Browse Definitions :

End user hardware

Terms related to peripheral devices including definitions about keyboards or mice and words and phrases about printers, monitors, digital cameras and scanners.

LAS - WXG

  • laser printer - A laser printer is a popular type of personal computer printer that uses a non-impact (keys don't strike the paper), photocopier technology.
  • LCD (Liquid Crystal Display) - LCD (Liquid Crystal Display) is a type of flat panel display which uses liquid crystals in its primary form of operation.
  • letterpress - Letterpress is the oldest form of printing.
  • light-emitting diode (LED) - A light-emitting diode (LED) is a semiconductor device that emits visible light when an electric current passes through it.
  • logical unit number (LUN) - A logical unit number (LUN) is a unique identifier for designating an individual or collection of physical or virtual storage devices that execute input/output (I/O) commands with a host computer, as defined by the Small System Computer Interface (SCSI) standard.
  • LPT (line print terminal) - LPT (line print terminal) is the usual designation for a parallel port connection to a printer or other device on a personal computer.
  • LTO (Linear Tape-Open) tape - LTO (Linear Tape-Open) tape is an open-format tape storage technology created by Hewlett-Packard (HP), International Business Machines (IBM) and Seagate Technology.
  • micro USB - Micro USB is a miniaturized version of the Universal Serial Bus (USB) interface developed for connecting compact and mobile devices such as smartphones, MP3 players and digital cameras.
  • micro-HDMI - Micro-HDMI (HDMI type D) is a miniaturized version of the High Definition Multimedia Interface specification.
  • modem lights (AA) - This page provides a description of the abbreviations and meanings of each of the lights that describe the "handshaking" between a computer modem and the UART chip in a computer.
  • monitor - In computers, a monitor is a computer display and related parts packaged in a physical unit that is separate from other parts of the computer.
  • mouse - A mouse is a small device that a computer user pushes across a desk surface in order to point to a place on a display screen and to select one or more actions to take from that position.
  • MRAM (magnetoresistive random access memory) - MRAM (magnetoresistive random access memory) is a way to store data bits using magnetic states instead of the electrical charges used by dynamic random access memory (DRAM).
  • MTBF (mean time between failures) - MTBF (mean time between failures) is a measure of how reliable a hardware product or component is.
  • multifunction peripheral (MFP) - A multifunction peripheral (MFP) is a device that performs a variety of functions that would otherwise be carried out by separate peripheral devices.
  • MultiMediaCard (MMC) - A MultiMediaCard (MMC) is a tiny memory card that uses flash memory to make storage portable among various devices, such as car navigation systems, cellular phones, eBooks, PDAs, smartphones, and digital cameras, music players, and video camcorders, and personal computers.
  • nearline storage - Nearline storage is the on-site storage of data on removable media.
  • nematic liquid crystal - A nematic liquid crystal is a transparent or translucent liquid that causes the polarization (that is, the focusing in a plane) of light waves to change as the waves pass through the liquid.
  • NOR flash memory - NOR flash memory is one of two types of non-volatile storage technologies.
  • NTFS (NT File System) - NTFS, which stands for 'NT file system' and the 'New Technology File System,' is the file system that the Windows NT operating system (OS) uses for storing and retrieving files on hard disk drives (HDDs) and solid-state drives (SSDs).
  • offset printing (offset lithography) - Offset printing, also called offset lithography, is a method of mass-production printing in which the images on metal plates are transferred (offset) to rubber blankets or rollers and then to the print media.
  • OLED (light-emitting diode) - OLED (organic light-emitting diode) is a display technology, pioneered and patented by Kodak, based on the use of organic polymer material as the semiconductor material in light-emitting diodes (LEDs).
  • optical disc - An optical disc is an electronic data storage medium that can be written to and read from using a low-powered laser beam.
  • optical storage - Optical storage is any storage type in which data is written and read with a laser.
  • page description language (PDL) - A page description language (PDL) specifies the arrangement of a printed page through commands from a computer that the printer carries out.
  • pathing (path control) - Pathing (sometimes called path control) is a networking approach used to address the specific needs of storage networks (as compared to ordinary message networks) by changing the way that communication paths are managed and organized.
  • Peripheral Component Interconnect Express (PCIe, PCI-E) - PCIe is a high-speed serial interconnection standard for connecting peripheral devices to a computer's motherboard.
  • personal area network (PAN) - A personal area network (PAN) is the interconnection of information technology devices within the range of an individual person, typically within a range of 10 meters.
  • PHOLED (phosphorescent organic light-emitting device) - PHOLED (phosphorescent organic light-emitting device) is a proprietary display technology developed by the Universal Display Corporation (UDC) that uses soluble phosphorescent small molecule materials to create organic light-emitting devices (OLED s).
  • plasma display - A plasma display is a computer video display in which each pixel on the screen is illuminated by a tiny bit of plasma or charged gas, somewhat like a tiny neon light.
  • Playstation - Playstation is a video game console developed by Sony.
  • plotter - A plotter is a printer that interprets commands from a computer to make line drawings on paper with one or more automated pens.
  • port - A port in computing has three main uses, each as a type of receptacle in networking, computer hardware and software.
  • power take-off (PTO) - Power take-off (PTO) is a device that transfers an engine’s mechanical power to another piece of equipment.
  • PPD file (Postscript Printer Description file) - A PPD (Postscript Printer Description) file is a file that describes the font s, paper sizes, resolution, and other capabilities that are standard for a particular Postscript printer.
  • print server - A print server is a software application, network device or computer that manages print requests and makes printer queue status information available to end users and network administrators.
  • printer - A printer is a device that accepts text and graphic output from a computer and transfers the information to paper, usually to standard-size, 8.
  • Printer Control Language (PCL) - Printer Control Language (PCL) is a language (essentially, a set of command code s) that enables applications to control HP DeskJet, LaserJet, and other HP printers.
  • PS/2 connector - A PS/2 connector is a round connector with six pins that some makes of personal computer use for the keyboard or mouse connection.
  • QWERTY keyboard - The QWERTY (pronounced KWEHR-tee) keyboard is the standard typewriter and computer keyboard in countries that use a Latin-based alphabet.
  • radio charging - Radio charging is a wireless charging method used to charge items with small batteries and low power requirements, such as watches, hearing aids and wireless keyboards and mice.
  • RAID (redundant array of independent disks) - RAID (redundant array of independent disks) is a way of storing the same data in different places on multiple hard disks or solid-state drives (SSDs) to protect data in the case of a drive failure.
  • Rankine cycle - The Rankine cycle is a method of providing power in a closed system where a fluid is evaporated to perform a task and re-condensed.
  • reconfigurable tactile display (RTD) - A reconfigurable tactile display (RTD) is a control interface that provides physical touch input, but that can be configured by programming.
  • Reduce, reuse, recycle (R3) - Reduce, reuse and recycle (R3) are the three essential components of environmentally-responsible consumer behavior.
  • refresh - In a computer display, to refresh is to redraw the image information from memory.
  • reprographics - Reprographics is a blanket term encompassing multiple methods of reproducing content, such as scanning, photography, xerography and digital printing.
  • resonance charging - Resonance charging is a wireless charging method for items that require large amounts of power, such as an electric car, robot, vacuum cleaner or laptop computer.
  • RS-232C - RS-232C is a long-established standard ("C" is the current version) that describes the physical interface and protocol for relatively low-speed serial data communication between computers and related devices.
  • scan set (scan code set) - The scan set, also called the scan code set, is a function that converts keyboard key closures to digital signals the computer interprets as alphanumeric characters and special symbols.
  • scanner - A scanner is a device that captures images from photographic prints, posters, magazine pages, and similar sources for computer editing and display.
  • screen - In a computer display, the screen is the physical surface on which visual information is presented.
  • SCSI (Small Computer System Interface) - Definition: The Small Computer System Interface (SCSI) is a set of parallel interface standards used to attach disk drives and other peripherals to a computer.
  • secondary storage - Secondary storage is persistent storage for noncritical data that doesn't need to be accessed as frequently as data in primary storage or that doesn't have the same performance or availability requirements.
  • Secure Digital card (SD card) - SD cards use flash memory to provide nonvolatile storage.
  • Serial ATA (Serial Advanced Technology Attachment or SATA) - Serial ATA (Serial Advanced Technology Attachment or SATA) is a command and transport protocol that defines how data is transferred between a computer's motherboard and mass storage devices, such as hard disk drives (HDDs), optical drives and solid-state drives (SSDs).
  • serial communications interface (SCI) - A serial communications interface (SCI) is a device that enables the serial (one bit at a time) exchange of data between a microprocessor and peripherals such as printers, external drives, scanners, or mice.
  • serial-attached SCSI (SAS) - Serial-attached SCSI (SAS) is a point-to-point protocol used to transfer digital data between servers and SAS storage devices.
  • SGI (Silicon Graphics) - SGI (Silicon Graphics) is a leading manufacturer of high-performance computing, data management, and visualization products.
  • sheet-fed offset printing - Sheet-fed offset printing is a method in which individual pages of paper are fed into the machine.
  • slot (or expansion slot) - In computers, a slot, or expansion slot, is an engineered technique for adding capability to a computer in the form of connection pinholes (typically, in the range of 16 to 64 closely-spaced holes) and a place to fit an expansion card containing the circuitry that provides some specialized capability, such as video acceleration, sound, or disk drive control.
  • SOLED (stacked organic light-emitting device) - SOLED (stacked organic light-emitting device) is a display technology from the Universal Display Corporation (UDC) that uses a stack of transparent organic light-emitting devices (TOLED s) to improve resolution and enhance full-color quality.
  • sound card - A sound card (also referred to as an audio card) is a peripheral device that attaches to the ISA or PCI slot on a motherboard to enable the computer to input, process, and deliver sound.
  • standby power - Standby power is electrical power that a device consumes when not in present use, but plugged in to a source of power and ready to be used.
  • storage (computer storage) - Data storage is the collective methods and technologies that capture and retain digital information on electromagnetic, optical or silicon-based storage media.
  • storage at the edge - Storage at the edge is the collective methods and technologies that capture and retain digital information at the periphery of the network, as close to the originating source as possible.
  • storage medium (storage media) - In computers, a storage medium is any technology -- including devices and materials -- used to place, keep and retrieve electronic data.
  • stress testing - Stress testing is the process of determining the ability of a computer, network, program or device to maintain a certain level of effectiveness under unfavorable conditions.
  • switch-on-a-chip (SOC) - A switch-on-a-chip (SOC) is a network - typically a storage network - switch (a device that channels incoming data flow from any of multiple input ports to the output port appropriate for its destination) that is built into a single microchip (integrated circuit).
  • tablet (tablet PC) - A tablet is a wireless, portable personal computer with a touchscreen interface.
  • tape backup - Tape can help fix an unstructured data backup issue and is a good archiving medium.
  • tape drive - A tape drive is a device that stores computer data on magnetic tape, especially for backup and archiving purposes.
  • teletypewriter (TTY) - A teletypewriter (TTY) is an input device that allows alphanumeric character to be typed in and sent, usually one at a time as they are typed, to a computer or a printer.
  • thermography - Thermography is a printing or imaging method.
  • Thunderbolt - Thunderbolt (code named "Light Peak") is a high-speed, bidirectional input/output (I/O) technology that can transfer data of all types on a single cable at speeds of up to 10 Gbps (billions of bits per second).
  • tiered storage - Tiered storage is a way to assign different categories of data to various types of storage media with the objective of reducing the total cost of storage.
  • TOLED (transparent organic light-emitting device) - TOLED (transparent organic light-emitting device) is a display technology being developed by the Universal Display Corporation (UDC) that uses transparent electrodes and light emitting materials in an organic light-emitting device (OLED).
  • touch pad (touchpad) - A touch pad is a device for pointing (controlling input positioning) on a computer display screen.
  • touch screen - A touch screen is a computer display screen that is also an input device.
  • trackball - A trackball is a computer cursor control device used in many notebook and laptop computers.
  • TrackPoint (pointing stick) - A TrackPoint, also called a pointing stick, is a cursor control device found in IBM ThinkPad notebook computers.
  • TWAIN - TWAIN is a widely-used program that lets you scan an image (using a scanner) directly into the application (such as PhotoShop) where you want to work with the image.
  • twisted nematic display (TN display) - A twisted nematic (TN) display is a common type of liquid-crystal display (LCD) that consists of a substance called a nematic liquid crystal that is confined between two plates of polarized glass.
  • two-spindle system (twin-spindle system) - A two-spindle system, also called a twin-spindle system, is a computer design with two internal storage drives.
  • UART (Universal Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitter) - A UART (Universal Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitter) is the microchip with programming that controls a computer's interface to its attached serial devices.
  • unified endpoint management (UEM) - Unified endpoint management (UEM) is an approach to securing and controlling desktop computers, laptops, smartphones and tablets in a connected, cohesive manner from a single console.
  • Universal Plug and Play (UPnP) - Universal Plug and Play (UPnP) is a standard that uses Internet and Web protocols to enable devices such as PCs, peripherals, intelligent appliances, and wireless devices to be plugged into a network and automatically know about each other.
  • USB 3.0 (SuperSpeed USB) - USB 3.0, also known as SuperSpeed USB, is the next major revision of the Universal Serial Bus (USB).
  • USB flash drive - A USB flash drive -- also known as a stick, thumb or pen drive -- is a plug-and-play portable storage device that uses flash memory and can attach to a keychain.
  • USB-C (USB Type C) - USB-C is a connection type standard designed to replace all USB types on the computer and device ends of future USB with a single reversible connector.
  • UXGA (Ultra Extended Graphics Array) - UXGA (Ultra Extended Graphics Array) is a display modein which the resolutionis 1600 pixels horizontally by 1200 pixels vertically (1600 x 1200).
  • VCD (video CD or video compact disc) - VCD (also called video CD, video compact disc or "disc") is a compact diskformat based on CD-ROM XAthat is specifically designed to hold MPEG-1video data and to include interactive capabilities.
  • video card (graphics card) - A video adapter (alternate terms include graphics card, display adapter, video card, video board and almost any combination of the words in these terms) is an integrated circuit card in a computer or, in some cases, a monitor that provides digital-to-analog conversion, video RAM, and a video controller so that data can be sent to a computer's display.
  • virtual keyboard - A virtual keyboard is a computer keyboard that a user operates by typing on or within a wireless- or optical-detectable surface or area rather than by depressing physical keys.
  • virtual storage area network (VSAN) - A virtual storage area network (VSAN) is a logical partition in a physical storage area network (SAN).
  • What is failover? - Failover is a backup operational mode in which the functions of a system component (such as a processor, server, network, or database, for example) are assumed by secondary system components when the primary component becomes unavailable through either failure or scheduled down time.
  • Windows key (Winkey) - The Windows key (Winkey) is a relatively new keyboard key sporting a specially-designed Microsoft Windows logo.
  • WORM (write once, read many) - In computer storage media, WORM (write once, read many) is a data storage technology that allows information to be written to a disc a single time and prevents the drive from erasing the data.
  • WXGA - WXGA, which stands for wide XGA, is a term used in product specifications to describe a display screen that is appropriate for business but is also suitable for watching DVDs.
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    Optical storage is any storage type in which data is written and read with a laser.

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    JBOD, which stands for 'just a bunch of disks,' is a type of multilevel configuration for disks.

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