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Personal computing

Terms related to personal computers, including definitions about computers sold as consumer products and words and phrases about laptops, tablets and smartphones.

DAT - GOO

  • data cap (broadband cap) - A data cap is a specific amount of mobile data that a user account can access for a given amount of money, usually specified per month.
  • data plan (mobile data plan) - Since the advent of the smartphone made mobile Internet possible, most carriers offer data plans at varying rates based on the amount of data transfer allowed before a data cap is imposed.
  • DCE (Distributed Computing Environment) - In network computing, DCE (Distributed Computing Environment) is an industry-standard software technology for setting up and managing computing and data exchange in a system of distributed computers.
  • dead pixel - A dead pixel is a picture element in which all three RGB sub-pixels are permanently turned off, which creates a black spot in the display.
  • demo and demoscene - A demo is a non-interactive multimedia presentation that is rendered in real time.
  • desktop computer - A desktop computer is a personal computing device designed to fit on top of a typical office desk.
  • desktop personalization - Desktop personalization is the process of adjusting the look, feel and organization of a Windows end-user experience.
  • desktop search (integrated search) - Desktop search (sometimes called integrated search) is the ability to simultaneously search hard drives and removable storage on the user's computer.
  • device-agnostic (device agnosticism) - Device agnostic is a description for computing components that work with various systems without requiring any special adaptations.
  • digital body language (DBL) - Digital body language (DBL) is the aggregate of an individual’s online activity – including his or her email use, web visits, searches, referrals from social media sites and webinar attendance.
  • digital citizenship - Digital citizenship is the online presence, behaviors and response to others within a digital community where one is a member.
  • digital footprint - A digital footprint, sometimes called a digital dossier, is the body of data that exists as a result of actions and communications online that can in some way be traced back to an individual.
  • digital footprint management (DFM) - Digital footprint management (DFM) is an approach to controlling the amount and types of electronic data existing about a particular individual that can in some way be traced back to them.
  • digital native - A digital native is a person who grew up with the presence of digital technology or in the information age.
  • digital television (DTV) - Digital television (DTV) is the transmission of television signals using digital rather than conventional analog methods.
  • digital wallet - A digital wallet is a software application that serves as an electronic version of a physical wallet, digitizing credit and debit card information to enable consumers to make purchases from their smartphones.
  • digital wallet security - Digital wallets are used for transactions involving both conventional and digital currencies, but because the latter work differently, they require different safeguards – or at least variations on traditional security measures.
  • Direct Memory Access (DMA) - Direct Memory Access (DMA) is a capability provided by some computer bus architectures that allows data to be sent directly from an attached device (such as a disk drive) to the memory on the computer's motherboard.
  • Direct3D - Direct3D is the Microsoft 3D application programming interface (API) component of the DirectX API package.
  • disinformation - Disinformation is a type of untrue communication that is purposefully spread and represented as truth to elicit some response that serves the perpetrator's purpose.
  • disk analyzer - A disk analyzer is a piece of software that checks drives for space and usage and explores files and folders visually, simplifying file cleanup and optimization.
  • disk cloning - Disk cloning is the act of copying the contents of a computer's hard drive.
  • disk image - A disk image is a copy of the entire contents of a storage device, such as a hard drive, DVD, or CD.
  • disposable email - What is a disposable email?Disposable email is a service that allows a registered user to receive email at a temporary address that expires after a certain time period elapses.
  • distributed applications (distributed apps) - Distributed applications (distributed apps) are applications or software that runs on multiple computers within a network at the same time and can be stored on servers or with cloud computing.
  • distributed search - Distributed search is a search engine model in which the tasks of Web crawling, indexing and query processing are distributed among multiple computers and networks.
  • DNS redirection - DNS redirection is the controversial practice of serving a Web page to a user that is different from either the one requested or one that might reasonably be expected, such as an error page.
  • Do Not Track (DNT) - Do Not Track (DNT) is a browser setting that sends a message to websites and advertising networks requesting that they don't track the user.
  • downcycling - Downcycling is a recycling practice that involves breaking an item down into its component elements or materials.
  • DRAM (dynamic random access memory) - Dynamic random access memory (DRAM) is a type of semiconductor memory that is typically used for the data or program code needed by a computer processor to function.
  • drone (UAV) - A drone, in technological terms, is an unmanned aircraft.
  • dronie - A dronie is a self-portrait photograph (selfie) still or, more commonly, video recorded by a camera attached to a personal drone.
  • DRTC (Don't read the comments) - DRTC is an initialism for "Don't read the comments.
  • dual-carbon battery - Dual-carbon batteries are a new energy storage technology that uses a form of carbon for both the anode and the cathode.
  • dual-SIM phone - A dual SIM phone is a mobile phone, typically a smart phone, with the capacity to use two subscriber identity module (SIM) cards.
  • DuckDuckGo - DuckDuckGo (DDG) is a general search engine designed to protect user privacy, while avoiding the skewing of search results that can happen because of personalized search (sometimes referred to as a filter bubble).
  • Dyslexie - Dyslexie is a font designed for greater readability to help people who have difficulty reading.
  • e-cycling - E-cycling is the practice of reusing, or distributing for reuse, electronic equipment and components rather than discarding them at the end of their life cycle.
  • e-waste - E-waste is any refuse created by discarded electronic devices and components as well as substances involved in their manufacture or use.
  • Echo Show - The Echo Show is a smart speaker enabled with a 7-inch touchscreen by Amazon featuring Alexa, the company’s AI assistant.
  • EFSS (Enterprise file sync-and-share) - Enterprise file sync-and-share is a service that allows users to save files in cloud or on-premises storage and then access them on desktop and mobile devices.
  • electronic paper display (EPD) - An electronic paper display (EPD) is an electrically-charged surface that replicates the look and experience of ink on paper.
  • emoji - An emoji is a small image, either static or animated, that represents an emotion, an item or a concept (among other possibilities) in digital communications.
  • entity tag (ETag) - ETags use persistent identification elements (PIE) that have been tagged to the user’s browser.
  • EPEAT (Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool) - EPEAT (Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool) is a ranking system that helps purchasers in the public and private sectors evaluate, compare and select desktop computers, notebooks and monitors based on their environmental attributes.
  • evil twin - An evil twin, in security, is a rogue wireless access point that masquerades as a legitimate hot spot.
  • executable file (exe file) - An executable file (exe file) is a computer file that contains a sequence of instructions that the operating system can execute directly.
  • extended memory - Extended memory, also known as XMS (eXtended Memory Specification) is a technology that enables capacity above the 640KB standard MS-DOS limit of main memory.
  • external hard drive - An external hard drive is a portable storage device that can be attached to a computer through a USB or Firewire connection, or wirelessly.
  • eye tracking (gaze tracking) - Eye tracking is the process of electronically locating the point of a person's gaze, or following and recording the movement of the point of gaze.
  • Facebook - Facebook is a popular free social networking website that allows registered users to create profiles, upload photos and video, send messages and keep in touch with friends, family and colleagues.
  • Facebook Messenger - Facebook Messenger is a mobile app that enables chat, voice and video communications between Facebook web-based messaging and smartphones.
  • Facebook scam - A Facebook scam is a post or page on the popular social networking site designed to deceive users and spread rapidly through their personal networks.
  • Fairphone - Insofar as possible, Fairphone is made from recycled, recyclable and responsibly-sourced goods as well as minimal packaging.
  • Family Link - Family Link is the parental control app for Android devices.
  • fault-tolerant - Systems with integrated fault tolerance are designed to withstand multiple hardware failures to ensure continuous availability.
  • FDISK - WARNING: Use caution when repartitioning a hard disk drive that contains data.
  • Fedora - Fedora is a popular open source Linux-based operating system.
  • Fermi paradox - The Fermi paradox is the apparent conflict between the fact that humans have found no evidence of intelligent extraterrestrial life despite the probablity that it exists, given what we know about the universe.
  • field of view (FOV) - Field of view (FOV) is the open observable area a person can see through his or her eyes or via an optical device.
  • file-sharing applications - File-sharing applications are Web services that facilitate storing and sharing of content through the cloud.
  • filter bubble - A filter bubble is an algorithmic bias that skews or limits the information an individual user sees on the internet.
  • Firefox Reality - Firefox Reality is a multi-platform browser optimized for standalone VR (virtual reality), AR (augmented reality) and MR (mixed reality) headsets.
  • Firesheep - Firesheep is a Firefox plug-in that automates session hijacking attacks over unsecured Wi-Fi networks.
  • first follower theory - First follower theory is the concept that attracting an adherent to some kind of view or initiative is the first step toward beginning a movement, no matter how unusual or out-of-step with the surrounding culture it may seem to the general population.
  • first-person view (FPV) - First-person view (FPV), also known as first-person point of view (POV), is the ability of the user of some technology to see from a particular visual perspective other than one's actual location, such as the environment of a character in a video game, a drone, or a telemedicine client.
  • Flash cookie - Flash cookies, also known as local shared objects (LSO), are text files stored on a user’s hard drive when a browsers requests content that's supported by Adobe Flash.
  • Flat-panel TV Guide - Benefits of flat-panel TVs | Flat-panel features to considerA quick comparison of LCD, LED, OLED and plasma TVsFlat-panel TV technologies: LCD | LED | Plasma | OLEDMore informationA flat-panel TV is a television set that uses one of several different technologies for display in a flat, thin format.
  • flexible display - A flexible display or foldable tech/smartphone is a visual output surface on a device that is designed to be folded or closed like a book or a device which incorporates such a screen.
  • format war - A format war is a competition for market dominance -- and often survival -- between two or more producers of a particular type of product.
  • fourth wall - The fourth wall is a conceptual barrier between those presenting some kind of a communication and those receiving it.
  • fps (frames per second) - FPS stand for frames per second, a measurement for how many unique consecutive images a camera can handle each second.
  • FPV drone (first-person view drone) - An FPV drone is an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) with a camera that wirelessly transmits video feed to goggles, a headset, a mobile device or another display.
  • freebooting - Freebooting is the unauthorized duplication of digital content, which is then republished and presented as original work.
  • Freedom on the Net report - Freedom on the Net is an annual report on the extent to which people in countries around the globe can publish and access Internet content without undue restriction and have their rights respected.
  • full HDTV (ultra-HD, true HDTV, 1080p) - Full HDTV, also referred to as ultra-HD, true HDTV, and 1080p, is a television (TV) display technology specification that surpasses the quality over the original 720p high-definition television (HDTV) technology specification, providing an image resolution of 1920 by 1080 pixels.
  • full-disk encryption (FDE) - What is full-disk encryption (FDE)?Full-disk encryption (FDE) is encryption at the hardware level.
  • gaming - Gaming is the running of specialized applications known as electronic games, especially on machines designed for such programs and, in a more recent trend, using personal computers on the Internet in which case the activity is known as online gaming.
  • gaming disorder - Gaming disorder is the obsessive and compulsive overuse of internet games and video games as an escape from life, resulting in the prioritization of gaming over daily activities and interests and the continuation of gaming despite the negative consequences that may occur.
  • gaslighting - Gaslighting is a method of psychological manipulation based on undermining the target’s sense of reality, making them doubt their own perceptions, beliefs and/or memories.
  • general-purpose computer - A general-purpose computer is one that, given the appropriate application and required time, should be able to perform most common computing tasks.
  • Generation Z - Generation Z is the demographic cohort following Generation Y -- which is more popularly known as the Millennial Generation.
  • geospatial analysis - Geospatial analysis is the gathering, display, and manipulation of imagery, GPS, satellite photography and historical data, described explicitly in terms of geographic coordinates or implicitly, in terms of a street address, postal code, or forest stand identifier as they are applied to geographic models.
  • geotagging - Geotagging is the addition of geographical information, usually in the form of latitude and longitude coordinates, to Web sites, images, videos, smartphone transmissions, and various other data types and sources.
  • gift economy - A gift economy is one in which services or goods are given without an agreement as to a suitable payment or trade to be made in return.
  • GNU GRUB - GNU GRUB (or just GRUB) is a boot loader package that supports multiple operating systems on a computer.
  • Godwin's law - Godwin's law, also known as Godwin's rule of Hitler analogies, is a statement maintaining that if any online discussion continues long enough, someone will almost certainly compare someone else to Hitler.
  • Google +1 button - The Google +1 button is a feature that users can click to easily recommend and share Web content within their Google network.
  • Google ATAP (Advanced Technologies and Products) - Google ATAP (Advanced Technologies and Products) is the company's development lab for disruptive technologies.
  • Google Chrome OS - Google Chrome OS is an open source lightweight operating system (OS).
  • Google circles - Google circles are groups of people in the Google+ social platform created to enable easier, more targeted content sharing that are meant to more accurately represent real-life information sharing.
  • Google Docs - Google Docs is a free Web-based application in which documents and spreadsheets can be created, edited and stored online.
  • Google Free Zone - Google Free Zone was an initiative created by Google that would allow Google members in certain parts of the world to access Gmail and other Google services for free.
  • Google Glass - Google Glass is a wearable, voice- and motion-controlled Android device that resembles a pair of eyeglasses and displays information directly in the user's field of vision.
  • Google Knowledge Graph - Google Knowledge Graph is a knowledge base integrated with the Google search engine for a visually appealing and intuitive presentation of information related to queries.
  • Google Maps - Google Maps is a Web-based service that provides detailed information about geographical regions and sites around the world.
  • Google Now - Google Now is a Web-based service provided by Google that serves as a day planner.
  • Google Voice - Google Voice allows registered members to link their mobile phones, IP telephony applications and land line phones to a single Google Voice phone number.
  • Google+ (Google Plus) - Google+ (pronounced Google plus) is Google's social networking platform.
SearchCompliance
  • OPSEC (operations security)

    OPSEC (operations security) is a security and risk management process and strategy that classifies information, then determines ...

  • smart contract

    A smart contract is a decentralized application that executes business logic in response to events.

  • compliance risk

    Compliance risk is an organization's potential exposure to legal penalties, financial forfeiture and material loss, resulting ...

SearchSecurity
SearchHealthIT
SearchDisasterRecovery
  • What is risk mitigation?

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

  • change control

    Change control is a systematic approach to managing all changes made to a product or system.

  • disaster recovery (DR)

    Disaster recovery (DR) is an organization's ability to respond to and recover from an event that affects business operations.

SearchStorage
  • secondary storage

    Secondary storage is persistent storage for noncritical data that doesn't need to be accessed as frequently as data in primary ...

  • JBOD (just a bunch of disks)

    JBOD, which stands for 'just a bunch of disks,' is a type of multilevel configuration for disks.

  • bare-metal restore

    A bare-metal restore (also referred to as bare-metal recovery or bare-metal backup) is a data recovery and restoration process ...

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