Browse Definitions :

Personal computing

Terms related to personal computers, including definitions about computers sold as consumer products and words and phrases about laptops, tablets and smartphones.

2D - CYB

  • 2D barcode (two-dimensional barcode) - A 2D (two-dimensional) barcode is a graphical image that stores information both horizontally -- as one-dimensional bar codes do -- and vertically.
  • 3-D scanner - A 3-D scanner is an imaging device that collects distance point measurements from a real-world object and translates them into a virtual 3-D object.
  • 3270 (Information Display System) - The 3270 Information Display System, a product from IBM, was, prior to the arrival of the PC, the way that almost the entire corporate world interfaced with a computer.
  • 360-degree photograph - 360-degree photos simulate being in the shoes of a photographer and looking around to the left, right, up and down as desired as well as sometimes zooming.
  • 360-degree VR (360-degree virtual reality) - 360-degree VR (360-degree virtual reality) is an audiovisual simulation of an altered, augmented or substituted environment that surrounds the user, allowing them to look around them in all directions, just as they can in real life.
  • 3D audio (three-dimensional audio) - 3D audio is a simulation of the natural positioning of sounds for various applications including video presentations and games, virtual environments and sound stages.
  • 3D gaming - 3D gaming is interactive computer entertainment that is graphically presented in the three dimensions of height, width and depth; the addition of depth to 2D gaming enabled the exploration of virtual worlds with more realistic representation.
  • 3D mouse - A 3D mouse is a pointing and control device specialized for movement in virtual 3D (three-dimensional) environments.
  • 404 error page - A 404 page is the webpage served to a user who tries to access a page that is unavailable.
  • accelerometer - An accelerometer is a device that measures changes in gravitational acceleration in a device it may be installed in.
  • active man-in-the-middle attack (MitM) - Active man-in-the-middle (MitM) is an attack method that allows an intruder to access sensitive information by intercepting and altering communications between the user of a public network and a requested website.
  • ad blocker - An ad blocker is a software product that prevents advertisements from appearing with the content the user is intentionally viewing.
  • adulting - Adulting is the assumption of tasks and behaviors associated with normal grown-up life, along with the implication that the individual in question does not particularly identify as an adult.
  • AI hearing aid - An AI hearing aid is a wearable device that can incorporate capabilities such as fitness tracking, audio streaming and translation in addition to the conventional function of enhancing sound for the user.
  • Alexa Voice Services (AVS) - Alexa Voice Service (AVS) is Amazon's suite of services built around its voice-controlled AI assistant for the home or other environments.
  • Amazon - Amazon is the world’s largest online retailer.
  • Amazon Prime Air drone - Amazon's Prime Air drone is a delivery system in development that uses remote-controlled robotic vehicles to transport goods from the warehouse to the consumer.
  • ambient intelligence (AmI) - Ambient intelligence (AmI) is the element of a pervasive computing environment that enables it to interact with and respond appropriately to the humans in that environment.
  • ambient temperature - Ambient temperature is the air temperature of any object or environment where equipment is stored.
  • Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich (ICS) - Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich (ICS) is a version of Google’s mobile operating system.
  • Android Factory Reset - Android Factory Reset is a feature that erases all device settings, user data, third-party applications, and associated application data from an Android device’s internal flash storage to return the device to the condition it was in when shipped from the factory.
  • app - App is an abbreviated form of the word "application.
  • Apple iPad Pro - Apple iPad Pro is the company's large, powerful, high-resolution tablet, aimed at users who require graphics-heavy applications and a PC-like screen and interface.
  • Apple Watch OS (Apple Watch operating system) - The operating system for Apple Watch is designed to take advantage of the wearable nature of the device with features such as Glances that cater to the smaller screen and its location on the user's wrist.
  • appliance (network appliance) - An appliance or "network appliance" is a term used to denote a relatively low-cost PC designed for Internet access and specialized business use, but without the capabilities of a fully-equipped PC.
  • areal density - Areal density measures the amount of data that can be stored on a given amount of physical space on a disk drive.
  • artificial personality (AP) - An artificial personality (AP) is a collection of characteristics, tendencies and behavioral quirks assigned to a chatbot, digital assistant, robot or video game character.
  • ASCII (American Standard Code for Information Interchange) - ASCII (American Standard Code for Information Interchange) is the most common character encoding format for text data in computers and on the internet.
  • attention economy - The attention economy is the collective human capacity to engage with the many elements in our environments that demand mental focus.
  • attention management - Attention management is an area of endeavor seeking to optimize the way people allocate their limited capacity for focused mental engagement.
  • ATX - ATX is an industry-wide specification for a desktop computer's motherboard.
  • audio - Audio is sound within the acoustic range available to humans.
  • augmented reality (AR) - Augmented reality (AR) is the integration of digital information with live video or the user's environment in real time.
  • augmented reality app (AR app) - An augmented reality app (AR app) is a software application that integrates digital visual content (and sometimes audio and other types) into the user’s real-world environment.
  • augmented reality gaming (AR gaming) - Unlike virtual reality gaming, which often requires a separate room or confined area to create an immersive environment, augmented reality gaming uses the existing environment and creates a playing field within it.
  • auto-correct - Auto-correct is a type of software program that identifies misspelled words, uses algorithms to identify the word most likely to have been intended, and edits the text accordingly.
  • autoplay video - Autoplay video is audiovisual content that starts automatically when someone goes to the host web page.
  • backslash - The backslash ( \ ) is a typographic and/or keyboard mark that is widely used in programming languages and other computing contexts.
  • bait and switch - Bait and switch is a fraudulent practice in which a seller advertises a special deal but makes only a very small number of the items available for purchase.
  • barter economy - A barter economy is a cashless economic system in which services and goods are traded at negotiated rates.
  • battery life - Battery life is a measure of  battery performance and longevity, which can be quantified in several ways: as run time on a full charge, as estimated by a manufacturer in milliampere hours, or as the number of charge cycles until the end of useful life.
  • behavioral targeting - Behavioral targeting is the presentation of content and marketing based on the previous choices of users across websites.
  • big data CRM (big data customer relationship management) - Big data CRM (big data customer relationship management) refers to the practice of integrating big data into a company's CRM processes with the goals of improving customer service, calculating return on investment on various initiatives and predicting clientele behavior.
  • bioplastic - A bioplastic is a substance made from organic biomass sources, unlike conventional plastics which are made from petroleum.
  • BIOS (basic input/output system) - BIOS (basic input/output system) is the program a computer's microprocessor uses to start the computer system after it is powered on.
  • BIOS attack - A BIOS attack is an exploit that infects the BIOS with malicious code and is persistent through reboots and attempts to reflash the firmware.
  • BIOS rootkit - A BIOS-level rootkit is programming that exists in a system's memory hardware to enable remote administration.
  • Bitcoin ATM - A Bitcoin ATM is an automated teller machine that lets users buy, sell and transfer the cryptocurrency, just as regular ATMs provide financial services related to traditional currencies.
  • Bitcoin mining - Bitcoin mining is the processing of transactions in the digital currency system, in which the records of current Bitcoin transactions, known as a blocks, are added to the record of past transactions, known as the block chain.
  • Blogger - Blogger is a free Web log service from Google that allows users to share text, photos and videos.
  • body area network (BAN) - A body area network (BAN) is the interconnection of multiple computing devices worn on, affixed to or implanted in a person’s body.
  • bone conduction headphones - Bone conduction headphones -- sometimes called 'bonephones'-- are headphones that transmit sound waves through the bones in a user's skull instead of their ear canal.
  • Boolean operator - Boolean operators are a common type of search operator, sometimes referred to as a search parameters, which are characters or strings of characters – including words and phrases – that are used in a search engine query to narrow the focus of the search.
  • brain hijacking - Brain hijacking is the application of principles from fields including neuroscience, behavioral psychology and sociology to develop compulsive elements for consumer technologies.
  • bring your own apps (BYOA) - Bring your own apps (BYOA) is the trend toward employee use of third-party applications and cloud services in the workplace.
  • bring your own cloud (BYOC) - BYOC is a movement whereby employees and departments use their cloud computing service of choice in the workplace.
  • bring your own everything (BYOx) - Bring your own everything (BYOx) is a term that refers to employees' use of personal technology to perform work tasks.
  • bring your own wearables - Bring your own wearables (BYOW) is a trend toward the use of employee-owned wearable computing devices in a business setting.
  • burn-in - Burn-in is a test in which a system or component is made to run for an extended period of time to detect problems.
  • bus master - A bus master is the program, either in a microprocessor or more usually in a separate I/O controller, that directs traffic on the computer bus or input/output paths.
  • BYOD (bring your own device) - BYOD (bring your own device) is a policy that allows employees in an organization to use their personally owned devices for work-related activities.
  • card dipping (EMV card dipping) - Dipping can be contrasted with swiping.
  • catfish - A catfish is someone who creates a false identity online to deceive victims, often as a means of attracting romantic interest.
  • CAVE (Cave Automatic Virtual Environment) - CAVE (Cave Automatic Virtual Environment) is a virtual reality environment consisting of a cube-shaped room in which the walls, floors and ceilings are projection screens.
  • CCTV (closed circuit television) - CCTV (closed-circuit television) is a television system in which signals are not publicly distributed but are monitored, primarily for surveillance and security purposes.
  • CD-ROM - .
  • certification - In information technology as in other fields such as teaching, accounting, and acupuncture, certification is a formal process of making certain that an individual is qualified in terms of particular knowledge or skills.
  • CES (Consumer Electronics Show) - CES (International Consumer Electronics Show) is an annual technology conference for the consumer electronics industry.
  • change management - Change management is a systematic approach to dealing with the transition or transformation of an organization's goals, processes or technologies.
  • Chernobyl virus - The Chernobyl virus is a computer virus with a potentially devastating payload that destroys all computer data when an infected file is executed.
  • chip - "Chip" is short for microchip, the incredibly complex yet tiny modules that store computer memory or provide logic circuitry for microprocessors.
  • chipset - A chipset is a group of integrated circuits (microchips) that can be used together to serve a single function and are therefore manufactured and sold as a unit.
  • Chromebook - Google Chromebook is a thin client laptop that is configured with the Chrome operating system (Chrome OS).
  • Chromecast - Chromecast is a streaming media adapter from Google that allows users to play online content such as videos and music on a digital television.
  • clean install - A clean install is a software installation in which any previous version is removed.
  • click farm - A click farm is a business that pays employees to click on website elements to artificially boost the status of a client's website or a product.
  • clipboard - A clipboard is a temporary storage area for data that the user wants to copy from one place to another.
  • clipboard hijack attack - A clipboard hijacking is an exploit in which the attacker gains control of the victim's clipboard and replaces its contents with their own data, such as a link to a malicious Web site.
  • Clonezilla - Clonezilla is a free open source disk cloning application based on Debian.
  • cloud collaboration - Cloud collaboration is a system of communication that enables employees to work together on a project that is hosted in the cloud, can be accessed at any time and can be edited by multiple users at once.
  • CloudAV - CloudAV is a program that combines multiple antivirus applications and scans user files over a network of servers.
  • command prompt - A command prompt is the input field in a text-based user interface screen for an operating system or program.
  • commodity - A commodity is a type of widely-available product that is not markedly dissimilar from one unit to another.
  • commodity computer - A commodity computer is a standard-issue PC that is widely available for purchase.
  • commodity hardware - Commodity hardware, in an IT context, is a device or device component that is relatively inexpensive, widely available and more or less interchangeable with other hardware of its type.
  • Common Service Center (CSC) - A Common Service Center (CSC) is an information and communication technology (ICT) access point created under the National e-Governance Project of the Indian government.
  • Compute Card (Intel Compute Card) - Intel Compute Card is a device that includes everything needed to add a computing base to smart and connected devices.
  • consumerism - Consumerism is a cultural model that promotes the aquisition of goods, and especially the purchase of goods, as a vehicle for personal satisfaction and economic stimulation.
  • content curation - Content curation is the gathering, organizing and online presentation of content related to a particular theme or topic.
  • context awareness - Context awareness is the ability of a system or system component to gather information about its environment at any given time and adapt behaviors accordingly.
  • contextual computing - Contextual computing, also called context-aware computing, is the use of software and hardware to automatically collect and analyze data about a device's surroundings in order to present relevant, actionable information to the end user.
  • cooperative games - Cooperative games are games where players work with one and other in order to achieve a common objective.
  • COPE (corporate-owned, personally enabled) - COPE (corporate-owned personally-enabled) is a business model in which an organization provides its employees with mobile computing devices and allows the employees to use them as if they were personally-owned notebook computers, tablets or smartphones.
  • cord cutting - Cord cutting, in a telecommunications context, is the practice of stopping a cable or  satellite television service in favor of less expensive options, or getting rid of your landline phone and relying solely on cellular or VoIP (voice over IP) service.
  • coworking - Coworking is a business services provision model that involves individuals working independently or collaboratively in shared office space.
  • CPE device - A CPE device is telecommunications hardware located at the home or business of a customer.
  • creative destruction - Creative destruction is a process through which something new brings about the demise of whatever existed before it.
  • cryptocurrency - Cryptocurrency is a digital form of currency that uses cryptography to secure the processes involved in generating units, conducting transactions and verifying the exchange of currency ownership.
  • Ctrl-Alt-Delete - On a personal computer with the Microsoft Windows operating system, Control+Alt+Delete is the combination of the Ctrl key, the Alt key, and Del key that a user can press at the same time to terminate an application task or to reboot the operating system.
  • Cyber Monday - Cyber Monday is a marketing event created to promote online sales.
SearchCompliance
  • ISO 31000 Risk Management

    The ISO 31000 Risk Management framework is an international standard that provides businesses with guidelines and principles for ...

  • pure risk

    Pure risk refers to risks that are beyond human control and result in a loss or no loss with no possibility of financial gain.

  • risk reporting

    Risk reporting is a method of identifying risks tied to or potentially impacting an organization's business processes.

SearchSecurity
  • Twofish

    Twofish is a symmetric-key block cipher with a block size of 128 bits and variable-length key of size 128, 192 or 256 bits.

  • walled garden

    On the internet, a walled garden is an environment that controls the user's access to network-based content and services.

  • potentially unwanted program (PUP)

    A potentially unwanted program (PUP) is a program that may be unwanted, despite the possibility that users consented to download ...

SearchHealthIT
SearchDisasterRecovery
  • What is risk mitigation?

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

  • fault-tolerant

    Fault-tolerant technology is a capability of a computer system, electronic system or network to deliver uninterrupted service, ...

  • synchronous replication

    Synchronous replication is the process of copying data over a storage area network, local area network or wide area network so ...

SearchStorage
  • Remote Direct Memory Access (RDMA)

    Remote Direct Memory Access (RDMA) is a technology that enables two networked computers to exchange data in main memory without ...

  • storage (computer storage)

    Data storage is the collective methods and technologies that capture and retain digital information on electromagnetic, optical ...

  • storage medium (storage media)

    In computers, a storage medium is a physical device that receives and retains electronic data for applications and users and ...

Close