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Networking and communications

Terms related to networking and communications, including definitions about network protocols and words and phrases about data transmission.

100 - EBI

  • 100 Gigabit Ethernet (100GbE) - 100 Gigabit Ethernet (100GbE) is a standard in development that will enable the transfer of Ethernet frames at 100 gigabits per second (gp/s).
  • 10BASE-36 - 10BASE-36 is a type of physical cabling defined in the IEEE 802.
  • 10BASE-T - 10BASE-T, one of several physical media specified in the IEEE 802.
  • 2600 - 2600 is the frequency in hertz (cycles per second) that AT&T formerly put as a steady signal on any long-distance telephone line that was not currently in use.
  • 3GPP (3rd Generation Partnership Project) - The 3rd Generation Partnership Project (3GPP) is a collaborative project between a group of telecommunications associations with the initial goal of developing globally applicable specifications for third-generation (3G) mobile systems.
  • 40 Gigabit Ethernet (40GbE) - 40 Gigabit Ethernet (40GbE) is a standard that enables the transfer of Ethernet frames at speeds of up to 40 gigabits per second (Gbps).
  • 5G new radio (NR) - 5G new radio (5G NR) is a set of standards that replaces the LTE 4G wireless network communications standard.
  • 802.11h - The 802.11h specification is an addition to the 802.
  • 802.11u - 802.11u is an amendment to the IEEE 802.
  • AAAA resource record - An AAAA resource record is a record that stores a single IPv6 address.
  • access - Access is simply being able to get to what you need.
  • access layer - The access layer is where host computers and end users connect to the network.
  • access network - An access network is a user network that connects subscribers to a particular service provider and, through the carrier network, to other networks such as the Internet.
  • Access Network Query Protocol (ANQP) - The Access Network Query Protocol (ANQP) is a query and response protocol that defines services offered by an access point (AP), typically at a Wi-Fi hot spot.
  • acoustical mesh network - An acoustical mesh network is a decentralized communication system that transmits data by using sound to connect computers.
  • addressability - Addressability is the capacity for an entity to be targeted and found.
  • ADSL (Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line) - ADSL (Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line) is a technology that facilitates fast data transmission at a high bandwidth on existing copper wire telephone lines to homes and businesses.
  • Advanced Message Queuing Protocol (AMQP) - Advanced Message Queuing Protocol (AMQP) is an open source published standard for asynchronous messaging by wire.
  • Aloha (Aloha method) - Aloha, also called the Aloha method, refers toa simple communications scheme in which each source (transmitter) in a network sends data wheneverthere is a frame to send.
  • alternate data stream (ADS) - An alternate data stream (ADS) is a feature of Windows New Technology File System (NTFS) that contains metadata for locating a specific file by author or title.
  • Amazon Silk - Silk is the browser that Amazon developed for the Kindle Fire tablet computer.
  • Anonymous - Anonymous is a loosely organized hacktivist collective created to promote free speech, unimpeded access to information, and transparency in government and corporate activities.
  • application awareness - Application awareness is the capacity of a system to maintain information about connected applications to optimize their operation and that of any subsystems that they run or control.
  • application-aware networking (app-ware networking) - Application-aware networking is the capacity of an intelligent network to maintain current information about applications that connect to it and, as a result, optimize their functioning as well as that of other applications or systems that they control.
  • ARM server - An advanced RISC machine (ARM) server is an enterprise-class computer server that employs a large array of ARM processors rather than a complement of x86-class processors.
  • auto attendant (automated attendant) - An automated attendant (AA) is a telephony system that transfers incoming calls to various extensions as specified by callers, without the intervention of a human operator.
  • bandwidth (network bandwidth) - Network bandwidth is a measurement indicating the maximum capacity of a wired or wireless communications link to transmit data over a network connection in a given amount of time.
  • base station - In telecommunications, a base station is a fixed transceiver that is the main communication point for one or more wireless mobile client devices.
  • baseband unit (BBU) - A baseband unit (BBU) is a device that interprets baseband frequencies in telecom systems including computer networks, the internet, phone networks and radio broadcasting systems.
  • beamforming - Beamforming is a type of radio frequency (RF) management in which a wireless signal is directed toward a specific receiving device.
  • bits per second (bps or bit/sec) - In data communications, bits per second (bps or bit/sec) is a common measure of data speed for computer modems and transmission carriers.
  • Blue Cloud - Blue Cloud is an approach to shared infrastructure developed by IBM.
  • bogon - A bogon is an illegitimate IP address that falls into a set of IP addresses that have not been officially assigned to an entity by an internet registration institute, such as the Internet Assigned Number Authority (IANA).
  • BOINC (Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing) - BOINC (Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing) is a distributed computing infrastructure based on a centralized server and volunteer computer resources.
  • BOOTP (Bootstrap Protocol) - BOOTP (Bootstrap Protocol) is an internet protocol that lets a network user automatically be configured to receive an IP address and have an operating system booted without user involvement.
  • Broadband Technology Opportunities Program (BTOP) - The Broadband Technology Opportunities Program (BTOP) is an initiative within the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) created to promote the development and adoption of broadband throughout the United States, particularly in unserved and underserved areas.
  • burstiness - Burstiness is an intermittent type of data transmission.
  • cable head-end - A cable head-end (or headend) is the facility at a local cable TV office that originates and communicates cable TV services and cable modem services to subscribers.
  • cable modem termination system (CMTS) - A cable modem termination system (CMTS) is a component that exchanges digital signals with cable modems on a cable network.
  • campus network - A campus network is a proprietary local area network (LAN) or set of interconnected LANs serving a corporation, government agency, university, or similar organization.
  • canonical name - A canonical name is the properly denoted host name of a computer or network server.
  • carrier network - A telecommunications carrier network is the collection of devices and underlying infrastructure used to transmit data from one location to another.
  • CCMP (Counter Mode with Cipher Block Chaining Message Authentication Code Protocol) - Counter Mode with Cipher Block Chaining Message Authentication Code Protocol (CCMP) is an encryption protocol that forms part of the 802.
  • CCNA certification - Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA) is a technical certification that Cisco offers for early-career networking professionals.
  • CHAP (Challenge-Handshake Authentication Protocol) - CHAP (Challenge-Handshake Authentication Protocol) is a more secure procedure for connecting to a system than the Password Authentication Procedure (PAP).
  • chatty protocol - A chatty protocol is an application or routing protocol that requires a client or server to wait for an acknowledgement before it can transmit again.
  • checkpoint - A checkpoint, in a virtualization context, is a snapshot of the state of a virtual machine.
  • Chrome Remote Desktop - Chrome Remote Desktop is an extension of the Google Chrome browser that allows a user to remotely see and control another user's desktop through the browser window.
  • churn rate - Churn rate is a measure of the number of customers or employees who leave a company during a given period.
  • Cisco Borderless Networks - Cisco Borderless Networks is the brand name for a set of hardware and software technologies which allow "anyone, anywhere, anytime, and on any device" to connect to an organization's network.
  • Cisco Certified Internetwork Expert (CCIE certification) - Cisco Certified Internetwork Expert (CCIE certification) is a series of technical certifications for senior networking professionals who design, build, implement, maintain and troubleshoot complex enterprise networking infrastructures.
  • Cisco Certified Network Professional (CCNP) - Cisco Certified Network Professional (CCNP) is an intermediate-level certification in the Cisco certified professional program.
  • Cisco Webex - Cisco Webex is a video conferencing and collaboration product suite.
  • CLEC (competitive local exchange carrier) - In the United States, a CLEC (competitive local exchange carrier) is a telephone company that competes with the already established local telephone business by providing its own network and switching.
  • click-to-talk (CTC) - Click-to-call (CTC), also called click-for-talk, is a technology that converts Web traffic into voice telephone connections using VoIP (Voice over IP).
  • client-server network - A client-server network is a communications model in which multiple client programs share the services of a common server program.
  • Clos network - A Clos network is a type of non-blocking, multistage switching architecture that reduces the number of ports required in an interconnected fabric.
  • cloud computing - Cloud computing is a general term for anything that involves delivering hosted services over the internet.
  • cloud radio access network (C-RAN) - C-RAN, or cloud radio access network, is a centralized, cloud computing-based architecture for radio access networks (RAN) that enables large-scale deployment, collaborative radio technology support and real time virtualization capabilities.
  • cloud storage API - A cloud storage API is an application program interface that connects a locally-based application to a cloud-based storage system, so that a user can send data to it and access and work with data stored in it.
  • cloud storage gateway - A cloud storage gateway is a hardware- or software-based appliance that serves as a bridge between local applications and remote cloud-based storage.
  • cloud telephony (cloud calling) - Cloud telephony, also known as cloud calling, is a type of unified communications as a service (UCaaS) that offers voice communication services through a third-party host.
  • cloud-oriented architecture (COA) - A cloud-oriented architecture (COA) is a conceptual model encompassing all elements in a cloud environment.
  • CNAME - A CNAME specifies an alias or nickname for a canonical name record in a domain name system (DNS) database.
  • common carrier - A common carrier, in telecommunications, is an entity that provides wired and wireless communication services to the general public for a fee.
  • communication portal - A communication portal is a service that allows individuals, businesses, schools and government agencies to share information from diverse sources using unified communications (UC) media.
  • Communications as a Service (CaaS) - Communications as a Service (CaaS) is an outsourced enterprise communications solution that can be leased from a single vendor.
  • communications platform as a service (CPaaS) - Communications platform as a service (CPaaS) is a cloud-based delivery model that allows organizations to add real-time communication capabilities, such as voice, video and messaging, to business applications by deploying application program interfaces (APIs).
  • communications-enabled business processes (CEBP) - Communications-enabled business processes (CEBP) is the integration of communications capabilities into software-enabled business procedures, applications and technologies.
  • control plane (CP) - The control plane is the part of a network that carries signaling traffic and is responsible for routing.
  • converged network adapter (CNA) - A converged network adapter (CNA) is a single network interface card (NIC) that contains both a Fibre Channel (FC) host bus adapter (HBA) and a TCP/IP Ethernet NIC.
  • CPE device - A CPE device is telecommunications hardware located at the home or business of a customer.
  • CrackBerry - CrackBerry is a nickname for the BlackBerry handheld device.
  • CubeSat - A CubeSat is a small, low-cost, cube-shaped research satellite.
  • dark infrastructure - Dark infrastructure is undocumented but active software or services whose existence and function is unknown to system administrators -- despite the fact that it may be integral to the continued operation of documented infrastructure.
  • data plan (mobile data plan) - Since the advent of the smartphone made mobile Internet possible, most carriers offer data plans at varying rates based on the amount of data transfer allowed before a data cap is imposed.
  • data plane (DP) - The data plane (sometimes known as the user plane, forwarding plane, carrier plane or bearer plane) is the part of a network that carries user traffic.
  • dead zone (Wi-Fi dead zone) - A dead zone (Wi-Fi dead zone) is an area within a wireless LAN location where Wi-Fi does not function, typically due to radio interference or range issues.
  • deep packet inspection (DPI) - Deep packet inspection (DPI) is an advanced method of examining and managing network traffic.
  • desktop virtualization - Desktop virtualization is the concept of isolating a logical operating system (OS) instance from the client that is used to access it.
  • directional antenna - A directional antenna is a radio-frequency (RF) wireless antenna designed to function more effectively in some directions than in others.
  • discrete event simulation (DES) - Discrete event simulation (DES) is the process of codifying the behavior of a complex system as an ordered sequence of well-defined events.
  • discrete multitone (DMT) - Discrete multitone (DMT) is a method of separating a Digital Subscriber Line (DSL) signal so that the usable frequency range is separated into 256 frequency bands (or channels) of 4.
  • disposable email - What is a disposable email?Disposable email is a service that allows a registered user to receive email at a temporary address that expires after a certain time period elapses.
  • Distributed Control Plane Architecture (DCPA) - A Distributed Control Plane Architecture (DCPA) is a network architecture that makes it possible to allocate control protocol functions across multiple processor levels in the network system.
  • DNS redirection - DNS redirection is the controversial practice of serving a Web page to a user that is different from either the one requested or one that might reasonably be expected, such as an error page.
  • DNS Security Extensions (DNSSEC) - DNS Security Extensions (DNSSEC) are a set of Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) standards created to address vulnerabilities in the Domain Name System (DNS) and protect it from online threats.
  • DOCSIS (Data Over Cable Service Interface Specifications) - Now known as CableLabs Certified Cable Modems, DOCSIS (Data Over Cable Service Interface Specifications) is a standard interface for cable modems, the devices that handle incoming and outgoing data signals between a cable TV operator and a personal or business computer or television set.
  • dynamic multipoint VPN (DMVPN) - A dynamic multipoint virtual private network (DMVPN) is a secure network that exchanges data between sites without needing to pass traffic through an organization's headquarter VPN server or router.
  • dynamic spectrum access (dynamic spectrum management) - Dynamic spectrum access (DSA), also referred to as dynamic spectrum management (DSM), is a set of spectrum utilization techniques that adjusts frequency in real time based on fluctuating circumstances.
  • e-prescribing (eRx) incentive program - The Electronic Prescribing (eRx) Incentive Program is a US government program that provides financial incentives to physicians, practitioners and therapists who meet certain criteria for the use of qualified e-prescribing systems.
  • E.164 - E.164 is an international numbering plan for public telephone systems in which each assigned number contains a country code (CC), a national destination code (NDC), and a subscriber number (SN).
  • east-west traffic - East-west traffic, in a networking context, is the transfer of data packets from server to server within a data center.
  • eavesdropping - Eavesdropping is the unauthorized real-time interception of a private communication, such as a phone call, instant message, videoconference or fax transmission.
  • EBIF (Enhanced TV Binary Interchange Format) - EBIF (Enhanced TV Binary Interchange Format) is a collection of signaling and messaging specifications that makes it possible for television program producers and advertisers to create and serve interactive multimedia content through a television's set-top box.
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    Change control is a systematic approach to managing all changes made to a product or system.

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    NOR flash memory is one of two types of non-volatile storage technologies.

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