Browse Definitions :

Network software

Terms related to network software, including definitions about network monitoring and words and phrases about network administration.

NDM - SEC

  • NDMP (Network Data Management Protocol) - NDMP (Network Data Management Protocol) is an open protocol used to control data backup and recovery communications between primary and secondary storage in a heterogeneous network environment.
  • NetBEUI (NetBIOS Extended User Interface) - NetBEUI (NetBIOS Extended User Interface) is a new, extended version of NetBIOS, the program that lets computers communicate within a local area network.
  • NetBIOS (Network Basic Input/Output System) - NetBIOS (Network Basic Input/Output System) is a program that allows applications on different computers to communicate within a local area network (LAN).
  • netfilter - Netfilter is a utility in Linux 2.
  • network access server (NAS) - A network access server (NAS) is a computer server that enables an independent service provider (ISP) to provide connected customers with Internet access.
  • network configuration management (NCM) - Network configuration management is the process of organizing and maintaining information about all of the components in a computer network.
  • Network File System (NFS) - The Network File System (NFS) is a client/server application that lets a computer user view and optionally store and update files on a remote computer as though they were on the user's own computer.
  • network hypervisor - A network hypervisor is a program that provides an abstraction layer for network hardware.
  • network intelligence (NI) - Network Intelligence (NI) is the capacity of a network to examine data packets continuously and in real time.
  • Network Job Entry (NJE) - Network Job Entry (NJE) is an application designed for the transfer of commands, messages, programs, and jobs among different computing systems in a network.
  • network monitoring - Network monitoring is the practice of consistently overseeing a computer network for any failures or deficiencies to ensure continued network performance.
  • Network Node Manager i (NNMi) - The Network Node Manager i (NNMi) is a program that helps a network administrator view and manage the conditions in a computer network.
  • network operating system (NOS) - A network operating system (NOS) is a computer operating system (OS) that is designed primarily to support workstations, personal computers and, in some instances, older terminals that are connected on a local area network (LAN).
  • network packet - A packet is the unit of data that is routed between an origin and a destination on the Internet or any other packet-switched network.
  • Network Service Access Point (NSAP) - The Network Service Access Point (NSAP) is one of two types of hierarchical addresses (the other type is the network entity title) used to implement Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) network layer addressing.
  • network service provider (NSP) - A network service provider (NSP) is a company that owns, operates and sells access to internet backbone infrastructure and services.
  • network socket - Sockets are created and used with a set of programming requests or "function calls" sometimes called the sockets application programming interface (API).
  • network tracking tool (network device management program) - A network tracking tool, also called a network device management program, is a program that helps a network administrator keep track of moves, additions, and changes (known as MACs) to the hardware infrastructure of a network.
  • network-attached storage (NAS) - Network-attached storage (NAS) is dedicated file storage that enables multiple users and heterogeneous client devices to retrieve data from centralized disk capacity.
  • Next Hop Resolution Protocol (NHRP) - In a computer network, the Next Hop Resolution Protocol (NHRP) is a protocol or method that can be used so that a computer sending data to another computer can learn the most direct route (the fewest number of hops) to the receiving computer.
  • NIC handle (Network Information Center handle) - A NIC (Network Information Center) handle is an alphanumeric character sequence that is unique for each entry in the database of all Internet domain name registrants.
  • NNTP (Network News Transfer Protocol) - NNTP (Network News Transfer Protocol) is the predominant protocol used by computer clients and servers for managing the notes posted on Usenet newsgroups.
  • northbound interface / southbound interface - A northbound interface is an interface that allows a particular component of a network to communicate with a higher-level component.
  • NOX - NOX is an open source development platform for C++-based software-defined networking (SDN) control applications.
  • nslookup - nslookup is the name of a program that lets an Internet server administrator or any computer user enter a host name (for example, "whatis.
  • NVGRE (Network Virtualization using Generic Routing Encapsulation) - NVGRE (Network Virtualization using Generic Routing Encapsulation) is a network virtualization method that uses encapsulation to create large numbers of virtual LANs (VLANs) for subnets that can extend across dispersed data centers and Layers 2 and 3.
  • ODIN (Open Data Center with an Interoperable Network) - ODIN (Open Data Center with an Interoperable Network) is a reference architecture that describes best practices for creating a flat, converged, virtualized data center fabric based on open industry standards.
  • one-armed router - A one-armed router is a router that routes traffic between virtual local area networks (VLANs).
  • Open Networking Foundation (ONF) - The Open Networking Foundation (ONF) is a consortium dedicated to the development and standardization of software-defined networking (SDN).
  • OpenFlow - OpenFlow is a protocol that allows a server to tell network switches where to send packets.
  • OpenFlow Consortium - The OpenFlow Consortium was a collaborative group of university researchers and network administrators that developed the original specification for the OpenFlow protocol.
  • OpenFlow controller - An OpenFlow controller is an application that manages flow control in a software-defined networking (SDN) environment.
  • OpenFlow switch - An OpenFlow switch is a software program or hardware device that forwards packets in a software-defined networking (SDN) environment.
  • OpenNMS (Open Network Management System) - OpenNMS (Open Network Management System) is the first enterprise-grade network management platform developed under the open source model.
  • OpenStack Neutron (formerly called Quantum) - OpenStack Neutron is a cloud networking controller and a networking-as-a-service project within the OpenStack cloud computing initiative.
  • OpenVPN (open source virtual private network) - OpenVPN is an open source virtual private network (VPN) product that offers simplified security, a modular network design and cross-platform portability.
  • operational support system (OSS) - An operational support system (OSS) is a set of programs that help a communications service provider monitor, control, analyze and manage a telephone or computer network.
  • packet mangling - Packet mangling is the modification of packets at a packet-based network interface before and/or after routing.
  • packet-switched - Packet-switched describes the type of network in which relatively small units of data called packets are routed through a network based on the destination address contained within each packet.
  • PacketHound - PacketHound is a product that aims to help an enterprise regulate traffic that might otherwise slow services down for all users of a local area network.
  • PAIR (Policy Analysis of Internet Routing) - The Policy Analysis of Internet Routing (PAIR) project is a Merit Network initiative dedicated to developing tools that Internet service providers (ISPs), network operators, and end users can use to troubleshoot Internet routing and policy problems.
  • Path Computation Element (PCE) - Path Computation Element (PCE) is a network component, application or node that can apply computational constraints and compute a network path or route based on a network graph.
  • pathing (path control) - Pathing (sometimes called path control) is a networking approach used to address the specific needs of storage networks (as compared to ordinary message networks) by changing the way that communication paths are managed and organized.
  • peer-to-peer (P2P) - Peer-to-peer (P2P) is a decentralized communications model in which each party has the same capabilities and either party can initiate a communication session.
  • personal area network (PAN) - A personal area network (PAN) is the interconnection of information technology devices within the range of an individual person, typically within a range of 10 meters.
  • ping - Ping is a basic Internet program that allows a user to verify that a particular IP address exists and can accept requests.
  • ping sweep (ICMP sweep) - A ping sweep (also known as an ICMP sweep) is a basic network scanning technique used to determine which of a range of IP addresses map to live hosts (computers).
  • Plexxi - Plexxi is a Cambridge Massachusetts company that makes software-defined networking (SDN) software.
  • Point-to-Point Tunneling Protocol (PPTP) - Point-to-Point Tunneling Protocol (PPTP) is a protocol (set of communication rules) that allows corporations to extend their own corporate network through private "tunnels" over the public Internet.
  • poison reverse - In a computer network that uses the Routing Information Protocol (RIP) or other distance vector routing protocols, a poison reverse is a way in which a gateway node tells its neighbor gateways that one of the gateways is no longer connected.
  • policy - In policy-based networking, a policy is a formal set of statements that define how the network's resources are to be allocated among its clients.
  • Policy and Charging Rules Function (PCRF) - Policy and Charging Rules Function (PCRF) is the part of the Evolved Packet Core (EPC) that supports service data flow detection, policy enforcement and flow-based charging.
  • policy server - A policy server is a security component of a policy-based network that provides authorization services and facilitates tracking and control of files.
  • policy-based management - Policy-based management is an administrative approach that is used to simplify the management of a given endeavor by establishing policies to deal with situations that are likely to occur.
  • policy-based networking - Policy-based networking is the management of a network so that various kinds of traffic - data, voice, and video - get the priority of availability and bandwidth needed to serve the network's users effectively.
  • polling - In electronic communication, 'polling' is the continuous checking of other programs or devices by one progam or device to see what state they are in, usually to see whether they are still connected or want to communicate.
  • port mirroring (roving analysis port) - Port mirroring is an approach to monitoring network traffic that involves forwarding a copy of each packet from one network switch port to another.
  • POX - POX is an open source development platform for Python-based software-defined networking (SDN) control applications, such as OpenFlow SDN controllers.
  • presence technology - Presence technology is a type of application that makes it possible to locate and identify a computing device wherever it might be, as soon as the user connects to the network.
  • principle of least privilege (POLP) - The principle of least privilege (POLP), an important concept in computer security, is the practice of limiting access rights for users to the bare minimum permissions they need to perform their work.
  • proxy server - A proxy server is a dedicated computer or a software system running on a computer that acts as an intermediary between an endpoint device, such as a computer, and another server from which a user or client is requesting a service.
  • pumpKIN - PumpKIN is a free, open source application that is used for exchange of data using the Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP).
  • push (or server-push) - Push (or "server-push") is the delivery of information on the Web that is initiated by the information server rather than by the information user or client, as it usually is.
  • QoS (quality of service) - Quality of service (QoS) refers to any technology that manages data traffic to reduce packet loss, latency and jitter on the network.
  • Quagga - Quagga is an open source suite of applications for the management of routing protocols.
  • R-value - R-value is a number, or score, that is used to quantitatively express the subjective quality of speech in communications systems, especially digital networks that carry voice over IP (VoIP) traffic, or for which VoIP service is under consideration.
  • race condition - A race condition is an undesirable situation that occurs when a device or system attempts to perform two or more operations at the same time, but because of the nature of the device or system, the operations must be done in the proper sequence to be done correctly.
  • RADIUS (Remote Authentication Dial-In User Service) - Remote Authentication Dial-In User Service (RADIUS) is a client/server protocol and software that enables remote access servers to communicate with a central server to authenticate dial-in users and authorize their access to the requested system or service.
  • real-time monitoring - Real-time (data) monitoring is the delivery of continuously updated information streaming at zero or low latency.
  • Real-Time Transport Protocol (RTP) - The Real-Time Transport Protocol (RTP) is an Internet protocol standard that specifies a way for programs to manage the real-time transmission of multimedia data over either unicast or multicast network services.
  • registration, admission, and status (RAS) - Registration, admission, and status (RAS) is a component of a network protocol that involves the addition of (or refusal to add) new authorized users, the admission of (or refusal to admit) authorized users based on available bandwidth, and the tracking of the status of all users.
  • Reliability, Availability and Serviceability (RAS) - Reliability, Availability and Serviceability (RAS) is a set of related attributes that must be considered when designing, manufacturing, purchasing or using a computer product or component.
  • remote access - Remote access is the ability for an authorized person to access a computer or a network from a geographical distance through a network connection.
  • remote desktop - Remote desktop is a program or an operating system feature that allows a user to connect to a computer in another location, see that computer's desktop and interact with it as if it were local.
  • Remote Installation Service (RIS) - Remote Installation Service (RIS) is a feature included in Microsoft's Windows 2000 server that allows network administrators to install the Windows 2000 Professional operating system and its upgrades to any number of client computers at one time from a centralized location.
  • Remote Network Access Application (RNAAPP) - RNAAPP (Remote Network Access Application) is one of those occasionally visible yet mysterious little programs that come with the Microsoft Windows 95/98 operating system.
  • Remote Procedure Call (RPC) - Remote Procedure Call (RPC) is a protocol that one program can use to request a service from a program located in another computer on a network without having to understand the network's details.
  • remote wakeup (RWU) - Remote wakeup (RWU) is a general term for the powering-up of (turning on) a computer over a network.
  • remote-control software - Remote-control software is programming in a central or server computer that is used to control other computers (or their users) at a distance, either under the control of an administrator or at the request of the user.
  • Resilient Packet Ring (RPR) - Resilient Packet Ring (RPR) is a network topology being developed as a new standard for fiber optic rings.
  • responsibility - In an Oracle environment, a responsibility is a defined user right, similar to the word privilege in some other settings.
  • reverse DNS (rDNS) - Reverse DNS (rDNS) is a method of resolving an IP address into a domain name, just as the domain name system (DNS) resolves domain names into associated IP addresses.
  • rich client - A rich client is a networked computer that has some resources installed locally but also depends on other resources distributed over the network.
  • RMM software (remote monitoring and management software) - RMM software (remote monitoring and management software) is a type of application that IT service providers use to maintain their clients' IT infrastructure and systems.
  • route poisoning - Route poisoning is a method of preventing a network from sending packets through a route that has become invalid.
  • Routing Information Protocol (RIP) - Routing Information Protocol (RIP) is a distance vector protocol that uses hop count as its primary metric.
  • routing table - A routing table is a set of rules, often viewed in table format, that is used to determine where data packets traveling over an Internet Protocol (IP) network will be directed.
  • RSAT (Microsoft Remote Server Administration Tools) - RSAT (Remote Server Administration Tools) is a feature that began in Windows Server 2008 R2 to help admins remotely manage computers running Windows Server.
  • RSVP (Resource Reservation Protocol) - RSVP (Resource Reservation Protocol) is a set of communication rules that allows channels or paths on the Internet to be reserved for the multicast (one source to many receivers) transmission of video and other high-bandwidth messages.
  • run book - In a computer system or network, a run book is a written set of procedures for the routine and exceptional operation of the system or network by an administrator or operator.
  • running disparity (RD) - Running disparity (RD or rd) is the difference between the number of logic 1 bits and logic 0 bits between the start of a data sequence and a particular instant in time during its transmission.
  • SAN file system - A SAN file system (that is, a storage area network file system) is programming that enables the sharing of the same copies of files stored on common storage media among multiple servers that may have different operating systems.
  • SAN routing - SAN (storage area network) routing is a technology used for interconnecting SAN islands (separately designated logical portions of a storage area network) within a larger network.
  • SD-WAN (Software-defined WAN) - Software-defined WAN (SD-WAN) is technology that uses software-defined networking (SDN) concepts to distribute network traffic across a wide area network (WAN).
  • SDDC (software-defined data center) - An SDDC (software-defined data center) is a data storage facility in which networking, storage, CPU and security are virtualized and delivered as a service.
  • SDLC (Synchronous Data Link Control) - (SDLC is also an abbreviation for systems development life cycle.
  • SDN application (software-defined networking application) - An SDN application is a software program designed to perform a task in a software-defined networking (SDN) environment.
  • SDN controller (software-defined networking controller) - An SDN controller is an application in a software-defined networking (SDN) architecture that manages flow control for improved network management and application performance.

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