit stream is a contiguous sequence of bits, representing a stream of data, transmitted continously over a communications path, serially (one at a time).
  • BITNET - BITNET is a network of academic sites comparable to but separate from the Internet.
  • BitTorrent - BitTorrent is a content distribution protocol that enables efficient software distribution and peer-to-peer sharing of very large files, such as entire movies and TV shows, by enabling users to serve as network redistribution points.
  • block - A block is a contiguous set of bits or bytes that forms an identifiable unit of data.
  • BOOTP (Bootstrap Protocol) - BOOTP (Bootstrap Protocol) is a protocol that lets a network user be automatically configured (receive an IP address) and have an operating system booted (initiated) without user involvement.
  • BREW (Binary Runtime Environment for Wireless) - BREW (Binary Runtime Environment for Wireless) is Qualcomm's open source application development platform for wireless devices equipped for code division multiple access (CDMA) technology.
  • buffer credits or buffer-to-buffer credits (BBCs) - Buffer credits, also called buffer-to-buffer credits (BBCs), allow data communication in a Fibre Channelstorage area network (SAN) where there are long spans of fiber opticcable.
  • BYE packet - A BYE (or Goodbye) packet is a type of Real-Time Transport Control Protocol (RTCP) packet that is sent when a participant in a multicast event leaves the session.
  • cache (computing) - A cache -- pronounced CASH -- is hardware or software that is used to store something, usually data, temporarily in a computing environment.
  • captive portal - A captive portal is a Web page that the user of a public-access network is obliged to view and interact with before access is granted.
  • Carrier Sense Multiple Access/Collision Detect (CSMA/CD) - Carrier Sense Multiple Access/Collision Detect (CSMA/CD) is the protocol for carrier transmission access in Ethernet networks.
  • certification - In information technology as in other fields such as teaching, accounting, and acupuncture, certification is a formal process of making certain that an individual is qualified in terms of particular knowledge or skills.
  • CIDR (Classless Inter-Domain Routing or supernetting) - CIDR (Classless Inter-Domain Routing) -- also known as supernetting -- is a method of assigning Internet Protocol (IP) addresses that improves the efficiency of address distribution and replaces the previous system based on class A, class B and class C networks.
  • circuit-switched - Circuit-switched is a type of network in which a physical path is obtained for and dedicated to a single connection between two end-points in the network for the duration of the connection.
  • Class of Service (CoS) - Class of Service (CoS) is a way of managing traffic in a network by grouping similar types of traffic (for example, e-mail, streaming video, voice, large document file transfer) together and treating each type as a class with its own level of service priority.
  • cloaking - Cloaking is the masking of the sender's name and address in an e-mail note or distribution.
  • Clonezilla - Clonezilla is a free open source disk cloning application based on Debian.
  • Cluster Labs Pacemaker - Pacemaker is an open source high-availability cluster software developed from a collaboration between Red Hat and Novell.
  • codec - A codec is either a hardware device or a software-based process that compresses and decompresses large amounts of data used in voice over IP, video conferencing and streaming media.
  • collision - In a half duplex Ethernet network, a collision is the result of two devices on the same network attempting to transmit data at exactly the same time.
  • comfort noise generator (CNG) - A comfort noise generator (CNG) is a program used to generate background noise artificially for voice communications during periods of silence that occur during the course of conversation.
  • communication portal - A communication portal is a service that allows individuals, businesses, schools and government agencies to share information from diverse sources using unified communications (UC) media.
  • communications-enabled business processes (CEBP) - Communications-enabled business processes (CEBP) is the integration of communications capabilities into software-enabled business procedures, applications and technologies.
  • connection - In telecommunication and computing in general, a connection is the successful completion of necessary arrangements so that two or more parties (for example, people or programs) can communicate at a long distance.
  • connection broker - In desktop virtualization, a connection broker is a software program that allows the end-user to connect to an available desktop.
  • connection-oriented - In telecommunications, connection-oriented describes a means of transmitting data in which the devices at the end points use a preliminary protocol to establish an end-to-end connection before any data is sent.
  • connectionless - In telecommunication, connectionless describes communication between two network end points in which a message can be sent from one end point to another without prior arrangement.
  • corporate area network (CAN) - A corporate area network (CAN) is a separate, protected portion of a corporation's intranet.
  • CRAM (challenge-response authentication mechanism) - CRAM (challenge-response authentication mechanism) is the two-level scheme for authenticating network users that is used as part of the Web's Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP).
  • cross-bar switch - In a network, a cross-bar switch is a device that is capable of channeling data between any two devices that are attached to it up to its maximum number of ports.
  • cross-media queuing - In a call center, cross-media queuing describes the process of receiving and routing all incoming queries in the same way, whether the query comes in the form of a phone call, e-mail message, instant message, Web site submission, fax or interactive voice response (IVR) message.
  • CSMA/CA (Carrier Sense Multiple Access/Collision Avoidance) - CSMA/CA (Carrier Sense Multiple Access/Collision Avoidance) is a protocol for carrier transmission in 802.
  • cyclic redundancy checking - Cyclic redundancy checking is a method of checking for errors in data that has been transmitted on a communications link.
  • data availability - Data availability is a term used by some computer storage manufacturers and storage service providers (SSPs) to describe products and services that ensure that data continues to be available at a required level of performance in situations ranging from normal through "disastrous.
  • data center services - Data center services is a collective term for the supporting components necessary for the proper operation of a repository for storage, management and dissemination of data organized around a body of knowledge or pertaining to an enterprise.
  • data link control (DLC) - DLC also is an abbreviation for digital loop carrier.
  • data streaming - Data streaming is the continuous transfer of data at a steady, high-speed rate.
  • Data-Link layer - The data link layer is the protocol layer in a program that handles the moving of data into and out of a physical link in a network.
  • DCE (Distributed Computing Environment) - In network computing, DCE (Distributed Computing Environment) is an industry-standard software technology for setting up and managing computing and data exchange in a system of distributed computers.
  • deep packet inspection (DPI) - Deep packet inspection (DPI) is an advanced method of examining and managing network traffic.
  • desktop virtualization - Desktop virtualization is the concept of isolating a logical operating system instance from the client that is used to access it.
  • DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol) - DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol) is a network management protocol used to dynamically assign an Internet Protocol (IP) address to any device, or node, on a network so they can communicate using IP.
  • Differentiated Services (DiffServ, or DS) - Differentiated Services (DiffServ, or DS) is a protocol for specifying and controlling network traffic by class so that certain types of traffic get precedence - for example, voice traffic, which requires a relatively uninterrupted flow of data, might get precedence over other kinds of traffic.
  • Directory Services Restore Mode (DSRM) - Directory Services Restore Mode (DSRM) is a safe mode boot option for Windows Server domain controllers.
  • Distributed Control Plane Architecture (DCPA) - A Distributed Control Plane Architecture (DCPA) is a network architecture that makes it possible to allocate control protocol functions across multiple processor levels in the network system.
  • distributed file system (DFS) - A distributed file system is a client/server-based application that allows clients to access and process data stored on the server as if it were on their own computer.
  • distributive numerical control (DNC) - Distributive numerical control (DNC) is a technology that allows a single computer to be networked with one or more machines that use computer numerical control (CNC).
  • domain controller - Primary domain controller (PDC) and backup domain controller (BDC) are roles that can be assigned to a server in a network of computers that use the Windows NT operating system.
  • DSC pull server - A DSC pull server (desired state configuration pull server) is an automation server that allows configurations to be maintained on many servers, computer workstations and devices across a network.
  • DSML (Directory Services Markup Language) - DSML (Directory Services Markup Language) is an application of the Extensible Markup Language (XML) that enables different computer network directory formats to be expressed in a common format and shared by different directory systems.
  • dumb network - A dumb network is one that provides the physical interconnection between nodes but not much processing to support signaling.
  • DVMRP (Distance Vector Multicast Routing Protocol) - DVMRP (Distance Vector Multicast Routing Protocol) is the oldest routing protocol that has been used to support multicast data transmission over networks.
  • dynamic DNS service - A dynamic DNS (domain name system) service is a company that charges a small fee to allow a user connecting to the Internet with a dynamic IP address to be able to use applications that require a static IP address.
  • dynamic multi-pathing (DMP) - Dynamic multi-pathing (DMP) is a type of communication path control software application.
  • ECC (error correction code or error checking and correcting) - ECC (either "error correction [or correcting] code" or "error checking and correcting") allows data that is being read or transmitted to be checked for errors and, when necessary, corrected on the fly.
  • EIGRP (Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol) - EIGRP (Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol) is a network protocol that lets routers exchange information more efficiently than with earlier network protocols.
  • encoding and decoding - Encoding is the process of putting a sequence of characters (letters, numbers, punctuation, and certain symbols) into a specialized digital format for efficient transmission or transfer.
  • endpoint security (endpoint security management) - Endpoint security is an approach to network protection that requires each computing device on a corporate network to comply with certain standards before network access is granted.
  • Enterprise Identity Mapping (EIM) - Enterprise Identity Mapping (EIM) is an open architecture from IBM for helping an enterprise manage the multiple user registries and identities that enable a computer user to access multiple applications with a single sign-on.

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